Wednesday, December 8, 2021

Open Access Journal: Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture

[First posted in AWOL 24 March 2019, updated 8 December 2021]

Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture
ISSN: 2399-1844 (Print) 
ISSN: 2399-1852 (online) 


The Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture - JHP - was launched 2016 in Berlin, Germany, by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom, Patricia Kögler and Wolf Rudolph - specialists working in the field of Hellenistic material culture.
JHP is an independent learned journal dedicated to the research of ceramics and objects of daily use of the Hellenistic period in the Mediterranean region and beyond. It aims at bringing together archaeologists, historians, philologists, numismatists and scholars of related disciplines engaged in the research of the Hellenistic heritage.
JHP wants to be a forum for discussion and circulation of information on the everyday culture of the Hellenistic period which to date is still a rather neglected field of study. To fill this academic void the editors strive for a speedy and non-bureaucratic publication and distribution of current research and recent discoveries combined with a high quality standard. The journal appears annually in print and as a free online downloadable PDF.

NEW: Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture Volume 5 2020 / 2021 edited by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Patricia Kögler. Paperback; 210x297; 170 pages.. 5 . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698336. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 2399-1852-5-2020. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

JHP is an independent learned journal dedicated to the research of ceramics and objects of daily use of the Hellenistic period in the Mediterranean region and beyond. It aims at bringing together archaeologists, historians, philologists, numismatists and scholars of related disciplines engaged in the research of the Hellenistic heritage.

Table of Contents
Editorial ;
Submission Guidelines ;
List of Contributors ;
Abbreviations ;

ARTICLES ;
Pottery and Burial Customs in Hellenistic Megara, Greece – Yannis Chairetakis ;
Dolphins in the Ionian-Adriatic Basin. Hellenistic Moldmade Ware from Orikos, Southern Illyria (Excavations 2012–2020) – Carlo De Mitri ;
Ai Khanoum: A Case Study into Material Culture as a Marker for Ethnocultural Identity and Syncretism on the Hellenistic Frontier – David Thomas Richey-Lowe ;
Contextualizing the Star-shaped Lamps in the Levant – Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom ;
Lissos in Illyria, 2: A Hellenistic Fill from the Upper Town and Some Considerations on the Importance of Ceramic Debris – Patricia Kögler ;

ARCHAEOLOGICAL NEWS AND PROJECTS ;
Indroducing the Levantine Ceramic Project (LCP, www.levantineceramics.org) – Andrea M. Berlin ;

BOOK REVIEWS ;
S. Yu. Monakhov – J. V. Kuznetzova – N. F. Fedoseev – N. B. Churekova, Amphoras of the VI–II Centuries BC from the Collection of the East Crimean Historical and Cultural Reserve and S. Yu. Monakhov – J. V. Kuznetzova – N. B. Churekova, Amphoras of the V–II Centuries BC from the Collection of the State Historical and Archeological Museum-Reserve ›The Tauric Chersonesos‹Nikolai Jefremow
 
Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture Volume 4 2019 edited by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Patricia Kögler. Paperback; 210x297mm; 204 pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 4 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697841. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

JHP is an independent learned journal dedicated to the research of ceramics and objects of daily use of the Hellenistic period in the Mediterranean region and beyond. It aims at bringing together archaeologists, historians, philologists, numismatists and scholars of related disciplines engaged in the research of the Hellenistic heritage.

ARTICLES ;
Understanding the Jal el-Bahr Storage-Jar Assemblage – Donald T. Ariel ;
Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeologica Project: Excavations at Pyla-Vigla in 2019 – Justin Stephens, Brandon R. Olson, Thomas Landvatter & R. Scott Moore ;
A Hellenistic Farmhouse at the Entrance to the Town of El’ad – All Nagorsky ;
Cave 169 at Marisa: The Imported Ptolemaic Red Ware – Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom ;
Lissos in Illyria: Two Centuries of Hellenistic Pottery, and a Plea for the Publication of Contextual Material – Patricia Kögler ;

BOOK REVIEWS ;
Sarah James, Hellenistic Pottery. The Fine Wares, Corinth 7, 7 – Brice Erickson ;
Gabriel Mazor, Walid Atrash & Gerald Finkielsztejn, Bet She’an IV. Hellenistic Nisa-Scythopolis. The Amphora Stamps and Sealings from Tel Iztabba – Marek Palaczyk ;
Henrieta Todorova (ed.), Durankulak 3. Die hellenistischen Befunde – Reyhan Şahin ;
Idit Sagiv, Representations of Animals on Greek and Roman Engraved Gems. Meaning and Interpretations – Shua Amorai-Stark & Malka Hershkovitz ;
Kalliope Bairami, Large Scale Rhodian Sculpture of Hellenistic and Roman Times – Natalia Kazakidi ;
Qumran, Unchecked Parallelomina, and Pseudonymity in Academic Publication, review article of Kenneth Silver, Alexandria and Qumran: Back to the Beginning – Dennis Mizzi
 
Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture Volume 3 2018 edited by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Patricia Kögler. Paperback; 210x297mm; xvi+208 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (43 plates in colour). Papers in English and German. 3 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691719. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 2399-1852-3-2019. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

ARTICLES
Notes on a Hellenistic Milk Pail – by Yannis Chairetakis
Chasing Arsinoe (Polis Chrysochous, Cyprus): A Sealed Early Hellenistic Cistern and Its Ceramic Assemblage – by Brandon R. Olson, Tina Najbjerb & R. Scott Moore
Hasmonean Jerusalem in the Light of Archaeology – Notes on Urban Topography – by Hillel Geva
A Phoenician / Hellenistic Sanctuary at Horbat Turit (Kh. et-Tantur) – by Walid Atrash, Gabriel Mazor & Hanaa Aboud with contributions by Adi Erlich & Gerald Finkielsztejn
Schmuck aus dem Reich der Nabatäer – hellenistische Traditionen in frührömischer Zeit – by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom

ARCHAEOLOGICAL NEWS AND PROJECT
Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project: Excavations at Pyla-Vigla in 2018 – by Thomas Landvatter, Brandon R. Olson, David S. Reese, Justin Stephens & R. Scott Moore
Bookmark: Ancient Gems, Finger Rings and Seal Boxes from Caesarea Maritima. The Hendler Collection – by Shua Amorai-Stark & Malka Herskovitz

BOOK REVIEWS
Nina Fenn, Späthellenistische und frühkaiserzeitliche Keramik aus Priene. Untersuchungen zu Herkunft und Produktion – by Susanne Zabehlicky-Scheffenegger
Raphael Greenberg, Oren Tal & Tawfiq Da῾adli, Bet Yerah III. Hellenistic Philoteria and Islamic al- Ṣinnabra. The 1933–1986 and 2007–2013 Excavations – bY Gabriel Mazor
Mohamed Kenawi & Giorgia Marchiori, Unearthing Alexandria’s archaeology: The Italian Contribution – by Carlo De Mitri
Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture: Subscription Portal for Online Access by One volume published annually. Edited by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph (Heads of Editorial Board). ISBN 2399-1844-PORTAL. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  

Welcome to the online portal for access to volumes of the Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture (JHP).

For the Hellenistic Period ceramics and other commodities of daily life represent probably the most neglected objects in archaeological research. Yet, the study of Hellenistic material culture has intensified during the last twenty years, with a focus clearly on what is by far the largest category of finds, pottery. Meanwhile research has gained momentum, but still there has unfortunately been no parallel development in the media landscape. Apart from monographs, the publication of conference proceedings, which usually follow several years after the event, have remained the principal method of disseminating research results. Still lacking is a publication appearing regularly and at short intervals, that focusses research on Hellenistic pottery and is easily accessible.

The Journal of Hellenistic Pottery – JHP – wants to close this gap.

