Monday, December 31, 2018

Take the survey: How much is the AIA/SCS Annual Meeting costing you?

How much is the AIA/SCS Annual Meeting costing you?
What are the costs of attending our big annual conference each year? Whether it is for a job interview, presenting your current research, networking, or keeping up with the state of the fields of archaeology and Classics, the AIA/SCS is an annual tradition but can be a logistical and financial challenge for many. This survey is meant to gauge the financial costs of attending the AIA/SCS in January 2019 and who foots the bill. A rough estimate for each category is fine. Please provide amounts in your applicable currency ($, CAD, €, £, etc.). All results will remain anonymous, but feel free to contact me (Jacquelyn Clements) at jacquelynhelene@gmail.com if you have any questions. The survey will remain open until January 31, 2019.

Open Access Journal: Oriental Institute Annual Report

[First posted in AWOL 5 November 2009. Most recently updated 31 December 2018]

Oriental Institute Annual Report
ar2013-14-cover-web.jpg
The print versions of the Oriental Institute Annual Report are available for members as one of the privileges of membership. They are not for sale to the general public. They contain yearly summaries of the activities of the Institute’s faculty, staff, and research projects, as well as descriptions of special events and other Institute functions.

Oriental Institute 2017-2018 Annual Report


Download the Entire 2017-2018 Annual Report in a Single Adobe Acrobat Document


INTRODUCTION

RESEARCH

INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH

RESEARCH SUPPORT

MUSEUM

PUBLIC EDUCATION

DEVELOPMENT

FACULTY, RESEARCH ASSOCIATES, AND STAFF

INFORMATION



For an up to date list of all Oriental Institute publications available online see:

ARCE Sphinx Project 1979-1983 Archive: Maps, drawings, and photographs from the American Research Center in Egypt (ARCE) Sphinx Project, 1979-1983

The ARCE SPHINX PROJECT (1979-1983) aimed to produce scale drawings (plans and elevations) of the Great Sphinx of Giza, where no scale drawings of this unique monument had been produced before, to map the greater Sphinx site, including three ancient Egyptian temples situated east of the statue, and the larger quarry forming the Sphinx "amphitheater." Objectives included elevations, profiles, and a detailed master plan of the Sphinx, detailed section and profile drawings showing the masonry restorations added to the statue, topographical maps of the Sphinx ditch and larger quarry, and maps of the structural geology of the site, showing stratification and faults.
The idea was that we could achieve a better understanding of the origin of the Sphinx and how the 4th Dynasty Egyptians created the Sphinx from careful, recorded observations of its structure and geology, and that a good part of the history of the Sphinx could be read from detailed survey and mapping of the stratified masonry on the Sphinx, and from the condition of the bedrock core under the earliest masonry, as well as from analysis of tool marks and mortar bonding the different phases.
Dr. James Allen, then Assistant Director of the American Research Center (now Charles Edwin Wilbour Professor of Egyptology at Brown University) applied as Project Director to the Egyptian Antiquities Organization to survey and map the Sphinx. Mark Lehner served as Field Director. Ulrich Kapp (German Archaeological Institute in Cairo) carried out the photogrammetric survey and plotted the master profiles and elevations of the Sphinx. Team members included Christiane Zivie-Coche (Director, Centre Wladimir Golenischeff, École Pratique des Hautes Études, Egyptology), Attila Vass (survey), Susan Allen (now, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, survey), Peter Lacovara (then Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, now The Ancient Egyptian Egyptian Heritage and Archaeology Fund, survey) and Cynthia Schartzer (archaeology, survey), K. Lal Gauri (University of Louisville, geology), and Thomas Aigner (University of Tübingen, geology).
The ARCE SPHINX PROJECT ARCHIVE includes written, drawn, and color slide photographs and black and white photographs. Drawings include:
  • Master elevations of the front and sides of the Sphinx, scale 1:50.
  • Master plan of the Sphinx, scale 1:50
  • Detailed maps of the 4th Dynasty Khafre Valley Temple, the Sphinx Temple, and the 18th Dynasty Amenhotep II Temple, scale 1:100
  • Topographical and geological maps of the wider Sphinx “amphitheater,” scale 1:200
  • 1:1,000 map of the Sphinx and modern installations to the East as of 1979
  • Detailed architectural sections and elevations of the stratified ancient masonry layers applied to the Sphinx bedrock core body, scale 1:20 and 1:10
  • 5,000 slides
  • 2,716 black and white photographs
  • Profile of the Sphinx area with water table measurements taken during 1981-82.

