Friday, August 23, 2019

Open Access Journal: Rónai. Revista de estudos clássicos e tradutórios

Rónai. Revista de estudos clássicos e tradutórios
ISSN: 2318-3446
Rónai – Revista de Estudos Clássicos e Tradutórios é uma publicação eletrônica semestral pertencente à Faculdade de Letras (FALE) da Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF).  O seu objetivo é divulgar trabalhos oriundos de instituições de ensino nacionais e internacionais que abordem questões pertinentes aos estudos clássicos e tradutórios.
A Rónai aceita artigos científicos, traduções técnicas e literárias, resenhas críticas e entrevistas – em português, inglês, francês, espanhol e italiano – produzidas por discentes de graduação e pós-graduação (também sob orientação) e por docentes de instituições de ensino nacionais e estrangeiras.

Apresentação

Expediente

Apresentação





In Libris Libertas: Open Access Monographs in Classics, Ancient History, Art History, and Archaeology

In Libris Libertas: Open Access Monographs in Classics, Ancient History, Art History, and Archaeology
Sarah Bond

It is syllabus time for many once again. If you are like me, you want to save your students from spending too much on textbooks, but still want to have a rich array of current reading for students assigned on your syllabus. A few years ago, I put together a popular list of “Open Access Books for Teaching Greek and Roman Inscriptions.” I wanted to piggyback on that by offering just a few options for open access monographs that teachers can assign for course readings or simply to enjoy on your own––for free. A much more comprehensive list of all open access monograph sites can be found on Chuck Jones’ AWOL: The Ancient World Online blog, where you can also find a spectacular list of open access ancient language textbooks for teaching Latin, Greek, Hebrew, Classical Armenian, and many more ancient languages...

Thursday, August 22, 2019

(Partially) Open Access Monograph Series: Kelsey Museum Publications Series

Kelsey Museum Publications Series
The Kelsey Museum has produced a number of books and pamphlets about its collections, exhibitions, archaeological fieldwork, and conferences. Most are available for purchase by mail order from our distributor ISD. Many titles are also available as a free PDF download.
2019 Graffiti as Devotion along the Nile and Beyond
Edited by Geoff Emberling and Suzanne Davis, with contributions by Rebecca Benefiel, Ayman Damarany, Fawzi Hassan Bakhiet, Jeremy Pope, Alexandros Tsakos, Bruce Beyer Williams, and Bogdan Zurawski
Preorder
Download
2017 Cosmogonic Tattoos
By Jim Cogswell, with contributions by Gunalan Nadarajan, Terry Wilfong, Kathryn Huss, MaryAnn Wilkinson, Claire Zimmerman, Karl Daubman, Daniel Herwitz, and Raymond Silverman
Purchase
2017 The Countryside of Aphrodisias
By Christopher Ratté and Angela Commito
Purchase
2016

Leisure and Luxury in the Age of Nero: The Villas of Oplontis near Pompeii
Edited by Elaine K. Gazda and John R. Clarke, with the assistance of Lynley J. McAlpine
Purchase

2015

Passionate Curiosities: Tales of Collectors & Collections from the Kelsey Museum
By Lauren E. Talalay and Margaret Cool Root
Purchase
Download
2015

Rocks, Paper, Memory: Wendy Artin's Watercolor Paintings of Ancient Sculptures
By Christopher Ratté with Wendy Artin. Contributions by Katherine A. Larson
Purchase

2015

Death Dogs: The Jackal Gods of Ancient Egypt
By T. G. Wilfong
Purchase

2014

Pearls of Wisdom: The Arts of Islam at the University of Michigan
By Christiane Gruber and Ashley Dimmig
Purchase

2014

Karanis Revealed: Discovering the Past and Present of a Michigan Excavation in Egypt
By T. G. Wilfong
Purchase
Download
2013

Life, Death, and Afterlife in Ancient Egypt: The Coffin of Djehutymose in the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology
By T. G. Wilfong
Purchase
Download
2012

Hours of Infinity: Recording the Imperfect Eternal
By John Kannenberg, foreword by Marc Weidenbaum, introduction by T. G. Wilfong
Purchase
Download
2011

Archaeology and the Cities of Asia Minor in Late Antiquity
Edited by Ortwin Dally and Christopher Ratté
Purchase

2011

Building a New Rome: The Imperial Colony of Pisidian Antioch (25 BC-AD 700)
Edited by Elaine K. Gazda and Diana Y. Ng, in collaboration with Ünal Demirer
Purchase