JHP is scheduled to appear once a year, more often if necessary. It should provide a forum for all kinds of studies on Hellenistic pottery and everyday objects. Apart from professional articles, the journal will contain book reviews, short presentations of research projects (including dissertations) and general news. The Editorial Board is headed by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph.

Access journal issues and articles via the links below:

JHP Volume 4, 2019
Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture Volume 2 2017 edited by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph (Heads of Editorial Board). xii+220 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 2 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 2399-1844-2-2017. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 2399-1852-2-2017. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Table of Contents

Articles:
• Nadia Aleotti, Rhodian Amphoras from Butrint (Albania): Dating, Contexts and Trade
• Donald T. Ariel, Imported Hellenistic Stamped Amphora Handles and Fragments from the North Sinai Survey
• Ofra Guri-Rimon, Stone Ossuaries in the Hecht Museum Collection and the Issue of Ossuaries Use for Burial
• Gabriel Mazor & Walid Atrash, Nysa-Scythopolis: The Hellenistic Polis
• Hélène Machline & Yuval Gadot, Wading Through Jerusalem’s Garbage: Chronology, Function, and Formation Process of the Pottery Assemblages of the City’s Early Roman Landfill
• Kyriakos Savvopoulos, Two Hadra Hydriae in the Colection of the Patriarchal Sacristy in Alexandria
• Wolf Rudolph & Michalis Fotiadis, Neapolis Scythica – Simferopol – Test Excavations 1993

Archaeological News and Projects:
• »Dig for a Day« with the Archaeological Seminars Institute

Reviews:
• John Lund, A Study of the Circulation of Ceramics in Cyprus from the 3rd Century BC to the 3rd Century AD (by Brandon R. Olson)
• Gloria London, Ancient Cookware from the Levant. An Ethnoarchaeological Perspective (by John Tidmarsh)
• Michela Spataro & Alexandra Villing (eds.), Ceramics, Cuisine and Culture: The Archaeology and Sience of Kitchen Pottery in the Ancient Mediterranean World (by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom)
• James C. R. Gill, Dakhleh Oasis and the Western Desert of Egypt under the Ptolemies (by Andrea M. Berlin)
• Anna Gamberini, Ceramiche fini ellenistiche da Phoinike. Forme, produzioni, commerce (by Carlo De Mitri)
• Maja Mise, Gnathia and Related Hellenistic Ware on the East Adriatic Coast (by Patricia Kögler)
• Jens-Arne Dickmann & Alexander Heinemann (eds.), Vom Trinken und Bechern. Das antike Gelage im Umbruch (by Stella Drougou)
 
Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture Volume 1 2016 edited by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph (Heads of Editorial Board). xiv+212 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 1 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 2399-1844-1-2016. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 2399-1852-1-2016. Download Full PDF   Buy Now

Table of Contents:
A Fill from a Potter’s Dump at Morgantina – by Shelley Stone
Trade in Pottery within the Lower Adriatic in the 2nd century BCE – by Carlo De Mitri
Hellenistic Ash Containers from Phoinike (Albania) – by Nadia Aleotti
Pottery Production in Hellenistic Chalkis, Euboea. Preliminary Notes – by Yannis Chairetakis
A Terracotta Figurine of a War Elephant and Other Finds from a Grave at Thessaloniki – by Eleni Lambrothanassi & Annareta Touloumtzidou
Moldmade Bowls from Straton’s Tower (Caesarea Maritima) – by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom
Greco-Roman Jewellery from the Necropolis of Qasrawet (Sinai) – by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom

ARCHAEOLOGICAL NEWS AND PROJECTS
Panathenaic Amphorae of Hellenistic and Roman Times – by Martin Streicher

BOOK REVIEWS
Shelley C. Stone, Morgantina Studies 6. The Hellenistic and Roman Fine Wares – by Peter J. Stone
Pia Guldager Bilde & Mark L. Lawall (eds.), Pottery, Peoples and Places, BSS 16 – by Kathleen Warner Slane
Susan I. Rotroff, Hellenistic Pottery. The Plain Wares, Agora 33 – by Patricia Kögler

end of results

DEChriM (“Deconstructing Early Christian Metanarratives: Fourth-Century Egyptian Christianity in the Light of Material Evidence”)

DEChriM (“Deconstructing Early Christian Metanarratives: Fourth-Century Egyptian Christianity in the Light of Material Evidence”) is a five-year project supported by an ERC Consolidator Grant, and running from 2019 to 2024. Based at the MF Norwegian School of Theology, Religion and Society, in Oslo, the project brings together specialists in archaeology, papyrology and epigraphy (Greek, Coptic and Syriac), ceramic studies, digital humanities, 3D architectural reconstructions, topography and photogrammetry, and is led by Prof. Victor Ghica.

A massive corpus of unedited archaeological sources collected over the last two decades from the deserts of Egypt, by far the richest available for the fourth century, sheds a radically new light on Christianity in Egypt. Building on this new dataset, DEChriM reassesses phenomena and developments that are defining for Egypt’s Christianisation, such as the chronology and dynamics of the evangelisation, the role played in this process by imperial legislation and institutions, the balance between rural and urban Christian communities, the social and cultural profile of the conveyors of Christianity, strategies for negotiating Christian identity, etc. Grounded in the archaeological record, DEChriM addresses also key issues relating to material culture through, among others, producing a catalogue of fourth-century Christian archaeological material, both monumental and artefactual (published online in the 4CARE database), providing absolute dates and occupation sequences for the most significant monuments, systematising chrono-typologically fourth-century Christian architecture or producing a long overdue catalogue of the ceramic production of the fourth century in Egypt. As suggested already by the pre-treatment of the corpus, the picture of fourth-century Egyptian Christianity emerging from this mass of data shifts the paradigm with which operates the historiography of late antique Egypt. Whilst deconstructing the prevailing metanarratives on fourth-century Christian Egypt, the project aims for hypercontextualised regional micro-narratives valid for some regions of Egypt, but potentially relevant for or extrapolable to other provinces of the Late Roman Empire. An inter- and trans-disciplinary collective endeavour calling upon a variety of disciplines, methods and techniques, DEChriM constitutes the first in-depth regional study in fourth-century Christian archaeology.

The inner architecture of the project is articulated in 10 work packages oriented towards collecting the material remains, both movables and immovables, associated with fourth-century Christianity in Egypt and studying them along a variety of lines of research and from various perspectives. The production of the catalogue/database at the core of the project relies on a variety of data collection operations on the field, in Egypt, and in public or private collections around the world.

Guide to the 4CARE and SKOS databases

 

4CARE database

 

Content

 

Created by the DEChriM team and showcasing the project’s archaeological material basis, the 4CARE (Fourth-Century Christian Archaeological Record of Egypt) database is a collective endeavour initiated in 2019. The database contains both sites and artefacts directly related to the material culture of Christianity in fourth-century Egypt. Although still in process of being populated, the database aims to provide an exhaustive inventory of the fourth-century Christian material found in Egypt. Conceived as a relational database, 4CARE presents archaeological sites and mobile archaeological material interconnected.

 

Archaeological sites

Two types of locations are marked on the maps included on the starting page of 4CARE: localities where Christian archaeological vestiges (churches, monasteries, cemeteries or even single tombs or graves) are preserved, and localities where Christian objects, but no monuments or funerary structures, where discovered. The former type of site is marked on the maps with the symbol , while the latter with the symbol .

 

All the sites included in the database (called Places) are described on a specific page, which contains several descriptors:

    • toponyms in several languages, both ancient and modern;
    • an internal numeric identifier (DEChriM ID);
    • external numeric identifiers from other relevant gazetteers (Trismegistos, Pleiades, PAThs Atlas);
    • an ancient name considered as standard (in Greek or Coptic);
    • geographical coordinates (expressed in decimal degrees);
    • the dates of the occupation (expressed in termini, which are either absolute, when available, or relative);
    • the type of settlement (….);
    • the criteria considered in the dating of the occupation of the site;
    • a description providing an overview of the main areas and monuments of the site;
    • a very brief summary of the archaeological research carried out on the site;
    • a bibliography, which, although not exhaustive, tends to cover the most relevant studies.