Open Access Journal: Kernos - Revue internationale et pluridisciplinaire de religion grecque antique

[First posted in AWOL 23 February 2011. Most recently updated 31 December 2018]

Kernos - Revue internationale et pluridisciplinaire de religion grecque antique
ISSN électronique 2034-7871

Kernos - Couverture du no 23 | 2010
Kernos est la seule revue scientifique internationale entièrement consacrée à l’étude des faits et phénomènes religieux de la Grèce antique. Elle a pour ambition de fournir aux chercheurs en ce domaine, mais aussi à toute personne intéressée par les questions religieuses, un instrument de réflexion et des outils de travail pour progresser dans la connaissance du système religieux des Grecs.
Actuellement, les textes des numéros 1 à 17 sont uniquement accessibles au format pdf [fac-similé], librement téléchargeables.

EBGR - Index


Sunday, December 30, 2018

ANCIENT MAKERSPACES 2019: Digital Tools for Ancient World Study

ANCIENT MAKERSPACES 2019: Digital Tools for Ancient World Study
For the third year running…
About Ancient MakerSpaces
Almost all research, teaching, and scholarly communication in ancient studies today bears the imprint of digital technology in some way, yet the growing number of projects and the rapid rate of technological development present a distinct challenge for scholars who are interested in taking advantage of advances in the digital humanities.
This workshop is a space for students and scholars to interact with a variety of digital techniques and digital projects of broad application, providing participants the opportunity to engage in hands-on, peer-based learning.
Experienced digital humanists from various disciplines within ancient studies have developed demonstration curricula and will coordinate teams of trained demonstrators for each workshop station. The emphasis will be on learning to do things of immediate utility to scholarship and pedagogy. The workshop is comprised of five demonstrations and a series of lightning talks; together they will present techniques and projects dedicated to:
  • mapping
  • text tagging, annotating, searching, and editing
  • epigraphic squeezes
  • podcasting
  • collaborative commentaries
  • and more…

Open Access Journal: Dotawo: A Journal of Nubian Studies

 [First posted in AWOL 13 June 2014, updated 30 December 2018]

Dotawo: A Journal of Nubian Studies
Nubian studies needs a platform in which the old meets the new, in which archaeological, papyrological, and philological research into Meroitic, Old Nubian, Coptic, Greek, and Arabic sources confront current investigations in modern anthropology and ethnography, Nilo-­Saharan linguistics, and critical and theoretical approaches present in post­colonial and African studies.

The journal Dotawo: A Journal of Nubian Studies brings these disparate fields together within the same fold, opening a cross­-cultural and diachronic field where divergent approaches meet on common soil. Dotawo gives a common home to the past, present, and future of one of the richest areas of research in African studies. It offers a crossroads where papyrus can meet internet, scribes meet critical thinkers, and the promises of growing nations meet the accomplishments of old kingdoms.

We embrace a powerful alternative to the dominant paradigms of academic publishing. We believe in free access to information. Accordingly, we are proud to collaborate with DigitalCommons@Fairfield, an institutional repository of Fairfield University in Connecticut, USA, and with open-access publishing house punctum books. Thanks to these collaborations, every volume of Dotawo will be available both as a free online pdf and in online bookstores.
Volume 5 (2018) Nubian Women

Articles

An Old Nubian Letter from the Daughter of an Eparch
Vincent van Gerven Oei and Alexandros Tsakos

Volume 4 (2017)


Saturday, December 29, 2018

Severan Database Project

[First posted in AWOL 21 May 2013, updated 29 December 2018]

Severan Database Project
The Severan Database Project is a collection of three datasets containing historical evidence from the Severan Period (193-235).

Repository File Structure:
# Survey of coin hoards from the Severan Period
/data/hoard_analysis.csv

# Inscriptions mentioning Julia Domna
/data/julia_domna.csv

# Survey of 14 cities from Greece and Asia minor minting under the Severans
/data/provincial_coins.csv

Project Lead: Julie Langford
Associate Professor of Roman History
Department of History,
University of South Florida

Assistant: David J. Thomas, thePortus.com
Instructor of Ancient History and Digital Humanities,
Department of History,
University of South Florida

Graduate Assistant:
Christina Hotalen
NOTE: TBD


This project was originally hosted at http://web3.cas.usf.edu/main/other/severan/. The university page has since been removed. This dataset is an open-source publication of the raw data from that original project.
 

ANCIENT ROME LIVE: A new way to learn about Rome's past

[First posted in AWOL 29 April 2015, updated 29 December 2018]

ANCIENT ROME LIVE: A new way to learn about Rome's past
Ancient Rome Live
Rome’s enduring contribution to world civilization can, and should, be communicated in a way that combines the hard facts, solid reasoning, and new discoveries of university research with the excitement and immediacy of on-location filming in Rome. If a picture is worth a thousand words, then a video is worth a million.