2006

In the Field: The Archaeological Expeditions of the Kelsey Museum
By Lauren E. Talalay and Susan E. Alcock
Purchase
Download
2005

Prehistorians Round the Pond: Reflections on Aegean Prehistory as a Discipline
Edited by J. F. Cherry, D. Margomenou, and L.E. Talalay
Purchase

2005

This Fertile Land: Signs and Symbols in the Early Arts of Iran and Iraq
Edited by Margaret Cool Root
Purchase

2004

Karanis, An Egyptian Town in Roman Times: Discoveries of the University of Michigan Expedition to Egypt (1924-1935)
Edited by E.K. Gazda, with a new Preface and updated Bibliography by T.G. Wilfong
Purchase
Download
2001

Textiles from Karanis, Egypt in the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology: Artifacts of Everyday Life
By Thelma K. Thomas
Purchase

2000

The Villa of the Mysteries in Pompeii: Ancient Ritual, Modern Muse
Edited by Elaine Gazda


1997


Leroy Waterman and the University of Michigan Excavations at Sepphoris, 1931: The Scientific Test of the Spade
By Elaine K. Gazda and Elise A. Friedland
Purchase


1997


Women and Gender in Ancient Egypt: From Prehistory to Late Antiquity
By Terry G. Wilfong

Purchase


1996

Images of Empire: Flavian Fragments in Rome and Ann Arbor Rejoined
By Elaine K. Gazda and Anne E. Haeckl
Purchase

1995

Preserving Eternity: Modern Goals, Ancient Intentions. Egyptian Funerary Artifacts in the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology
By Janet E. Richards and Terry G. Wilfong
Purchase
Download

1990

Dangerous Archaeology: Francis Willey Kelsey and Armenia (1919-1920)
By Thelma K. Thomas
Purchase

1990

The President's Choice: A History of the Ruthven Collection, the Collector, and the Donor (1931-1971)
By Marti Lu Allen
Download

1984

The Art of Seals: Aesthetic and Social Dynamics of the Impressed Image from Antiquity to the Present
By Margaret Cool Root
Download

1983

In Pursuit of Antiquity: Thomas Spencer Jerome and the Bay of Naples (1899-1914)
Edited by Elaine K. Gazda
Purchase

1982

Wondrous Glass: Reflections on the World of Rome c.50 B.C. - A.D. 650
By Margaret Cool Root
Purchase

1982

A Scientist Views the Past: The Samuel A. Goudsmit Collection of Egyptian Antiquities
By Margaret Cool Root
Download

1980

A Victorian View of Ancient Rome: The Parker Collection of Historical Photographs in the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology
By Judith Keller and Kenneth A. Breisch
Purchase

1979


Faces of Immortality: Egyptian Mummy Masks, Painted Portraits, and Canopic Jars in the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology
By Margaret Cool Root
Download


1978

Guardians of the Nile: Sculptures from Karanis in the Fayoum (c. 250 BC - AD 450)
By Elaine K. Gazda with Carolyn Hessenbruch, Marti Lu Allen and Valerie Hutchinson
Download

1976

Greek Vases from Boston c. 600-300 B.C.
By Mary B. Comstock and Cornelius C. Vermeule
Download

1933

Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum: United States of America, Fascicle 3. University of Michigan, Fascicle 1
By Wilhelmina van Ingen
Purchase

1926

Excavations at Carthage 1925: A Preliminary Report
by Francis W. Kelsey
Purchase

See AWOL's Alphabetical List of Open Access Monograph Series in Ancient Studies

Coming Soon: MOOC "Discovering Greek & Roman Cities"

MOOC "Discovering Greek & Roman Cities"
https://ou.edia.nl/asset-v1:AncientCities_project+DGRC+DGRC_2019+type@asset+block@titre_v2_378x225.png
Starting September 12th 2019

About this course

In this trilingual MOOC (English, French, German), an international team of experts from six different universities will explore the many facets of Greek and Roman cities. They will discuss mega cities like Rome, centres of international commerce like the Greek city of Delos and Palmyra in the Syrian Desert, regional centres of production like Pompeii, and frontier towns like Dura Europos on the Euphrates.
The world of ancient Greece and Rome was a world of cities. City-states dominated Greece in the first millennium BCE, and in the Roman Empire, urban societies thrived from Britain and Spain in the West to Syria and Jordan in the East. Most of the major developments in the political, social, intellectual, and religious history of this period started in cities. Accordingly, cities are the ideal point of departure for the study of life in antiquity.
The legacy of ancient Greek and Roman cities are still keenly felt, in how we physically organize, build and live in our cities today, as well as in how we think about and define cities. The course will explore the connections between ancient cities and their impact on urban life in later periods across the globe.

