Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Finding the Limits of the Limes: Modelling Demography, Economy and Transport on the Edge of the Roman Empire

Finding the Limits of the Limes: Modelling Demography, Economy and Transport on the Edge of the Roman Empire
  • Philip Verhagen
  • Jamie Joyce
  • Mark R. Groenhuijzen
Open Access
 Book

Introduction

This open access book demonstrates the application of simulation modelling and network analysis techniques in the field of Roman studies. It summarizes and discusses the results of a 5-year research project carried out by the editors that aimed to apply spatial dynamical modelling to reconstruct and understand the socio-economic development of the Dutch part of the Roman frontier (limes) zone, in particular the agrarian economy and the related development of settlement patterns and transport networks in the area. The project papers are accompanied by invited chapters presenting case studies and reflections from other parts of the Roman Empire focusing on the themes of subsistence economy, demography, transport and mobility, and socio-economic networks in the Roman period.
The book shows the added value of state-of-the-art computer modelling techniques and bridges computational and conventional approaches. Topics that will be of particular interest to archaeologists are the question of (forced) surplus production, the demographic and economic effects of the Roman occupation on the local population, and the structuring of transport networks and settlement patterns. For modellers, issues of sensitivity analysis and validation of modelling results are specifically addressed. This book will appeal to students and researchers working in the computational humanities and social sciences, in particular, archaeology and ancient history.

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xvi
  2. Philip Verhagen, Jamie Joyce, Mark R. Groenhuijzen
    Pages 1-19 Open Access
  3. Demography and Settlement

  4. Economy

  5. Transport and Movement

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 215-215
    2. Philip Verhagen, Laure Nuninger, Mark R. Groenhuijzen
      Pages 217-249 Open Access
    3. César Parcero-Oubiña, Alejandro Güimil-Fariña, João Fonte, José Manuel Costa-García
      Pages 291-311 Open Access
    4. Katherine A. Crawford
      Pages 313-327 Open Access
  6. Back Matter
    Pages 329-337

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

New in the Open Monograph Series Archéo.doct

New in the Open Monograph Series Archéo.doct

AXON: Silloge di Iscrizione Storiche Greche

[First posted in AWOL 27 January 2016, updated (new URLs) 19 February 2019]

AXON: Silloge di Iscrizione Storiche Greche / Greek Historical Inscriptios
Axon Project aims to offer a selection of Greek inscriptions, from the birth of the polis in the Archaic Age to 31 BC. The documents are provided with complete lemma and critical apparatus, information about date and place of their discovery, Italian translation, commentary, and updated bibliography. This digital anthology has been selected according to a broader notion of ‘historical’ inscription, which includes those documents relevant not only for their political and institutional contents, but also for the social as well as cultural issues they display.
Specific queries can be carried out with our Search functions, browsing the entire collection and using the interactive Map.
The Project is patronised by Istituto Italiano per la Storia Antica and has an affiliation agreement with Europeana EAGLE Project.
Il Progetto AXON nasce in seno alla Sezione Greca del Laboratorio di Epigrafia Greca diretta da Claudia Antonetti e trova in esso la sua sede scientifica ed operativa. Esso è stato finanziato dall’Università Ca’ Foscari nel quadro dei Progetti di Ateneo (PRA) 2013 e come tale è coordinato da Stefania De Vido.
AXON intende presentare una silloge di iscrizioni greche selezionate in base alla loro rilevanza ‘storica’, valorizzando il documento epigrafico quale fonte indispensabile non solo per la ricostruzione dei diversi aspetti della storia politica o istituzionale del mondo greco, ma anche come fondamentale risorsa per l’indagine diretta a numerosi temi di storia sociale e culturale. Accogliendo tale accezione ‘ampia’ di iscrizione storica, la silloge abbraccia un arco temporale particolarmente esteso, dalla nascita della polis al 31 a.C., corrispondente ai termini convenzionalmente impiegati nella didattica per definire la ‘storia greca’.

New Open Access Journal: New Classicists

New Classicists
New Classicists 01
New Classicists is an online periodical aimed at providing a publication platform for postgraduate students in any field that relates to the Classical World.  Our advisory board members aid in sourcing international academics for the two person, blind peer reviewing of each accepted article before publication.
To begin with, there will be two publications a year, February and September, starting in February 2019.  Thanks to generous funding from the Classics department at King's College London, the journal will now be an open access publication.
If you are a postgraduate student of any recognised institution, or are within two years of completing a degree, and you would like to have an article peer reviewed and published, please submit a finished draft of up to 5000 words, along with a short abstract.  Articles can be submitted at any time during the year, but the peer reviewing process can take up to three months so bear this in mind if you want your article included in a particular edition.  Please use the Harvard referencing style for modern sources and the Oxford style for ancient sources, with footnotes, if required, at the bottom of each page.  For more information, please see this referencing guide.

Each article will be assessed for suitability and an outcome will be forwarded to you within two weeks of this date.
We are also looking for book reviews of recent Classical books.  Please contact the editor for more information if you would like to submit a book review.
In the meantime, please follow us on our social media sites and spread the word to your fellow postgrad students and friends!


 

Monday, February 18, 2019

Newly added in the Open Textbook Library

Newly added in the Open Textbook Library
Read more about Greek and Latin Roots: Part I - Latin

Greek and Latin Roots: Part I - Latin

Peter Smith, University of Victoria

Greek and Latin Roots: Part I - Latin is part one of a two part series. This series examines the systematic principles by which a large portion of English vocabulary has evolved from Latin and (to a lesser degree) from Greek. This book focuses on Latin roots. A link to the second part focusing on the Greek roots can be found below. Part I will try to impart some skill in the recognition and proper use of words derived from Latin. There is a stress on principles: although students will be continually looking at interesting individual words, their constant aim will be to discover predictable general patterns of historical development, so that they may be able to cope with new and unfamiliar words of any type that they have studied. They will be shown how to approach the problem by a procedure known as “word analysis,” which is roughly comparable to the dissection of an interesting specimen in the biology laboratory. The text assumes no previous knowledge of Latin, and does not involve the grammatical study of this language—except for a few basic features of noun and verb formation that will help students to understand the Latin legacy in English. Although there will be some attention paid to the historical interaction of Latin with English, this text is definitely not a systematic history of the English language. It focuses on only those elements within English that have been directly or indirectly affected by this classical language. In order to provide the broadest possible service to students, the text emphasizes standard English vocabulary in current use. The more exotic technical vocabulary of science and medicine can be extremely interesting, but is explored in only summary fashion. Nevertheless, this text should be of considerable value, say, to a would-be botanist or medical doctor, if only by providing the foundation for further specialized enquiry.


(1 review
Read more about Greek and Latin Roots: Part II - Greek

Greek and Latin Roots: Part II - Greek

Peter Smith, University of Victoria

Greek and Latin Roots: Part II - Greek is part two of a two part series. This series examines the systematic principles by which a large portion of English vocabulary has evolved from Latin and (to a lesser degree) from Greek. This book focuses on Greek roots. A link to the first part focusing on the Latin roots can be found below. Part II will try to impart some skill in the recognition and proper use of words derived from Greek. There is a stress on principles: although students will be continually looking at interesting individual words, their constant aim will be to discover predictable general patterns of historical development, so that they may be able to cope with new and unfamiliar words of any type that they have studied. They will be shown how to approach the problem by a procedure known as “word analysis,” which is roughly comparable to the dissection of an interesting specimen in the biology laboratory. The text assumes no previous knowledge of Greek, and does not involve the grammatical study of this language—except for a few basic features of noun and verb formation that will help students to understand the Greek legacy in English. All students will be asked to learn the Greek alphabet. This skill is not absolutely essential for a general knowledge of Greek roots in English. However, it will help students understand a number of otherwise puzzling features of spelling and usage. Although there will be some attention paid to the historical interaction of Greek with English, this text is definitely not a systematic history of the English language. It focuses on only those elements within English that have been directly or indirectly affected by this classical language. In order to provide the broadest possible service to students, the text emphasizes standard English vocabulary in current use. The more exotic technical vocabulary of science and medicine can be extremely interesting, but is explored in only summary fashion. Nevertheless, this text should be of considerable value, say, to a would-be botanist or medical doctor, if only by providing the foundation for further specialized enquiry.

No ratings
(0 reviews)
Read more about Intermediate Biblical Greek Reader: Galatians and Related Texts

Intermediate Biblical Greek Reader: Galatians and Related Texts

Nijay Gupta, Portland Seminary
Jonah Sandford

After completing basic biblical Greek, students are often eager to continue to learn and strengthen their skills of translation and interpretation. This intermediate graded reader is designed to meet those needs. The reader is “intermediate” in the sense that it presumes the user will have already learned the basics of Greek grammar and syntax and has memorized Greek vocabulary words that appear frequently in the New Testament. The reader is “graded” in the sense that it moves from simpler translation work (Galatians) towards more advanced readings from the book of James, the Septuagint, and from one of the Church Fathers. In each reading lesson, the Greek text is given, followed by supplemental notes that offer help with vocabulary, challenging word forms, and syntax. Discussion questions are also included to foster group conversation and engagement. There are many good Greek readers in existence, but this reader differs from most others in a few important ways. Most readers offer text selections from different parts of the Bible, but in this reader the user works through one entire book (Galatians). All subsequent lessons, then, build off of this interaction with Galatians through short readings that are in some way related to Galatians. The Septuagint passages in the reader offer some broader context for texts that Paul quotes explicitly from the Septuagint. The Patristic reading from John Chrysystom comes from one of his homilies on Galatians. This approach to a Greek reader allows for both variety and coherence in the learning process.



(1 review)

Read more about The Ideologies of Lived Space in Literary Texts, Ancient and Modern

The Ideologies of Lived Space in Literary Texts, Ancient and Modern

Jo Heirman, University of Amsterdam
Jacqueline Klooster, University of Amsterdam

In a brief essay called Des espaces autres (1984) Michel Foucault announced that after the nineteenth century, which was dominated by a historical outlook, the current century might rather be the century of space. His prophecy has been fulfilled: the end of the twentieth century witnessed a ‘spatial turn' in humanities which was perhaps partly due to the globalisation of our modern world. Inspired by the spatial turn in the humanities, this volume presents a number of essays on the ideological role of space in literary texts. The individual articles analyse ancient and modern literary texts from the angle of the most recent theoretical conceptualisations of space. The focus throughout is on how the experience of space is determined by dominant political, philosophical or religious ideologies and how, in turn, the description of spaces in literature is employed to express, broadcast or deconstruct this experience. By bringing together ancient and modern, mostly postcolonial texts, this volume hopes to stimulate discussion among disciplines and across continents. Among the authors discussed are: Homer, Nonnus, Alcaeus of Lesbos, Apollonius of Rhodes, Vergil, Herodotus, Panagiotis Soutsos, Assia Djebar, Tahar Djaout, Olive Senior, Jamaica Kincaid, Stefan Heym, Benoit Dutuertre, Henrik Stangerup and David Malouf.



(1 review)

Read more about Introduction to Human Osteology

Introduction to Human Osteology

Roberta Hall, Oregon State University
Kenneth Beals, Oregon State University
Holm Neumann
Georg Neumann, Indiana University
Gwyn Madden, Grand Valley State University

This text was designed for use in the human osteology laboratory classroom. Bones are described to aid in identification of skeletonized remains in either an archaeological or forensic anthropology setting. Basic techniques for siding, aging, sexing, and stature estimation are described. Both images of bone and drawings are included which may be used for study purposes outside of the classroom. The text represents work that has been developed over more than 30 years by its various authors and is meant to present students with the basic analytical tools for the study of human osteology.



(7 reviews)