Ancient Rome Live (ARL) is an immersive journey that provides new perspectives about the ancient city. A multi-platform learning experience, ARL first and foremost presents original content:

  • a clickable map of ancient Rome
  • a library of videos arranged according to topic
  • live streaming from sites in Rome and her empire.
ARL provides an interactive platform to engage the many layers of Rome: monuments, people, places, and events.  Ancient Rome Live  is a valuable resource for teachers- and a lot of fun for anyone interested in history.

Later in 2015 ARL will release an ebook, app, and free online course.   WIth all of these new, coordinated formats, ARL will change the way ancient Rome is studied.

Darius Arya, Archaeologist and TV host, Founder, director, producer

Albert Prieto, Archaeologist, Chief film and editing
Mark Brewer, Zagara Films, Film and editing
Andrea Troiani, Animator
Darbouze & Daughters, Digital Creative



Friday, December 28, 2018

Download Hebrew Manuscripts for free, in partnership with BL Labs

Download Hebrew Manuscripts for free, in partnership with BL Labs
We are delighted to announce that five more downloadable datasets containing a total of 139 digitised Hebrew Manuscripts have just been published online here, bringing the total number of Hebrew datasets to 22, and 723 manuscripts. These manuscripts were digitised as part of The Polonsky Foundation Catalogue of Digitised Hebrew Manuscripts (2013-2016), and we are able to provide them to download and reuse as part of the British Library Labs project (BL Labs).
1_harley_ms_5686_f028rFestival Prayer Book, Italy, 1427-11499. Harley MS 5686, ff. 28r: miniature on the top shows a congregation praying in a synagogue, and the miniature on the bottom depicts the allegorical ‘Shabbat Bride’ under a wedding canopy. The manuscript can be found in dataset Heb19
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Formed in 2013, BL Labs is an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation funded project which supports and inspires the use of the British Library’s digital collections and data in exciting and innovative ways, through competitions, events and collaborative projects around the world. The team provides a digital research support service (you may apply for up to 5 days’ support service using this form)and promotes engagement with the Library’s digital collections and data through a series of events and workshops around the UK.
Each autumn, the British Library Labs Awards recognises exceptional projects that have used the Library’s digital collections and data in four awards categories: Research, Artistic, Commercial, and Teaching/Learning (If you know of someone who has done outstanding work using British Library digital collections and data, please encourage them to apply).

What’s in the datasets?
The digitised manuscripts are provided as 300ppi JPEGs, divided into small datasets of around 50GB each, sorted alphabetically by shelfmark (20 to 30 manuscripts per dataset). They contain a huge variety of Hebrew manuscripts, including Kabbalistic works, linguistic works, prayer books, biblical texts and commentaries, marriage certificates, charters and scrolls. The manuscripts also contain texts in many different languages, including Latin, Greek, Yiddish, Persian, Italian, Arabic and Syriac. The catalogue records for all of these manuscripts can be found in dataset Heb1 (TEI XML files).
All of the manuscripts are Public Domain, but we would appreciate it if users could read our Ethical terms of use guide before reusing the Hebrew manuscripts datasets.
Below is an overview of each of the new datasets, and a full list of all of the manuscripts included in the datasets can be seen here. We'd love to hear what you've done or made with the manuscript images and/or metadata, so please email us at digitalresearch@bl.uk.
Heb18. This dataset includes 22 manuscripts ranging from Add MS 27141 to Arundel Or 50. It includes commentaries on the Talmud and Midrash, Kabbalistic works, two German prayer books (Add MS 27208 and Add MS 27556) and a collection of medical prescriptions ‘Sefer Refu’ot’ from the 15th century, Germany (Add MS 27170). The miscellany Arundel OR 50 (1400-1799) includes a Hebrew Grammar in Latin, with a translation of the Lord's Prayer and the Christian confession of faith.
This dataset also includes ‘The Polyglot Bible’ (Add MS 5242), created in England in 1665. As well as having beautifully detailed illustrations, this manuscript, will be of great interest to linguists. It contains excerpts from the Old and New Testament and liturgical pieces translated into many different languages: Latin, Greek, Hebrew, Syriac, Aramaic, Ethiopic, Arabic, Persian, Coptic, Spanish, Italian, French and German.
3_add_ms_5242_f007v3_add_ms_5242_f007vThe Polyglot Bible, England, 1665 Add MS 5242, ff. 7v-8r: the commandment of keeping the Sabbath 
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5_add_ms_5242_f014v5_add_ms_5242_f014v
The Polyglot Bible, England, 16, Add MS 5242, ff. 14v-15r: Canticum B Virginis
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Heb19. This dataset includes 20 manuscripts from Harley MS 1743 to Or 12983. It contains many manuscripts looking at language and translation, including several Hebrew-Latin dictionaries and grammars, a 17 – 18th-century copy of the Psalms with Greek and Latin translations (Harley MS 2427), and Harley MS 7637, an 18th-century gospel of St Matthew in Hebrew translation. It also contains the 18 – 19th-century German manuscript ‘Perek Shirah’ (Or 12983), a midrashic commentary with a Yiddish translation.
6_or_12983_f001rPerek Shirah, Germany, 1750 – 1899, Or 12983, f. 1r: a depiction of the world God created at the beginning of Chapter 1 of ‘Perek Shirah’: “The Heavens are saying: ‘The Heavens speak of God’s glory, and the skies tell of His handiwork.’ (Ps. 19:2)” 
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The dataset also includes two early copies of parts of the Talmud – one of the central texts in Judaism. Harley MS 5794* (this manuscript has since been renamed in the British Library catalogue as Harley MS 5794A) contains sections of the Mishnah of Tractates Avot and Zeva’im, and was written in Spain in the 12th century. The manuscript Harley MS 5508 contains eight tractates of Seder Mo’ed from the Babylonian Talmud, and it was written in Spain in the 12th or 13th-century.
Heb20. This dataset includes 32 manuscripts from Or 2486 to Or 2508. It includes many different biblical commentaries and Midrashim (biblical exegesis) in Persian, Arabic, and Judeo-Arabic. Some of these range from as early as the 13th century (such as Or 2494 – Or 2497).
The dataset also includes the Torah scroll Or 13027. This 30 metre, 18-19th century scroll was digitised alongside its silk mantle, which was extensively restored by the British Library’s textile conservator Liz Rose. An article discussing her work can be seen here. As part of the Hebrew Manuscript Digitisation Project’s digital scholarship activities, this Torah mantle was 3D modelled by Dr Adi Keinan-Schoonbaert. You can read more about 3D imaging within the British Library here, and the 3D image of the Torah Mantle can be viewed, annotated and downloaded from Sketchfab.
7_or_13027_fs001rPentateuch Scroll, Or 13027, unknown, 1750–1899. Silk brocade mantle after conservation 
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Heb21. This dataset includes 33 manuscripts from Or 2518 to Or 5834. It includes many Arabic and Judeo-Arabic commentaries ranging in age from the 10th to the 16th centuries, such as on the Psalms and other biblical books from the Prophets and the Hagiographa. The earliest of these (Or 2552) is a collection of commentaries on Ecclesiastes and Lamentations, and Japheth ben Ali's Arabic commentary on Job. Japheth ben Ali is considered to be the foremost Karaite commentator on the bible, and he lived during the ‘Golden Age of Karaism’ in the 10th century. He died sometime in the second half of the 10th century, and so this manuscript, dated between the 10th and 11th century, could feasibly have been copied during his lifetime, or by someone who knew him directly.
9_or_2672_f067r 9_or_2672_f067rSefer ha-Peli’ah, unknown, 1562. Or 2672, ff. 31r and 67r: two folios from ‘Sefer ha-Peli’ah’ (The Book of Wonder), a Kabbalistic biblical commentary
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Heb22. This dataset contains 32 manuscripts from Or 6236 to Stowe Ch 297. As well as several commentaries, a magic spell, and the Revelation of St John in Hebrew translation (Sloane MS 237), this dataset includes six different Jewish marriage certificates (Ketubot) dating from between 1711 and 1835, and a discussion on marriage law from the 15th century (Or 6358).
Stowe Ch 297 is part of the British Library’s fascinating collection of English charters dating to before the expulsion of the Jews in 1290. It is a French quitclaim with a Hebrew docket dating from 1266, in which Beatriz of Rattlesden, the prioress and the convent of Flixton is released from any obligation on the lands she and her convent acquired from Oliver Buscel.
Or 6360 is a 17-18th-century collection of astrological, kabbalistic and magical fragments. It includes ‘Sefer ha-Levanah’, an astrological book about the stages of the moon’s orbit, and ‘Mafteah Shelomoh’, a Hebrew translation of part one of the 14th or 15th-century grimoire ‘Key of Solomon’, one of only two versions that exist in Hebrew (part two, in Or 14759, is in the process of being digitised as part of Phase 2 of the Hebrew Manuscripts Digitisation Project). The text is attributed to King Solomon, and it would have been written originally in Latin or Italian. It includes invocations to summon the dead or demons, and compel them to do the reader’s will. It also includes curses and spells such as for finding stolen items, invisibility, and love.
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Collection of Astrological, Kabbalistic and Magical Fragments, unknown, 1600–1700. Or 6360, f. 1r:the first page of ‘Sefer ha-Levanah’, with an Astrologer
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