Learning goals

Drawing on the very latest research, you will explore the most important aspects of ancient urbanism and urbanity. You will obtain knowledge of the layout and the history of Greek and Roman cities and you will learn about the life of their inhabitants, from emperors to the common people. You will develop a basic understanding of the approaches and methods of urban archaeology and you will experience the diversity and the relevance of ancient heritage for Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Near East. Furthermore, you will learn how ancient cities form the foundation of not only how our cities look today, but also how they function.

Requirements

Participation in the course does not require previous knowledge. It is open to anybody with an interest in archaeology, architecture, history or cultural heritage. Participation is free of charge. If you want to obtain a certificate of completion, you will have to watch all video lectures and complete the quizzes with a success rate of at least 80%.

Course evaluation

We will be evaluating the MOOC by looking at number of enrolments and number of certificates issued, and the views of the video. In addition, we invite you to fill out two questionnaires to assist us in getting some ideas on expectations and experiences of our MOOC participants. Details about these questionnaires are provided in the Welcome section of the MOOC.

Course Staff

Prof. Dr. Stefan Feuser, Kiel University

Prof. Dr. Stefan Feuser, Kiel University

Stefan is an archaeologist whose research resolves around Greece and Turkey in Hellenistic and Roman times. He did research on the urbanism of harbour cities, sculpture, religious sanctuaries and thermal baths. Since 2008 he is member of the excavation team in Pergamon (Turkey) where he is currently excavating a thermal bath complex outside the city. For more info, see the university website
Ass. Prof. Michael Blömer, Centre for Urban Network Evolutions, Aarhus University

Ass. Prof. Michael Blömer, Centre for Urban Network Evolutions, Aarhus University

Michael is an archaeologist whose research revolves around Turkey and the Middle East in the Hellenistic and Roman Period. He has worked on urbanism, sculpture, religious iconography, and the religious life. Michael is also an experienced field archaeologist and co-director of the excavations at Doliche, an ancient city in South-East Turkey. For more info, see this website
Prof. Dr. Alain Duplouy, University of Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne

Prof. Dr. Alain Duplouy, University of Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne

Alain is both an historian and an archaeologist of ancient Greece, and specialized in the study of the archaic society. He has worked extensively on the definition of elite and citizens in Greece, but he is also a specialist of ancient Greek sculpture. He has excavated both in Greece and in Italy. He is now co-director of the French-German excavation at Monte Torretta di Pietragalla (Basilicata, Italy).He is the author of Le Prestige des élites (Les Belles Lettres, 2006) and has edited with Roger Brock the collective volume Defining citizenship in archaic Greece (Oxford University Press, 2018). His new book (Construire la cité, Les Belles Lettres, 2019) offers a sociology of the various communities of archaic Greece. For more info, see the university website
Prof. Dr. Simon Malmberg, Bergen University

Prof. Dr. Simon Malmberg, Bergen University

Simon has studied the development of the city of Rome during the first six centuries AD. He has mainly focused on movement in the city and what effects it had on urban development. His research ranges from processions, palaces and the monumental, to land and river traffic, urban peripheries and local neighbourhood life. Simon has taught courses in the city for many years, and has been employed at the Swedish and Norwegian Institutes in Rome. He co-edited the book The Moving City (2015) on movement in ancient Rome. For more information, see the university website and his website
Stephanie Merten, M.A., Kiel University

Stephanie Merten, M.A., Kiel University

Stephanie is PhD candidate at the University of Kiel and research assistant in the project “Ancient Cities”. Her research focuses on urban architectures and their social implications, especially in Mediterranean cities like Pompeii. She is interested in practices and actions of different social groups – from the elite to subalterns – in ancient cities which is why she combines modern sociological theories with archaeological features. Stephanie also worked and still works as editorial staff in different projects so she is familiar with the representation of archaeological research for the public. For more info, see the university website
Prof. Dr. Rubina Raja, Centre for Network Evolutions, Aarhus University