Each archaeological site is accompanied also by external links to websites that refer to it. The internal links connect a site with the archaeological material associated with it that is included in the database. The section Json data provides elements of selected machine readable information. A selection of maps and photos accompany each site. Finally, the section 3D models includes photogrammetric models and 3D reconstructions of areas of sites or of specific monuments. These can be visualised in a Sketchfab window in three different resolutions.

 

The criterion governing the incorporation of sites in 4CARE is material evidence, built or mobile, dating or datable to the fourth century. Individual built structures or remains thereof that might be assigned to the fourth century on the basis of relative chronology were also included, although they are rare (Ǧabal Mūsā and Maryūṭ/Mareia are two examples). These were incorporated in the database for the sake of exhaustiveness and their dating is duly discussed.

 

Archaeological sites considered by the Supreme Council of Antiquities as independent archaeological areas are treated in 4CARE as discrete units and individual sites, even in the cases where these sites belonged in Antiquity to a larger settlement, or grouping or settlements. One exception has been made in the 4CARE database to this rule, and that is for Aḫmīm. The reason why several archaeological sites were grouped in 4CARE under the unique entry Aḫmīm is that numerous artefacts retrieved or said to have been found in the area of ancient Panopolis have unspecified provenance and, thus, could have been unearthed in any of the zones that form now the large archaeological area of Aḫmīm.

 

Artefacts

The 4CARE database aims at gathering Christian artefacts dated to the fourth century found in Egypt, regardless of the location of their production. The material selected for inclusion can be divided into two large groups: textual and non textual objects. The former category (Class: Textual) contains three sorts of texts (Text content): Literary; Subliterary; Documentary. The latter category comprises a variety of object types (Class): Architectural element; Cooking/table/transport/storage ware; Domestic object; Funerary element; Garment/adornment/accessories; Human remains; Liturgical object; Ornamental element. All objects are further defined by Material type, while textual artefacts are also characterised by, for papyrological texts, the Writing medium involved: Codex; Sheet/roll; Label; Ostracon; Tablet; and, for epigraphical texts, the Writing technique: Dipinto; Graffito; Inscription. Finally, the Language is indicated for textual artefacts.

 

Two main types of criteria underpin the selection of the artefactual material included in the 4CARE database. The first ones are internal Christian markers. In the case of literary texts, these are obvious and are reflected in the literary genre itself: Biblical; Apocryphal/Gnostic/Hermetic; Hagiographic; Theological (including patristic texts, commentaries, homilies, treatises, letters, etc.). The same applies to the Liturgical texts (including prayers, hymns, etc.) categorised in the Subliterary class. In other subliterary (such as amulets, school texts or magical texts) and documentary texts, these internal markers include use of: terms/formulas/concepts suggestive of Christianity;  Christian symbols/isopsephy; Nomina sacra; and/or mention to: Christian cult officials (priests, deacons, readers, etc.) or institutions (church, monastery, etc.); Christian people/communities (mentioned as such or through Christian onomastics). To these must be equally added the use of Coptic language, which is taken here as a confessional indicator, as well as materiality suggestive of Christian context (codex, parchment).

 

Both textual and non textual artefacts lacking the above mentioned criteria might, nonetheless, be included in the database on account of external factors. Thus, when an object is associated with an archaeological context already characterised by assemblages of, or isolated material securely definable as Christian, the object is considered as potentially informative of the material culture of fourth-century Christians in Egypt, although, obviously, not Christian per se.

 

The 4CARE database includes also Manichaean textual material. The reasons for incorporating these texts – both literary and documentary – lie in the social setting of at least certain Manichaean groups attested in late antique Egypt, and will be explained elsewhere.

 


 

ChrysoCollate 1.0

 

ChrysoCollate is a free program for collating and editing texts in any language (Unicode). It allows you to easily collate your manuscripts, order them and compare them, and provide you with tools for easy editing, as the making of automatic apparatus.

The program offers:

  • two modes: collation mode and edition mode;
  • a collation table with automatic distinctive colours and previsional completion of readings;
  • annotation tools for the collation table, including a system of references to the images of the witnesses that allows you to navigate easily in your textual tradition;
  • automatic apparatus, according to the readings that are chosen by the editor;
  • a stemma codicum checker;
  • a translation box to manage and synchronise your translation;
  • exportation in various formats (odt, cte, etc.).

Sébastien Moureau
Chercheur qualifié at the F.R.S.-FNRS
Professor at the Université catholique de Louvain
(sebastien[dot]moureau[at]uclouvain[dot]be)

ChrysoCollate Copyright © Sébastien Moureau

Classical Archaeology in the Digital Age – The AIAC Presidential Panel

Kristian Göransson (Hrsg.) 
 Classical Archaeology in the Digital Age – The AIAC Presidential Panel

Panel 12.1

Archaeology and Economy in the Ancient World – Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Classical Archaeology, Cologne/Bonn 2018

Die Klassische Archäologie ist eine Disziplin, die in den letzten Jahrzehnten große Veränderungen erfahren hat. Von ihren Ursprüngen als "Altertumswissenschaft" mit einem starken Schwerpunkt auf Kunst und Architektur hat sich die Klassische Archäologie die modernsten Methoden der Feldarchäologie und Datenanalyse zu eigen gemacht. Die Anwendung der digitalen Geisteswissenschaften auf die Klassische Archäologie hat die Art und Weise verändert, wie Archäologen arbeiten, wie Daten gesammelt und aufbewahrt werden und wie die Ergebnisse der wissenschaftlichen Gemeinschaft und der Öffentlichkeit im Allgemeinen zur Verfügung gestellt werden. Die International Association for Classical Archaeology (AIAC) war mit der Gründung und dem Betrieb von Fasti Online und der Online-Zeitschrift FOLD&R ein Vorreiter in den digitalen Geisteswissenschaften. Dieser Band enthält Beiträge, die auf dem von der AIAC organisierten Panel präsentiert wurden, um die digitale Entwicklung der Disziplin anhand von Beispielen aus verschiedenen Ländern darzustellen. Es ist zu hoffen, dass die Fallstudien eine Grundlage für eine Diskussion über Klassische Archäologie in einer digitalen Welt bieten - Nutzen, Herausforderungen und wohin die schnelle Entwicklung unsere Disziplin in Zukunft führen könnte.

 

Tuesday, December 7, 2021

Open Access Journal: AMİSOS

[First posted in AWOL 13 July 2020, updated 7 December 2021]
 
ISSN: 2587-2222
E-ISSN: 2587-2230
 
AMİSOS Dergisi Sosyal Bilimler alanlarında ulusal ve uluslararası düzeyde bilimsel niteliklere sahip çalışmaları yayımlayarak sosyal bilimlerin bilgi birikimine katkıda bulunmayı amaçlamaktadır.
 
Dergi konu olarak, Paleoantropoloji, Prehistorya, Protohistorya, Önasya Arkeolojisi, Deneysel Arkeoloji, Klasik Arkeoloji, Anadolu ve Yakındoğu Arkeolojisi, Eskiçağ Tarihi, Hititoloji, Sümeroloji, Epigrafi, Çocukluk ve Çocuk Arkeolojisi, Antropoloji, Yerleşim Arkeolojisi, Sualtı Arkeolojisi, Bizans Sanatı, Osmanlı Sanatı, Avrupa Sanatı, Nümizmatik, Mimarlık Tarihi, Restorasyon ve Konservasyon, Müzecilik vb. sosyal bilimler alanlarındaki ana konular ile bunlarla ilgili konulara yer veren hakemli bir dergidir.

AMİSOS Dergisi; 2016 yılından itibaren “Hakemli Dergi” statüsüne uygun; Haziran ve Aralık aylarında olmak üzere yılda iki sayı olarak yayımlanmaktadır.


 See AWOL's full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies

Open Access Monograph Series: Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident

[First poted in AWOL 19 January 2018, updated 7 December 2021]

Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident
Der WissenschaftsCampus Mainz ist eine Forschungskooperation zwischen dem Leibniz Institut Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum und der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz. Ziel ist es, eine breite Plattform für interdisziplinäre Byzanzforschung institutionell zu etablieren. Beteiligt sind neben der Byzantinistik sowie der Christlichen Archäologie und Byzantinischen Kunstgeschichte sämtliche Fächer, die zur Erforschung des Byzantinischen Reiches und seiner Kultur beitragen. Der WissenschaftsCampus Mainz fördert die Integration der zersplitterten Wissenschaftsdisziplinen, die sich mit Byzanz befassen. Er ermöglicht themenorientierte, multidisziplinäre, historisch-kulturwissenschaftliche Forschung unter einem Dach und bewirkt durch einen gemeinsamen Auftritt der Byzanzforschung eine bessere Sichtbarkeit dieses Fachgebiets.

Die Schriftenreihe "Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident" dient als Publikationsorgan für das Forschungsprogramm des Leibniz-WissenschaftsCampusMainz, das Byzanz, seine Brückenfunktion zwischen Ost und West sowie kulturelle Transfer- und Rezeptionsprozesse von der Antike bis in die Neuzeit in den Blick nimmt. Die Methoden und Untersuchungsgegenstände der verschiedenen Disziplinen, die sich mit Byzanz beschäftigen, werden dabei jenseits traditioneller Fächergrenzen zusammengeführt, um mit einem historisch-kulturwissenschaftlichen Zugang Byzanz und seine materielle und immaterielle Kultur umfassend zu erforschen.

Ein Jahr nach Erscheinen der Printausgabe werden alle Bände der Reihe im Open Access verfügbar gemacht.

Miriam Rachel Salzmann

Negotiating Power and Identities
Latin, Greek and Syrian Élites in Fifteenth-Century Cyprus

Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident, Band 25

Die vorliegende Studie beschäftigt sich mit sozialer Mobilität, Integration und Identitätskonstruktion unter den lateinischen, griechischen und christlich-orientalischen Eliten auf Zypern im 15. Jahrhundert. Die ehemals byzantinische Insel befand sich seit 1192 unter der Herrschaft der Kreuzfahrerdynastie der Lusignan, die einen fränkischen Adel mitgebracht hatte. Aufgrund verschiedener politischer und wirtschaftlicher Krisen konnten jedoch ab dem Ende des 14. Jahrhunderts verstärkt auch einheimische Griechen und orientalische Christen (sogenannte Syrer) im Rahmen der Staatsverwaltung aufsteigen und das Mächtegleichgewicht beeinflussen.
Auf der Basis einer prosopographischen Datenbank, die alle Mitglieder der Elite in Zypern zwischen 1374 und den 1460ern aufnimmt, widmet die Monographie sich sowohl den Aufstiegschancen der Syrer und Griechen als auch dem Schicksal der fränkischen Adeligen, die sich mit einer starken Gruppe von Aufsteigern arrangieren mussten. Sie analysiert die Folgen dieser dynamischen Entwicklung für die Beziehungen zwischen den verschiedenen Elite-Gruppen und untersucht, wie Syrer, Griechen und Lateiner ihre ethnischen, sozialen und religiösen Identitäten konstruierten und wie Veränderungen in diesen Konstruktionen mit dem Aufstieg der Syrer und Griechen in Beziehung gesetzt werden können. Diese zweifache Analyse von sozialer Dynamik und Identitätskonstruktion ermöglicht einen neuen, breiteren Blick auf die Entwicklung der zypriotischen Eliten im 15. Jahrhundert.

Beate Böhlendorf-Arslan (Hrsg.)

Veränderungen von Stadtbild und urbaner Lebenswelt in spätantiker und frühbyzantinischer Zeit
Assos im Spiegel städtischer Zentren Westkleinasiens

Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident, Band 23

Die Veränderung und Umstrukturierung der antiken Stadt in Kleinasien in spätantiker und frühbyzantinischer Zeit ist in den letzten Jahrzehnten zu einem zentralen Thema der archäologischen und historischen Forschung geworden. Die Beiträge dieses Bandes zeigen ein äußerst differenziertes Bild der Entwicklung von Städten und ihrem Umland in dieser Zeit. Einen idealen Ausgangspunkt dafür bildet die Stadt Assos an der Südküste der Troas, in der seit 2013 die Umgestaltung der antiken Stadt vom 4. bis zum 8. Jahrhundert im Zentrum der Untersuchungen steht. Das dort gewonnene Bild wird im vorliegenden Band durch Beiträge zu Pergamon, Sardis, Ephesos, Didyma und Sagalassos in einen weiteren Kontext gestellt, die den Entwicklungsprozess der spätantiken und frühbyzantinischen Städte Westkleinasiens auf ganz unterschiedliche Weise unter verschiedenen Aspekten beleuchten.

Beate Böhlendorf-Arslan, Robert Schick (Hrsg.)

Transformations of City and Countryside in the Byzantine Period

Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident, Band 22

Der Begriff der "Transformation" oder einfach "Umgestaltung" enthält sowohl die Elemente des Bleibenden, des Konservativen, den Kern des Fortbestehenden, als auch die Elemente des Veränderten, des Innovativen.

Im Rahmen dieser Publikation von Beiträgen einer Tagung aus dem Jahr 2016 zum Thema "Transformationen von Stadt und Land in byzantinischer Zeit" lenken wir die Aufmerksamkeit auf diese Dichotomie und untersuchen die soziale Dynamik hinter den Veränderungen des städtischen und ländlichen Lebens in byzantinischer Zeit, die sich durch Archäologie, Geschichte und Kunstgeschichte nachweisen lassen.

Das Byzantinische Reich ist ein idealer Gegenstand, um zu untersuchen, wie soziale Transformation abläuft, was sie auslöst, welche Faktoren ihr zugrunde liegen und welche Prozesse dabei ablaufen. Wer waren die Agenten der Transformation und wie veränderten sie und ihr Umfeld sich? Wie flexibel waren der Staat oder seine Bürger im Umgang mit externem und internem Innovationsdruck? Auf welche Weise und in welchem Maße konnten die Byzantiner im Zuge dieser Anpassungsprozesse ihre Identität und den inneren Zusammenhalt ihres Reiches bewahren?

Jessica Schmidt

Die spätbyzantinischen Wandmalereien des Theodor Daniel und Michael Veneris
Eine Untersuchung zu den Werken und der Vernetzung zweier kretischer Maler

Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident, Band 20

Kreta bietet für die spätbyzantinische Kunstgeschichte einen einzigartigen Denkmälerbestand. Der Zeitraum 1211 bis 1669, als die Insel unter venezianischer Herrschaft stand, ermöglicht Einblicke in ein facettenreiches und vielschichtiges Gesellschaftsgefüge. Innerhalb dieser einzigartigen Kunst- undKulturlandschaft sind die Arbeiten des spätbyzantinischen Kirchenmalers Theodor Daniel und seines Neffens Michael Veneris besonders hervorzuheben. Die vorliegende Publikation widmet sich erstmals einer umfassenden und breitgefächerten Untersuchung ihrer Werke. Neben der Identifizierung und Zuschreibung ihrer unsignierten Arbeiten stehen auch darauf aufbauende Untersuchungen im Fokus. Der zentrale Schritt für die genannten Zielsetzungen bildet die systematische Händescheidung der beiden. Diese und die Zuschreibung der unsignierten Werke erfolgen im ersten Teil der Publikation. Im zweiten Teil wird die Vernetzung von Theodor Daniel und Michael Veneris mit anderen kretischen Künstlern thematisiert. Neben einer Verbindung zu Ioannes Pagomenos, dem wohl prominentesten kretischen Kirchenmaler des 14. Jahrhunderts, gibt es noch eine Reihe weiterer Hinweise, die dafür sprechen, dass es ein regelrechtes Künstlernetzwerk auf der Insel gab.

Falko Daim et al. (Hrsg.)

Pilgrimage to Jerusalem. Journeys, Destinations, Experiences across Times and Cultures
Proceedings of the Conference held in Jerusalem, 5th to 7th December 2017

Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident, Band 19

Jerusalem ist eine Stadt, die drei Weltreligionen heilig ist: dem Judentum, dem Christentum und dem Islam. Seit frühbyzantinischer Zeit entwickelte sich die christliche Pilgerfahrt zu dieser und anderen heiligen Stätten zu einem "Massenphänomen". Tausende Christen machten sich auf den Weg zu heiligen Stätten in Palästina, Ägypten und anderen Orten, um die Heilsgeschichte physisch zu erleben und um göttliche Intervention in ihrem Leben zu suchen. Zahlreiche Reiseberichte, Pilgerführer und andere schriftliche Quellen heben wichtige Aspekte der Pilgerfahrt hervor. Darüber hinaus bieten uns viele gut erhaltene Kirchen, Klöster, Herbergen und andere Gebäude sowie die reichhaltigen archäologischen Funde, ein lebendiges Bild der Geschichte der Pilgerfahrt ins Heilige Land.

Athanassios Mailis

Obscured by Walls
The Bēma Display of the Cretan Churches from Visibility to Concealment

Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident, Band 18

Das Buch untersucht die Bēma-Darstellung der kretischen Kirchen im Zeitraum der byzantinischen Rückeroberung der Insel (11. Jahrhundert) bis zur Mitte der venezianischen Dominanz (15. Jahrhundert). Es konzentriert sich auf das Auftreten und die Verteilung der Templon-Barriere, die Funktion einer bestimmten  Gruppe von Fresken als Prostatio-Bilder und die (teilweise) Aufstellung von mit Fresken bemalten, gemauerten Altarraumabschrankungen in den orthodoxen Kirchen der Insel, kurz vor der Verbreitung der »hölzernen Ikonen-Wand« – bekannt als Ikonostase.
Diese Studie zeigt die künstlerische und kultische Vielfalt der Gestaltungen, bestehend aus Archaismus und Modernisierung, bis zur Herauskristallisierung der Ikonostase als »charakteristisches Merkmal der Kirchen des byzantinischen Ritus« und damit als materieller Beweis für die kulturelle Identität und das religiöse Bewusstsein der orthodoxen Bevölkerung in einem Gebiet (Kreta) und einer Zeit (venezianische Herrschaft), die sowohl von Osmose als auch von Konflikten geprägt ist.

Ludger Körntgen, Jan Kusber, Johannes Pahlitzsch, Filippo Carlà-Uhink (Hrsg.)

Byzanz und seine europäischen Nachbarn
Politische Interdependenzen und kulturelle Missverständnisse

Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident, Band 17

Kulturelle Missverständnisse stellen einerseits eine Grundbedingung interkultureller Kommunikation dar, können andererseits aber auch als Modus oder Ergebnis von Interkulturalität und transkulturellen Beziehungen verstanden werden. Dabei gibt es sowohl unreflektierte als auch provozierte oder politisch ausgenutzte Missverständnisse bzw. vermeintliche Missverständnisse, die reale politische oder kirchenpolitische Interessensgegensätze verdecken, wie auch Missverständnisse der Forschung, die mitunter vorschnell ein Missverständnis konstatiert, wo Logik und Sinnzusammenhang sich nicht sofort erschließen. Derlei Missverständnisse bestimmten das politisch-kulturelle Beziehungsgefüge zwischen Byzanz, dem lateinisch geprägten Westen und der slavischen Welt, die sich allesamt als Teile der christlichen Ökumene begriffen und über viele Jahrhunderte in engem politischen und kulturellen Kontakt standen. Der Untersuchung dieses Phänomens widmen sich im vorliegenden Band Vertreterinnen und Vertreter von Geschichtswissenschaft, Byzantinistik, Kunstgeschichte und Theologie.

Martina Horn

Adam-und-Eva-Erzählungen im Bildprogramm kretischer Kirchen
Eine ikonographische und kulturhistorische Objekt- und Bildfindungsanalyse

Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident, Band 16

Die westliche sakrale Kunstlandschaft des Mittelalters präsentiert ein reiches, gattungsübergreifendes Bildrepertoire an Adam-und-Eva-Erzählungen. In der ostkirchlichen Monumentalmalerei hingegen findet die Thematik erst in postbyzantinischer Zeit Aufnahme in die Bildprogramme der Kirchen. Umso bemerkenswerter ist die innovative Genese von Adam-und-Eva-Zyklen im venezianisch beherrschten Kreta des 14. und 15. Jahrhunderts. In fünf der überaus zahlreichen ausgemalten kretischen Kirchen werden Bildsequenzen mit den Ureltern in das ikonographische Konzept integriert. Neben der Rekonstruktion der teilweise zerstörten Fresken erfolgt in dieser kunst- und kulturhistorisch orientierten Arbeit eine umfassende Bildfindungsanalyse, die durch das Spannungsfeld von Bewahrungstendenzen traditioneller Bildbausteine und Freiräumen für kreative Neuschöpfungen normiert ist. Die weitgefächerten, westliche und östliche Kunsttradition einbeziehenden Recherchen bieten nicht nur überraschende Einblicke in außergewöhnliche Bildformulierungen, sondern auch in die variierenden stifterorientierten Motivationsgründe für die kirchenindividuelle Rezeption des Sujets.

Falko Daim, Neslihan Asutay-Effenberger (Hrsg.)

Sasanidische Spuren in der byzantinischen, kaukasischen und islamischen Kunst und Kultur
Sasanian Elements in Byzantine, Caucasian and Islamic Art and Culture

Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident, Band 15

Das Reich der persischen Sasaniden (224-651 n. Chr.) erstreckte sich über Gebiete des heutigen Iran, Irak, Aserbaidschan, Pakistan und Afghanistan. Auch die Kaukasusregionen standen unter seinem politischen Einfluss. Viele Elemente der sasanidischen Kunst und Kultur sind in angrenzenden Ländern wie Byzanz oder dem christlichen Kaukasus zu finden und lebten nach dem Untergang der Sasaniden in den islamischen Herrschaftsgebieten fort, die auf ihrem einstigen Territorium entstanden waren.
Um die fortwirkende Rolle der sasanidischen Perser und ihrer Kultur zu untersuchen, fand im September 2017 eine internationale Tagung im Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseum in Mainz statt. Die von WissenschaftlerInnen aus unterschiedlichen Disziplinen gehaltenen Beiträge werden in dem vorliegenden Band publiziert. 

Max Ritter

Zwischen Glaube und Geld
Zur Ökonomie des byzantinischen Pilgerwesens (4.-12. Jh.)

Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident, Band 14

Frömmigkeit ist nicht die alleinige Triebfeder für die Entwicklung des christlichen Pilgerwesens. Das Buch behandelt in einer weiten chronologischen und räumlichen Perspektive die ökonomischen Zusammenhänge, die auf das byzantinische Pilgerwesen (5.-12. Jh.) einwirkten.
Das Pilgern ist stets religiös motiviert und sozial eingebettet, doch die nähere Auswahl des Pilgerziels, die Pilgerroute, die Dankesgaben bei der Ankunft und vieles andere mehr wurden und werden durch ökonomische Grundkonstanten und zeitabhängige sozioökonomische Dynamiken bestimmt.
Das Buch beleuchtet die byzantinischen Pilgerheiligtümer, untersucht ihre Genese, aber auch ihre Organisations- und Finanzierungsstruktur, die bereits in der Spätantike durch Gesetze gerahmt wurde.

Antje Bosselmann-Ruickbie (Hrsg.)

New Research on Late Byzantine Goldsmiths’ Works (13th-15th Centuries)
Neue Forschungen zur spätbyzantinischen Goldschmiedekunst (13.-15. Jahrhundert)

Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident, Band 13

Dieser Band umfasst 13 Vorträge der Konferenz »New Research on Late Byzantine Goldsmiths‘ Works (13th-15th Centuries) – Neue Forschungen zur spätbyzantinischen Goldschmiedekunst (13.-15. Jahrhundert)«, die im Oktober 2015 im Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseum in Mainz stattfand. Die Beiträge beschäftigen sich mit der materiellen Kultur der spätbyzantinischen Goldschmiedekunst, z.B. Kreuze, Reliquiare, Schmuck, Emailarbeiten und Edelsteine, und spannen einen weiten geographischen Rahmen von Byzanz zu vielen seiner Nachbarn wie Russland, Trapezunt, Serbien und Kreta. Darüber hinaus liefern schriftliche Quellen zu byzantinischen Goldschmieden, ihrem Handwerk und der Herkunft von Edelmetallen Hinweise auf die Goldschmiedekunst in Byzanz während seiner langen Geschichte.

Zachary Chitwood, Johannes Pahlitzsch (Hrsg.)

Ambassadors, Artists, Theologians
Byzantine Relations with the Near East from the Ninth to the Thirteenth Centuries

Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident, Band 12

Die Autoren des Sammelbandes »Ambassadors, Artists, Theologians: Byzantine Relations with the Near East from the Ninth to the Thirteenth Centuries« untersuchen die komplexe Dynamik zwischen dem Byzantinischen Reich und dem Nahen Osten.
Die hier gesammelten Beiträge gehen über die Tradition des histoire événementielle hinaus und verdeutlichen den Übergang künstlerischer Praktiken, Ideen und Gesprächspartner zwischen Byzanz und der islamischen Welt. Auf diese Weise versucht dieser Band, unser Verständnis der Beziehung zwischen diesen beiden mittelalterlichen Kulturbereichen zu nuancieren und zu kontextualisieren.

Alena Alshanskaya, Andreas Gietzen, Christina Hadjiafxenti (Hrsg.)

Imagining Byzantium
Perceptions, Patterns, Problems

Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident, Band 11

Byzanz das Andere. Byzanz das Pompöse. Byzanz das Ewige. Die bloße Existenz dieses Reiches mit seiner reichen Geschichte und seiner Andersartigkeit zu westeuropäischen Traditionen beflügelte den Geist von Gelehrten, Adligen, Politikern und den einfachen Menschen während seines Andauerns bis weit über seinen Untergang im Jahr 1453 hinaus. Schriftsteller der Aufklärung  vernachlässigten den weitreichenden politischen und kulturellen Einfluss von Byzanz auf seine Nachbarländer und beraubten dem Reich darüber hinaus seiner ursprünglichen historischen Realität. So wurde ein Modell geschaffen, das in allzu unterschiedlichen Konstrukten verwendet werden konnte und sich von positiven bis zu höchst negativen Konnotationen erstreckte. Mit dem Aufkommen neuer Nationalismen, vor allem in Ost- und Südosteuropa und den damit verbundenen politisch inspirierten historischen (Re-) Konstruktionen im 19. und 20. Jahrhundert gewann die Rezeption und die Wahrnehmung von Byzanz neue Facetten. In diesem Band möchten wir diese Muster und die damit verbundenen Probleme näher beleuchten sowie die verschiedenen Arten aufzeigen, wie »Byzanz« als Argumentationsgrundlage für die Nationsbildung und die Konstruktion neuer historiographischer Erzählungen verwendet wurde und wie darüber hinaus sein Erbe in der kirchlichen Geschichtsschreibung fortdauerte.

Despoina Ariantzi, Ina Eichner (Hrsg.)

Für Seelenheil und Lebensglück
Das byzantinische Pilgerwesen und seine Wurzeln

Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident, Band 10

Die internationale Abschlusskonferenz des Projekts »Für Seelenheil und Lebensglück. Das byzantinische Pilgerwesen und seine Wurzeln« vom Dezember 2015 versammelte Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler aus den Disziplinen von Archäologie, Byzantinistik, Kunstgeschichte,  Geschichtswissenschaften, Religionsgeschichte, Epigraphik und Historischer Geographie, die sich dem Phänomen der Pilgerfahrt im Byzantinischen Reich widmeten.
Die Beiträge erörtern die Zusammenhänge des byzantinischen Pilgerwesens mit der heidnischen und jüdischen Pilgerfahrt. Vor allem aber präsentieren und diskutieren sie die Praxis des Pilgerwesens zwischen »Kult und Kommerz« im sakraltopographischen und landschaftlichen Kontext einzelner Regionen und Orte des Byzantinischen Reiches von Ägypten bis Bulgarien und von Süditalien bis zum Heiligen Land.

Falko Daim, Christian Gastgeber, Dominik Heher, Claudia Rapp (Hrsg.)

Menschen, Bilder, Sprache, Dinge
Wege der Kommunikation zwischen Byzanz und dem Westen 2: Menschen und Worte

Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident, Band 9.2

2018 zeigt das Römisch-Germanische Zentralmuseum Mainz in Zusammenarbeit mit der Schallaburg in dem prachtvollen Renaissanceschloss nahe Melk (Niederösterreich) die Ausstellung »Byzanz & der Westen. lOOO vergessene Jahre«.
Beide, Byzanz und der europäische Westen, entspringen dem römischen Weltreich, doch nehmen sie schon ab der Spätantike unterschiedliche Entwicklungen. Während das Römische Reich im Osten Bestand hatte und nahtlos in das Byzantinische Reich des Mittelalters überging, traten im Westen gentile Herrschaften an dessen Stelle, Königreiche der Goten, Vandalen, Angelsachsen, Langobarden und Franken. Zwar blieb Byzanz zumindest 800 Jahre lang für die anderen europäischen Entitäten respektierte oder akzeptierte Großmacht, doch kam es sehr schnell zu Gebietsstreitigkeiten, Zwistigkeiten und kulturellen Differenzen. Zudem wurde die Verständigung immer schwieriger - im »orthodoxen« Osten war Griechisch Verkehrssprache, im »katholischen« Westen Latein die lingua franca. Unterschiede in Liturgie und Glaubensfragen verstärkten die Differenzen oder wurden (religions)politisch zur Betonung der Verschiedenheit sogar noch unterstrichen. Aber immer noch bewunderte man das »reiche Konstantinopel« und die byzantinischen Schätze - darunter die herrlichen Seiden, Elfenbeinreliefs, technische Wunderwerke, die vielen Reliquien, grandiose Bauwerke.
Die Wende kam 1204 mit der Eroberung und Plünderung Konstantinopels durch die Kreuzfahrer. Für das bereits vorher geschwächte Byzantinische Reich bedeutete diese Katastrophe eine völlige neue Situation als ein Exilreich, dessen Kaiser und Patriarch nach Kleinasien ausweichen mussten. In einem Großteil des ehemals europäischen Byzantinischen Reiches machten sich Kreuzfahrerstaaten breit; Venedig und Genua, die durch Sonderverträge schon zuvor als Handelsmächte stark präsent waren, wurden zu bestimmenden Faktoren der westlichen Mächte im Osten.
Anlässlich dieser Schau erscheinen zwei Begleitbände mit insgesamt 41 Beiträgen zu den ebenso vielfältigen wie wechselhaften Beziehungen zwischen dem lateinischen Westen und dem Byzantinischen Reich. Die Bände sind nach den Medien der Kommunikation strukturiert: Menschen, Bilder, Sprache, Dinge. Sie versammeln Beiträge namhafter Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler mit archäologischer, kunsthistorischer, philologischer und historischer Schwerpunktsetzung. Mehrere Überblicksdarstellungen und Detailstudien schöpfen aus Forschungsprojekten des Leibniz-WissenschaftsCampus Mainz: Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident sowie dem Schwerpunkt Byzanzforschung und Mittelalterforschung der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften in Wien.

Falko Daim, Dominik Heher, Claudia Rapp (Hrsg.)

Menschen, Bilder, Sprache, Dinge
Wege der Kommunikation zwischen Byzanz und dem Westen 1: Bilder und Dinge

Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident, Band 9.1

2018 zeigt das Römisch-Germanische Zentralmuseum Mainz in Zusammenarbeit mit der Schallaburg in dem prachtvollen Renaissanceschloss nahe Melk (Niederösterreich) die Ausstellung »Byzanz & der Westen. 1000 vergessene Jahre«. Beide, Byzanz und der europäische Westen, entspringen dem römischen Weltreich, doch nehmen sie schon ab dem 5. Jahrhundert unterschiedliche Entwicklungen. Während das Römische Reich im Osten Bestand hatte und sich zum Byzantinischen Reich des Mittelalters wandelte, traten im Westen gentile Herrschaften an dessen Stelle, Königreiche der Goten, Vandalen, Angelsachsen, Langobarden und Franken. Zwar blieb Byzanz zumindest 800 Jahre lang das Vorbild für die anderen europäischen Entitäten, doch kam es sehr schnell zu Missverständnissen, Meinungsverschiedenheiten und Zwistigkeiten. Die Verständigung wurde immer schwieriger – im orthodoxen Osten sprach man zumeist Griechisch, im katholischen Westen war die Verkehrssprache Latein. Auch bei der Auslegung des christlichen Glaubens war man sich zusehends uneinig. Aber immer noch bewunderte man die byzantinischen Schätze – die herrlichen Seiden, Elfenbeinreliefs, technische Wunderwerke, die vielen Reliquien, grandiose Bauwerke.

Die Wende kam 1204 mit der Eroberung und Plünderung Konstantinopels durch die Bischöfe und Ritter des Vierten Kreuzzugs. Für das bereits vorher geschwächte Byzantinische Reich bedeutete diese Katastrophe den Abstieg in die zweite politische Liga. Im Osten machten sich Kreuzfahrerstaaten breit, Venedig und Genua waren schon früher im Handel erfolgreich, jetzt hatten sie praktisch die alleinige Kontrolle.

Anlässlich dieser Schau erscheinen drei Begleitbände mit insgesamt 40 Beiträgen zu den ebenso vielfältigen wie wechselhaften Beziehungen zwischen dem lateinischen Westen und dem Byzantinischen Reich. Die Bände sind nach den Medien der Kommunikation strukturiert: Menschen, Bilder, Sprache, Dinge. Sie versammeln Beiträge namhafter Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler mit archäologischer, kunsthistorischer, philologischer und historischer Schwerpunktsetzung. Das vielschichtige Bild an Überblicksdarstellungen und Detailstudien gewinnt zusätzlichen Wert durch teils erstmals veröffentlichte Ergebnisse aktueller Forschungsprojekte, vornehmlich des Leibniz-WissenschaftsCampus Mainz: Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident sowie der byzantinistischen Forschungseinrichtungen in Wien.

Petra Linscheid

Spätantike und Byzanz. Bestandskatalog Badisches Landesmuseum Karlsruhe
Textilien

Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident, Band 8.2

Textilfunde aus dem frühbyzantinischen Ägypten stellen die umfangreichste Gattung unter den byzantinischen Artefakten des Badischen Landesmuseums Karlsruhe. Insgesamt 207 Objekte, darunter Tuniken, Kopfbedeckungen, Polsterstoffe, Decken und Vorhänge, vermitteln einen lebendigen Eindruck vom Aussehen frühbyzantinischer Kleidung und textiler Raumausstattung. In einem ausführlichen Katalogteil und einleitenden Kapiteln finden besonders die Herstellungstechnik und die Funktionsbestimmung der Textilien Beachtung. Mit wenigen Ausnahmen waren die Objekte bisher unveröffentlicht.

Falko Daim, Benjamin Fourlas, Katarina Horst, Vasiliki Tsamakda (Hrsg.)

Spätantike und Byzanz. Bestandskatalog Badisches Landesmuseum Karlsruhe
Objekte aus Bein, Elfenbein, Glas, Keramik, Metall und Stein

Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident, Band 8.1

Die Sammlung des Badischen Landesmuseums Karlsruhe birgt einen umfangreichen Bestand an spätantiken und byzantinischen Objekten, der bislang nur in Teilen durch Publikationen zugänglich war. Bei den Artefakten und Kunstwerken handelt es sich vornehmlich um kleinformatige Gegenstände von z.T. hohem wissenschaftlichem Wert. Sie sind sowohl dem sakralen wie dem profanen Bereich zugehörig und vermitteln ein breites Spektrum des Alltagslebens sowie des Kunst- und Kulturschaffens im spätrömischen bzw. Byzantinischen Reich. Die 268 Objekte aus Bein, Elfenbein, Glas, Keramik, Metall und Stein, darunter auch einige mit Inschriften, werden in dem Bestandskatalog grundlegend dokumentiert, interpretiert und kulturgeschichtlich eingeordnet.

Vlastimil Drbal

Pilgerfahrt im spätantiken Nahen Osten (3./4. - 8. Jahrhundert)
Paganes, christliches, jüdisches und islamisches Pilgerwesen. Fragen der Kontinuitäten

Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident, Band 7

Das Phänomen des spätantiken Pilgerwesens im Nahen Osten wird oft mit dem Entstehen der christlichen Pilgerfahrt gleichgesetzt. Das christliche Pilgerwesen war aber nur ein – wenn auch bedeutender – Teil der nahöstlichen Pilgertradition. Es konkurrierte mit den älteren Traditionen des jüdischen Pilgerwesens in Palästina und der paganen Pilgerfahrt im pharaonischen Ägypten auf der einen Seite und mit der gleichfalls insbesondere auf Jerusalem fokussierten frühislamischen Pilgerfahrt auf der anderen Seite. Diese verschiedenen Pilgertraditionen, die sich gleichzeitig an einem Ort (vor allem in Jerusalem, aber auch in zahlreichen kleineren Pilgerzentren) beobachten lassen, stehen im Zentrum dieser Untersuchung.

Rainer Schreg et al.

A Most Pleasant Scene and an Inexhaustible Resource Steps Towards a Byzantine Environmental History
Interdisciplinary Conference November 17th and 18th 2011 in Mainz

Henriette Baron, Falko Daim (Hrsg.)
Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident, Band 6

Was wissen wir über die Umwelten, in denen sich das Byzantinische Reich im östlichen Mittelmeerraum entfaltete? Wie wurden sie wahrgenommen und wie prägten sich Mensch und Umwelt im Laufe des byzantinischen Jahrtausends (395-1453 n. Chr.) gegenseitig? Welche Zugangswege wurden bisher erprobt, um diese Wechselwirkungen zu ergründen? Und wie könnte eine weitere umweltgeschichtliche Forschungsagenda aussehen?
Diese Fragen standen im Zentrum einer interdisziplinären Tagung, die am 17. und 18. November 2011 in Mainz stattfand. Dieser Tagungsband versammelt Beiträge von Forschern, die sich diesen Fragen von ganz unterschiedlichen Blickwinkeln genähert haben. Sie richten ihr Augenmerk auf das Aussagepotenzial traditioneller wie auch »neuer« Quellen und Methoden der Byzantinistik und Byzantinischen Archäologie für diese bislang noch wenig ergründete Sphäre. Dabei wird sichtbar, wie eng die Umweltgeschichte mit klassischen Themen der Byzanzforschung – seien sie wirtschafts-, sozial- oder kulturgeschichtlicher Natur – verwoben ist.

 

Thomas Guttandin et al.

Schiffe und ihr Kontext
Darstellungen, Modelle, Bestandteile – von der Bronzezeit bis zum Ende des Byzantinischen Reiches

Heide Frielinghaus, Thomas Schmidts, Vasiliki Tsamakda (Hrsg.)
Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident, Band 5

Die Schifffahrt war in Antike und Mittelalter von herausragender Bedeutung für Wirtschaft und Herrschaftsausübung. Sie ermöglichte darüber hinaus Kontakte zwischen weit entfernten Räumen. Schiffe als maßgebliche Objekte wurden zum einen dekoriert und ausgeschmückt, zum anderen waren sie auch häufig Gegenstand von Abbildungen. Dabei reicht die Spannweite vom skizzenhaften Graffito bis zur dreidimensionalen Wiedergabe. Die Kontexte der Darstellungen umfassen so unterschiedliche Bereiche wie die öffentliche und private Repräsentation sowie die Religion.
Der Band versammelt 18 Beiträge, die im Rahmen eines internationalen Workshops im Jahre 2013 in Mainz präsentiert wurden. Für den Zeitraum von der Bronzezeit bis zum Ende des Byzantinischen Reiches werden verschiedene Materialgruppen untersucht sowie schiffbauliche und nautische Entwicklungen dargestellt. Ein  Schwerpunkt liegt dabei auf den Darstellungen von Schiffen, die in ihrer Vielschichtigkeit bislang kaum erforscht sind.

Ewald Kislinger et al.

Die byzantinischen Häfen Konstantinopels

Falko Daim (Hrsg.)
Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident, Band 4

Die Geschicke des byzantinischen Konstantinopel waren stets untrennbar mit dem Meer verbunden. Die topographische, demographische und wirtschaftliche Entwicklung der Stadt spiegelt sich in der Geschichte ihrer Häfen, die erstmalig im vorliegenden Band in ihrer Gesamtheit behandelt wird.
Zwölf Untersuchungen zu den Häfen und Anlegestellen der Stadt am Marmarameer und am Goldenen Horn – aber auch zu jenen in ihrem europäischen und asiatischen Vorfeld – schaffen unter Auswertung schriftlicher, bildlicher und archäologischer Quellen eine Synthese des aktuellen Forschungsstandes

John Haldon et al.

Hinter den Mauern und auf dem offenen Land
Leben im Byzantinischen Reich

Falko Daim, Jörg Drauschke (Hrsg.)
Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident, Band 3

Wie lebten die Menschen im Byzantinischen Reich, wie gestaltete sich ihre Lebenswirklichkeit in den Städten und auf dem Land? Was war jeweils anders? Es lohnt sich, diese Frage aus interdisziplinärer Perspektive zu stellen.
Die Ausstellung „Byzanz – Pracht und Alltag“ der Kunst- und Ausstellungshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland in Bonn und des Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseums (26.2.-13.6.2010) eröffnete für die Byzanzforschung neue Perspektiven. Die begleitende Tagung “Hinter den Mauern und auf dem offenen Land: Neue Forschungen zum Leben im Byzantinischen Reich” nahm diesen Ansatz auf und vertiefte im interdisziplinären Rahmen die Themen der Ausstellung. Im Mittelpunkt stand dabei das Alltagsleben innerhalb der urbanen und ländlichen Regionen des Reiches. Die Beiträge des Bandes führen die Ergebnisse der Mainzer Tagung zusammen. Sie widmen sich der Hauptstadt Konstantinopel, den Städten und ihrem Umland auf dem Balkan und in Kleinasien sowie dem alltäglichen Leben zur See, in Klöstern und auf dem Land.

Anastassios Ch. Antonaras

Arts, Crafts and Trades in Ancient and Byzantine Thessaloniki
Archaeological, Literary and Epigraphic Evidence

Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident, Band 2

Zum ersten Mal werden das Handwerk und Kunsthandwerk Thessalonikis, ehemals die zweitgrößte Stadt des byzantinischen Reiches nach Konstantinopel, untersucht und die archäologischen, historischen und epigraphischen Quellen ausgewertet.

Über 80 Jahre archäologische und lebenslange persönliche Forschungen zu 112 Ausgrabungen geben detaillierte Hinweise auf mindestens 16 Handwerke. Das Buch ist chronologisch aufgebaut und umfasst auch Überblicke über die politische Geschichte und Topographie Thessalonikis für den Zeitraum der ersten 19 Jahrhunderte der Stadtgeschichte. Durch den bebilderten Katalog zu jeder Ausgrabungsstätte sowie Fundkarten eröffnet dieses Werk unbekannte Aspekte des Alltagslebens in der Antike, der frühchristlichen und byzantinischen Zeit.

Der Titel wurde 2019 neu aufgelegt Anastassios Ch. Antonaras: Arts, Crafts and Trades in Ancient and Byzantine Thessaloniki Archaeological, Literary and Epigraphic Evidence.

Anastassios Ch. Antonaras

Arts, Crafts and Trades in Ancient and Byzantine Thessaloniki
Archaeological, Literary and Epigraphic Evidence

Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident, Band 2

Zum ersten Mal werden das Handwerk und Kunsthandwerk Thessalonikis, ehemals die zweitgrößte Stadt des byzantinischen Reiches nach Konstantinopel, untersucht und die archäologischen, historischen und epigraphischen Quellen ausgewertet.

Über 80 Jahre archäologische und lebenslange persönliche Forschungen zu 112 Ausgrabungen geben detaillierte Hinweise auf mindestens 16 Handwerke. Das Buch ist chronologisch aufgebaut und umfasst auch Überblicke über die politische Geschichte und Topographie Thessalonikis für den Zeitraum der ersten 19 Jahrhunderte der Stadtgeschichte. Durch den bebilderten Katalog zu jeder Ausgrabungsstätte sowie Fundkarten eröffnet dieses Werk unbekannte Aspekte des Alltagslebens in der Antike, der frühchristlichen und byzantinischen Zeit.

Leicht veränderte Neuauflage zu Anastassios Ch. Antonaras: Arts, Crafts and Trades in Ancient and Byzantine Thessaloniki Archaeological, Literary and Epigraphic Evidence von 2016

Neslihan Asutay-Effenberger, Falko Daim (Hrsg.)

Der Doppeladler
Byzanz und die Seldschuken in Anatolien vom späten 11. bis zum 13. Jahrhundert

Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident, Band 1

Das nach der für die Byzantiner vernichtenden Schlacht bei Manzikert 1071 im zuvor byzantinischen Anatolien entstandene Reich der Rum-Seldschuken war bis zu seiner Auflösung Anfang des 14. Jahrhunderts der wichtigste Nachbar der Byzantiner an ihrer Ostgrenze. Das Reich der Rum-Seldschuken vereinte Seldschuken wie griechisch-orthodoxe Einwohner und stand schon daher in einem intensiven Kontakt mit Byzanz, der sich vor allem in Handel, im Austausch von Kunstschaffenden und in Eheschließungen manifestierte. Diese sozialen und politischen Beziehungen sowie die durch ethnische und religiöse Toleranz geprägte Koexistenz der verschiedenen Völkerschaften innerhalb des Seldschukenreiches waren Grundlage für große Kunst. Gleichwohl wissen wir heute nur wenig über die Rum-Seldschuken und ihr Interagieren mit den Byzantinern, sodass bisweilen der Eindruck vorherrscht, es habe kaum einen kulturellen Austausch gegeben.
Der Tagungsband legt die Ergebnisse einer interdisziplinären Tagung vor, die vom 1. bis  zum 3. Oktober 2010 im Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseum Mainz stattfand, um diesem Eindruck die Grundlage zu entziehen und um eine Diskussion über die Probleme der byzantinisch-seldschukischen Beziehungen zu eröffnen.