Prof. Dr. Rubina Raja, Centre for Network Evolutions, Aarhus University

Rubina Raja is professor of Classical Archaeology at Aarhus University, Denmark. She studied in Copenhagen, Rome and Oxford. Since February 2015, she has also been centre director of the Danish National Research Foundation's Centre of Excellence for Urban Network Evolutions (UrbNet). Rubina Raja’s research focuses on urban development, visual representations and religious identities in the eastern Roman provinces and the Levant. She initiated and heads the Palmyra Portrait Project, which has collected the largest corpus of Roman funerary portraits outside Rome, found in Palmyra, Syria. Rubina Raja directs an extensive excavation project in Jerash, Jordan, together with Achim Lichtenberger, Münster University, focusing on the so far unexplored Northwest Quarter of the ancient city of Gerasa and she also co-directs the new Italian-Danish excavations on Caesar’s Forum in Rome together with Jan Kindberg Jacobsen.
Christina Videbech, Bergen University

Christina Videbech, Bergen University

Christina is a PhD candidate at the University of Bergen and employed as a research assistant in the Ancient Cities Project. She has previously worked extensively with dissemination of classical archaeology to the general public, teaching both children and adults. She has been employed at the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek in Copenhagen (2008-2016), The National Museum of Denmark (2009-2012), and The National Museum of Art in Copenhagen (2008-2012), where she has worked with both the dissemination of the collections, the production of teaching materials, and the construction of exhibitions. Furthermore, she has teached at the People’s University in Copenhagen. As a scholar she has worked especially with the city of Rome in late antiquity, publishing articles on the reuse of building materials and the transition of Rome from antiquity to the middle ages. For more info, see her website and the university website
Prof. Dr. Alessia Zambon, Université de Versailles-Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines

Prof. Dr. Alessia Zambon, Université de Versailles-Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines

While trained as a classical archaeologist, Alessia can rather be defined as a historian of archaeology, as she investigates the conditions of the rise of archaeology as a science during the 19th century. As such, she has published extensively on Western travelers in the Ottoman empire and in Modern Greece, including her book Aux origines de l'archéologie en Grèce : Fauvel et sa méthode (Paris, 2014) ; she is now editing the collective volume From Plunder to Patrimonial awareness in Greece and in the Ottoman Empire: The French and other Westerner’s role. Personal webpage
Prof. Dr. Mantha Zarmakoupi, University of Pennsylvania

Prof. Dr. Mantha Zarmakoupi, University of Pennsylvania

Mantha Zarmakoupi is the Morris Russell and Josephine Chidsey Williams Assistant Professor in Roman architecture and urbanism in the Department of History of Art at the University of Pennsylvania. Her work addresses the broader social, economic and cultural conditions underpinning the production of ancient art, architecture and urbanism. She has published widely on Roman luxury villas, including the monograph, Designing for Luxury on the Bay of Naples (c. 100 BCE – 79 CE) (Oxford UP 2014) and edited volume The Villa of the Papyri at Herculaneum (De Gruyter 2010), as well as on the architecture, harbour infrastructure, and urban development of late Hellenistic and Roman Delos. She currently co-directs the underwater survey around Delos and Rheneia (2014-) and the underwater survey around islands Levitha, Kinaros and Maura in the central Aegean Sea (2019-). She also co-leads with Simon Richards the Delos Network in order to investigate the history and legacy of the Delos symposia (1963-75), which were organized by architect and planner C. A. Doxiadis, in the context of 1960s and 1970s discussions about the future of urban planning. For more info see the university website and her personal website.

Survey of Roman Archaeology teaching and curricula

Survey of Roman Archaeology teaching and curricula
This is a survey about your experiences of Roman Archaeology teaching and curricula. It should take c. 10-15 mins. The answers you provide will be used as data for Dr Zena Kamash’s keynote lecture at the Theoretical Roman Archaeology Conference 2019 (Kent, UK) and will also inform an accompanying workshop at that conference on ‘Diversifying Roman Archaeology Curricula’ run by Dr Zena Kamash and Dr Lisa Lodwick. Findings will be used to provide a more in-depth understanding of how we teach Roman Archaeology, what we teach and the ways in which we might diversify our teaching positively in the future. These data may also be used in publications relating to this topic. 
The survey will close on Wednesday 28th August.
You have the option to retain anonymity. You can skip any question or any part of a question.

Consent:
I have been fully informed about the aims and purposes of the survey. I understand that:
• there is no compulsion for me to participate in this survey and, if I do choose to participate, I may withdraw at any stage;
• any information which I give will be used solely for the purposes of this research, which may include publications, academic conferences or seminar presentations;
• if applicable, the information which I give may be shared between any of the other researcher(s) participating in this project in an anonymised form;
• all information I give will be treated as confidential;
• the researcher(s) will make every effort to preserve my anonymity unless I give written permission to relinquish anonymity.

Data Protection Notice - The information you provide will be used for research purposes and your personal data will be processed in accordance with current data protection legislation and the University's notification lodged at the Information Commissioner's Office. Your personal data will be treated in the strictest confidence and will not be disclosed to any unauthorised third parties. Data from this survey will be stored for a maximum of five years. The results of the research will be published in anonymised form.

Contact Details:
For further information about the research, please contact:
Name: Dr Zena Kamash, Senior Lecturer in Roman Archaeology, Dept of Classics, Royal Holloway, University of London
Email: Zena.Kamash@rhul.ac.uk
This project has received ethics approval from Royal Holloway University of London.

Open Access Journal: Journal of Ancient Philosophy

[First posted in AWOL 25 May 2010. Most recently update 22 August 2019]

Journal of Ancient Philosophy
ISSN: 1981-9471
The Journal of Ancient Philosophy publishes articles, reviews and textual notes on ancient Greek and Roman philosophy, as well as translations of classical texts into Portuguese or Spanish. It also provides information about Latin-American symposia, meetings and conferences on ancient Greek and Roman philosophy. It is published twice a year, in May and October. The purposes for which the Journal of Ancient Philosophywas created are to foster classical studies in Latin-America, providing scholars a vehicle for the publication of researches and discussions, and to promote international dialogue across different languages and approaches. It is open to all scholars world-wide to submit contributions for inclusion in this Journal. The accepted languages are: Portuguese, Spanish, English, French, German and Italian. Every contribution is read by referees.



















2007



See AWOL's full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies

Spanish/Catalan/Portuguese Open Access Journals on the Ancient World

Open Access Journal: Polymnia

[First posted in AWOL 20 February 2017, updated 22 August 2019]

Polymnia
ISSN: 2491-1704
Revue Polymnia
The international network Polymnia, created in 1999 by Jacqueline Fabre-Serris and Françoise Graziani to promote the study of the mythographical tradition in Europe from Antiquity to the 17th Century has developed two types of activities: a programme of conferences in the various partner institutions and the publications of bilingual texts with translations and notes in the series Mythographes (Presses Universitaires du Septentrion).

The journal Polymnia continues the research programme of the network. It offers a space for interdisciplinary and diachronic reflection and debate about mythographical texts in Antiquity, in the Middles Ages, and in the Renaissance.

Le réseau de recherche international Polymnia, créé en 1999 par Jacqueline Fabre-Serris et Françoise Graziani pour promouvoir l’étude de la tradition mythographique de l’Antiquité au 17° siècle, a développé deux sortes d’activités: des colloques entre les universités partenaires et une collection de textes bilingues, la collection « Mythographes », publiée aux Presses Universitaires du Septentrion.

La revue électronique Polymnia poursuit le programme de recherche du réseau. Elle propose un espace de réflexion et de débat, interdisciplinaire et diachronique, spécifiquement consacré aux textes mythographiques de l’Antiquité à la Renaissance.
Alexandra Trachsel
Démétrios de Scepsis et son Τρωϊκὸς διάκοσμος, ou comment ordonner le passé mythologique de la Troade au IIe siècle av. J.-C. [Abstract][Full text]
Jacqueline Fabre-Serris
Un exemple de sélection, ordre et traitement mythographique chez Hygin : les fables 1-27 [Abstract][Full text]
Charles Delattre
L’alphabet au secours de la géographie. (Dés)organiser le De fluviis du pseudo-Plutarque [Abstract][Full text]
R. Scott Smith
Myth and Mythography in Pliny’s Geography, Naturalis Historia 3–6 
[Abstract][Full text]
Gisèle Besson
Écrire après Fulgence : ordre et désordre des mythes chez quelques lecteurs des Mitologiarum Libri 
[Abstract][Full text]
Jean-Yves Tilliette
Coluccio Salutati à la croisée des chemins. Structure, sources, méthodes et intentions du De laboribus Herculis [Abstract][Full text]
Minerva Alganza Roldán, Julian Barr, Greta Hawes
The reception history of Palaephatus 1 (On the Centaurs) in Ancient and Byzantine texts [Abstract][Full text]

See AWOL's full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies