Saturday, April 30, 2016

Aquae Urbis Romae: The Waters of the City of Rome

Aquae Urbis Romae: The Waters of the City of Rome
http://www3.iath.virginia.edu/waters/m4.jpg
Katherine Wentworth Rinne (resume)
P r o j e c t   d e s c r i p t i o n
Aquae Urbis Romae: the Waters of the City of Rome is a cartographic history of nearly 2800 years of water infrastructure and urban development in Rome. Water is a living system that includes natural features (springs, the Tiber River, etc.) and hydraulic elements (aqueducts, bridges, fountains, etc.) that are linked through topography. Learn about the structure, methodology, and pedagogical goals of the project. First time users start here.

G.I.S. Timeline Map
Follow the urban development of Rome through a unique G.I.S. timeline map that chronicles changes to the water infrastructure system from 753 BC through the sixteenth century. See how sewers, aqueducts, fountains and other hydraulic elements changed the face of Rome, as important people like Agrippa, Emperor Nero and popes Sixtus V and Clement VIII, among others, used water as an element of political control.

S e a r c h
Search the archive for specific hydrological features (including springs or streams), infrastructure features (including aqueducts, bridges, and sewers), urban features (water mills and fountains for example), patrons (such as Agrippa, Nicolas V, or Sixtus V), and designers (such as Giacomo Della Porta, Gian Lorenzo Bernini), etc.

J o u r n a l
Historic maps, treatises and images are available here, including a high-resolution "Zoomify" copy of the 1551 Bufalini Plan of Rome. More maps are on the way.

We publish refereed articles contributed by scholars and graduate students in our new occasional on-line journal "The Waters of Rome". If you are interested in contributing, please contact us.

T i m e l i n e

T y p o l o g y

T o p o g r a p h y

ICONEM's digitalized 3D model of the Temple of Bel, Palmyra, post destruction

ICONEM's digitalized 3D model of the Temple of Bel, Palmyra, post destruction
https://d35krx4ujqgbcr.cloudfront.net/avatars/77e89a8925aa4f069f762e441687c23e/f00fdd48135a4ab89b4efdd7ba61e569.jpeg
In partnership with the DGAM, the ICONEM’s team was the first one to be in Palmyra since Daesh’s departure. New phase of the major project « Syrian Heritage », this mission has been an opportunity to give a clear picture of the damages suffered by the « pearl of the desert », and more specifically by the Temple of Bel as it has been left behind by Daesh fighters, using photogrammetry. 

The digitalized 3D model allows us to observe the existence of stone blocs remaining almost intact, meaning that there might be some hope for a partial reconstruction. Some other blocs however have been dynamited. 

ICONEM’s support in Palmyra has been found essential in order to document the appearance and state of the site right after it’s liberation, which is going to be helpful to the scientific community. Dedicated in 32 AD and consecrated to the protective divinity of Palmyra, the Mesopotamian god Bel, the Temple of Bel was before its destruction one of the best preserved antique temples of Syria.

Friday, April 29, 2016

ASOR Archives Finding Aids Online

 [First posted in AWOL 13 July 2010. Updated 29 April 2016]

The ASOR Archives
The ASOR archives houses materials documenting a century's worth of ASOR's contributions to archaeology. The archive contains the papers of past ASOR presidents, records created by administrative bodies such as the Board of Trustees, the Executive Committee, and the Committee on Archaeological Policy, full runs of ASOR publications, and materials pertaining to excavations lead or participated in by ASOR.

Collections By Subject

Administrative Records Board of Trustees Records Excavation Records Dhahr Mirzbaneh Excavation Records Diban Excavation Records Khirbet et Tannur Excavation Records ASOR Excavation Records Issawiya Tomb Excavation Records Jerash Excavation Records Nippur Excavation Photograph Collection Shechem Excavation Records Tell el-Kheleifeh Excavation Records
Photograph Collections American Palestine Exploration Society (A.P.E.S.) Photograph Collection Glass Plate Negatives Collection Nelson Glueck Photograph Collection
Nippur Excavation Photograph Collection

Presidential Records A. Henry Detweiler Papers Carl Kraeling Papers G. Ernest Wright Papers William Foxwell Albright Papers

Professional & Personal Papers Carl Kraeling Papers Clarence Fisher Papers Edmund Irwin Gordon Papers G. Ernest Wright Papers Nelson Glueck Papers Publications Biblical Archaeologist / Near Eastern Archaeology Collection ASOR Newsletter Collection Bulletin of ASOR Collection Journal of Cuneiform Studies Collection
Schools & Committees Agency for International Development Collection American School of Oriental Research in Jerusalem (AIA Committee) Records ASOR Jerusalem School Records Ancient Manuscripts Committee Records Committee on Archaeological Policy
General Collections Subject File
Coll. 001. American Schools of Oriental Research Newsletter Collection
This collection contains a full run of the ASOR Newsletters from 1939-1995. The newsletters contain information about ASOR projects, events such as annual meetings and conferences, fundraising efforts, grant awards, and administrative announcements. Back issues from 1996 to the present are available online.



Coll. 002. William Foxwell Albright Papers
This collection contains the materials generated by William F. Albright during his ASOR presidency. The collection spans from 1936-1964, and includes materials from Albright's ASOR presidency. It includes a significant amount of correspondence with other archaeologists and ASOR colleagues regarding research, excavations, new archaeological methods, and logistical aspects of publishing ASOR bulletins, journals, scholarly papers and monographs. Learn more about the collection from the Collection Summary. Learn what is in the collection from the Folder List.



Coll. 003. Ancient Manuscripts Committee Records
The Ancient Manuscripts Committee was originally founded as the Dead Sea Scrolls Committee. The majority of the collection is correspondence regarding the study, publication rights, and preservation of the Dead Sea Scrolls, and the funding of the Committee. The records date from 1963 to 1981. Learn more about the collection from the Collection Summary. Learn what is in the collection and browse materials online using the Folder List.


Coll. 004. American Palestine Exploration Society Photograph Collection
The Tancrede Dumas Photograph Collection contains photographs of archaeological sites in Palestine and Lebanon. The photographs were taken during the 1875 expedition of the American Palestine Exploration Society. Learn more about the collection from the Collection Summary. Learn what is in the collection and browse materials online using the Folder List. (Please allow a few moments for the Folder List to load.)



Coll. 006. Board of Trustees Records
The Board of Trustees Collection contains board meeting minutes from 1921-1989. Learn more about the collection from the Collection Summary. Learn what is in the collection from the Folder List.



Coll. 007. Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research Collection
The BASOR Collection contains early volumes of the Bulletin, as well as original photographs, article submissions, and other materials published in the Bulletin. The materials date from 1919-1974. Learn more about the collection from the Collection Summary. Learn what is in the collection from the Folder List.


Coll. 008. Committee on Archaeological Policy Records
The CAP Records document the committee's activities, such as providing funding and support to affiliated researchers. This collection has not yet been processed.


Coll. 009. American School of Oriental Research in Jerusalem Records, held at the Archaeological Institute of America
ASOR began as a subcommittee of the AIA, and ASOR's earliest records are held there. The materials date from 1900 to the early 1920s. This collection is being processed.


Coll. 010. Nelson Glueck Papers
The Nelson Glueck Papers contain the professional correspondence, diaries, and photographs of this eminent biblical archaeologist. Materials in the collection date from the early 1930s to 2008. Learn more about the collection from the Collection Summary. Learn what is in the collection and browse materials online using the Folder List. (Please allow a few moments for the Folder List to load.)


Coll. 011. A. Henry Detweiler Papers
The A. Henry Detweiler Papers document Detweiler's years as ASOR president. Learn more about the collection from the Collection Summary. Learn what is in the collection and browse materials online using the Folder List. (Please allow a few moments for the Folder List to load.)


Coll. 012. Carl Kraeling Papers
The Kraeling Papers document Kraeling's years as ASOR president. The collection primarily contains correspondence with ASOR colleagues and archaeologists. Kraeling supported the continued study of the Dead Sea Scrolls, and encouraged humanitarian awareness for Near Eastern refugees during a turbulent period in the area’s history. The records span from 1947 to 1955. Learn more about the collection from the Collection Summary. Learn what is in the collection and browse materials online using the Folder List. (Please allow a few moments for the Folder List to load.)


Coll. 013. Tell el-Kheleifeh Excavation Records
The Tell el-Kheleifeh Excavation Records document the ASOR excavation directed by Nelson Glueck from 1938 to 1940. The records include level books, artifact registries, excavation diaries, and photographs. Learn more about the collection from the Collection Summary. Learn what is in the collection and browse materials online using the Folder List.


Coll. 014. Khirbet et-Tannur Excavation Records
The Khirbet et-Tannur Excavation Records document the 1938 excavation of a Nabataean temple. The excavation was directed by Nelson Glueck. The collection includes level books, excavation diaries, artifacts, and photographs. Learn more about the collection from the Collection Summary. Learn what is in the collection and browse materials online using the Folder List.


Coll. 015. Edmund Irwin Gordon Papers
This collection documents the life and career of Edmund Gordon. Gordon was a scholar of Near Eastern languages. He served in WWII as a signal intelligence specialist, and later studied at the ASOR Jerusalem School. The collection spans 1934-1984. Learn more about the collection from the Collection Summary. Learn what is in the collection from the Folder List. (Please allow a few moments for the Folder List to load.)


Coll. 016 ASOR Jerusalem School Collection
This collection contains financial documents, ledgers, correspondence, as well as legal materials. All pertain to the administration of the school. The collection also contains artifact drawings and photographs of the many excavations affiliated with ASOR. Learn more about the collection from the Collection Summary. Learn what is in the collection from the Folder List.


Coll. 017 Shechem Excavation Records
This collection contains administrative and financial records, correspondence, site reports, field notes, artifact registries, top plans, pottery drawings, and photographs of the site and artifacts found there. Additionally, the collection includes a manuscript of Shechem: The Biography of a Biblical City by G. Ernest Wright, as well as an operetta about the excavation that was written and performed by participants in the 1962 excavation season. Learn more about the collection from the Collection Summary. Learn what is in the collection and browse materials online using the Folder List.



Coll. 018. G. Ernest Wright Papers
The G. Ernest Wright Papers span from 1957-1972. The collection primarily contains correspondence documenting ASOR administration, the founding of the journal Biblical Archaeologist, Wright's participation in the Shechem excavation, and his service as visiting archaeological director of Hebrew Union College. Wright was elected ASOR president in 1965, and worked with the organization until his death in 1974. Learn more about the collection from the Collection Summary. Learn what is in the collection from the Folder List. (Please allow a few moments for the Folder List to load.)


Coll. 019. Diban Excavation Records
This collection documents the excavation of Diban in Jordan by Frederick V. Winnett from 1950-1965. The collection contains photographs, correspondence, and artifacts registries. Learn more about the collection from the Collection Summary. Learn what is in the collection from the Folder List.


Coll. 020. Clarence Fisher Papers
This collection primarily documents Fisher's academic and professional life. The collection contains his exhaustive pottery corpus, writings, architectural and artifact sketches, correspondence, creative writing, and excavation diaries. The bulk of the materials pertain to the analysis of Near Eastern pottery. The materials date from 1859-1957.


Coll. 021. Issawiya Tomb Excavation Records
This collection documents the excavation of a Herodian tomb discovered underneath a field on the hillock of Ras el Jami in Issawiya, a neighborhood of Jerusalem just north of Mount Scopus. The collection contains photographs and journals, and a diary kept by Carl Graesser. The collection spans 1970-1995. Learn more about the collection from the Collection Summary. Learn what is in the collection and browse materials online using the Folder List.


Coll. 022 Jerash Excavation Records
The collection contains primarily photographs and correspondence documenting different areas of the excavation. Two sketchbooks include detailed architectural drawings and some journal entries. The General file has an excavation report. With this collection is a wood printing plate of the site map. The materials date from 1928 to 1952. Learn more about the collection from the Collection Summary. Learn what is in the collection and browse materials online using the Folder List.


Coll. 023 Biblical Archaeologist / Near Eastern Archaeology Collection
This collection contains Biblical Archaeologist and Near Eastern Archaeology, magazines published by ASOR. The magazines contain scholarly articles, field notes, book reviews, and photographs all pertaining to the art, archaeology and history of the cultures of the ancient Near East. Learn more about the collection from the Collection Summary. Learn what is in the collection from the Folder List.


Coll. 024 Journal of Cuneiform Studies Collection
This collection contains published journals between 1951 and 2009 with some gaps. Learn more about the collection from the Collection Summary. Learn what is in the collection from the Folder List.


Coll. 025 Dhahr Mirzbaneh Excavation Records
This collection contains the original manuscript of Paul Lapp’s book, The Dhahr Mirzbaneh Tombs: Three Immediate Bronze Age Cemeteries in Jordan (1966), along with the figures and plates used in its creation. The collection also includes notes and drawings by architect David Voelter. Learn more about the collection from the Collection Summary. Learn what is in the collection from the Folder List.


Coll. 026 Nippur Excavation Photograph Collection
This collection includes over 300 cyanotype photographs depicting artifacts, architecture, and scenes of excavation work from the Nippur Excavations of the University of Pennsylvania covering 1888-1900. In addition to their archaeological interest, the images are notable for their portrayal of the lives of the Arab laborers who worked on the excavation. Learn more about the collection from the Collection Summary. Learn what is in the collection from the Folder List.



Coll. 027 The Nelson Glueck Photograph Collection
This collection contains a photograph index compiled for Glueck's research. The photographs documents hundreds of sites. Many, but not all of the photographs were taken by Glueck. Learn more about the collection from the Collection Summary. Learn what is in the collection and browse materials online using the Folder List. (Please allow a few moments for the Folder List to load.)



Coll. 028 Subject File
This collection contains miscellaneous materials organized alphabetically by subject. Learn what is in the collection and browse materials online using the Folder List. (Please allow a few moments for the Folder List to load.)



Coll. 029 ASOR Excavation Records
This collection is comprised of grant applications, correspondence, financial records, newsletters, budgets, publications, reports, account books, and photographs from a number of ASOR affiliated excavations. Learn more about the collection from the Collection Summary. Learn what is in the collection from the Folder List.


Coll. 030 ASOR Glass Plate Negative Collection
This collection contains glass plate negative photographs from Beth El, Beth Zur, Tel Beit Mirsim, and Tel el Ful. The photos were taken between 1932 - 1935. Learn more about the collection from the Collection Summary. Learn what is in the collection from the Folder List.


Coll. 032 Agency for International Development Collection
This collection contains information about ASOR's relationship with the Agency for International Development (AID). The content includes correspondence, financial documents, grant proposals, and reports. Learn more about the collection from the Collection Summary. Learn what is in the collection from the Folder List.



Help crowd source the Egypt Exploration Society (EES) Abydos Tomb cards Cemetery O, P, and Y archives

3 Egyptian Archaeology Projects: Egyptian archaeological crowd-sourcing
This application enables the transcription of archive cards from the Egypt Exploration Society (EES) Abydos Tomb cards Cemetery O, P, and Y archives. Images will be drawn from the EES Flickr feed and redisplayed in the browser window. The EES would like the following information to be transcribed for them to create a searchable archive for their records.
These fields are:
  • Excavator's or finder's name
  • Date of discovery
  • Record number
  • Descriptive data
  • Whether the card maybe a reverse
The object cards have been scanned by EES volunteers.

This project is on behalf of:

This application is on behalf of the Egypt Exploration Society.
EES logo

MicroPasts: Crowd-sourcing

Help us gather high quality research data about our human history

You can assist existing research projects with tasks that need human intelligence, such as the accurate location of artefact findspots or photographed scenes, the identification of subject matter in historic archives, the masking of photos meant for 3D modelling, or the transcription of letters and catalogues. Other tasks might require on-location contributions by members of the public, such as submitting your own photographs of particular archaeological sites or objects. By contributing to a MicroPasts project you will:
  • Have a direct impact on research in archaeology, history and heritage
  • Help with tasks that computers cannot do
  • Develop skills that interest you
  • Produce results that will be open and freely usable
To start contributing, just choose one of our Featured Projects below or visit our full list of ongoing Projects.

 

Thursday, April 28, 2016

Archaeology in Syria Network

[First posted on AWOL  201 June 2014, updated 28 April 2016]

Archaeology in Syria Network

Archaeology in Syria NETWORK is created for disseminating accumulated multidisciplinary knowledge
تم إنشاء شبكة “أركيولوجي إن سيريا” لنشر المعرفة المتراكمة متعددة التخصصات
The main goal for creating “Archaeology in Syria” NETWORK is to connect those who are involved or interested in disseminating accumulated multidisciplinary knowledge through continuous archaeological excavation and research in the Near East in general and Syria in particular.
الهدف الرئيسي لإنشاء شبكة “أركيولوجي إن سيريا” هو الربط بين المشاركين أو المهتمين في نشر المعرفة المتراكمة المتعددة الإختصاصات من خلال أعمال التنقيب والأبحاث الأثرية المستمرة في الشرق الأدنى بشكل عام وسوريا بشكل خاص
Contact us info@ainsyria.net للتواصل مع

Wissen in Bewegung. Institution – Iteration – Transfer (Episteme in Bewegung. Beiträge zur einer transdisziplinären Wissensgeschichte, Bd. 1)

Wissen in Bewegung. Institution – Iteration – Transfer (Episteme in Bewegung. Beiträge zur einer transdisziplinären Wissensgeschichte, Bd. 1)
Buchumschlag
Buchumschlag

Eva Cancik-Kirschbaum, Anita Traninger (Hg.)— 2015

Institutionen geraten normalerweise gerade nicht in den Blick, wenn es um Prozesse des Wissenswandels geht. Vielmehr ist es eine weithin geteilte Überzeugung, dass Wandel wenn, dann stets nur außerhalb dieser Kreativitätsblockierer stattfindet. Nun ist aber gerade dort, wo vermeintlich rigide und stur am Überkommenen festgehalten wird, stets auch Wandel feststellbar. Ganz offensichtlich bringen also Praktiken, die auf Wiederholung gepolt sind und so institutionelle Zusammenhänge stabilisieren sollen, zugleich auch Veränderung hervor. Dieses Zusammenspiel von Wiederholung und Veränderung wird in diesem Sammelband mit dem Begriff der ‚Iteration‘ gefasst. Die Autorinnen und Autoren zeigen anhand einer breiten Palette historischer Fallbeispiele, welche Varianten des Wechselspiels von Wiederholung und Wandel zu beobachten sind und welche Befunde sich daraus für eine transdisziplinäre Wissensgeschichte ergeben. Der Band eröffnet die Reihe „Episteme in Bewegung. Beiträge zu einer transdisziplinären Wissensgeschichte“, in der die Ergebnisse der Zusammenarbeit im Sonderforschungsbereich 980, der an der Freien Universität Berlin angesiedelt ist, präsentiert werden.
TitelWissen in Bewegung. Institution – Iteration – Transfer
VerfasserEva Cancik-Kirschbaum, Anita Traninger (Hg.)
MitwirkendeBeteiligte Disziplinen: Ägyptologie, Assyriologie, Germanistik, Iranistik, Islamwissenschaft, Judaistik, Kirchengeschichte, Klass. Philologie, Koreanistik, Kunstgeschichte, Medizin-, Rechts-, Religionsgeschichte, Romanische Philologie u.v.m.
VerlagHarrassowitz
Datum2015
Quelle/n
Erschienen inEpisteme in Bewegung. Beiträge zur einer transdisziplinären Wissensgeschichte, Bd. 1
ArtText

Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Altertumswissenschaften in a Digital Age: Egyptology, Papyrology and beyond

Altertumswissenschaften in a Digital Age: Egyptology, Papyrology and beyond
Edited by Monica Berti and Franziska Naether

Proceedings of a conference and workshop in Leipzig, November 4-6, 2015
Dokumente und Dateien

Hinweis

Bitte nutzen Sie beim Zitieren immer folgende Url:
http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:bsz:15-qucosa-201500
1. Chapter 1 = Research Area 1: How to Structure and Organize Data?
Workflow
1.1. Felix Schäfer (DAI Berlin, IANUS): Ein länges Leben für Deine Daten!

1.2. Simon Schweitzer (Berlin): The Text Encoding Software of the Thesaurus Linguae Aegyptiae

1.3. Frank Feder (Göttingen): Cataloguing and editing Coptic Biblical texts in an online database system

1.4. Tom Gheldof (Leuven): Trismegistos: identifying and aggregating metadata of Ancient World texts

1.5. Monica Berti, Franziska Naether, Julia Jushaninowa, Giuseppe G.A. Celano,
Polina Yordanova (Leipzig/Sofia/New York): The Digital Rosetta Stone: textual alignment and linguistic annotation

1.6. Camilla Di Biase-Dyson, Stefan Beyer, Nina Wagenknecht (Göttingen/Leipzig):
Annotating figurative language: Another perspective for digital Altertumswissenschaften

1.7. Jochen Tiepmar (Leipzig): Release of the MySQL based implementation of the CTS protocol

1.8. Simon Schweitzer (Berlin), Simone Gerhards (Mainz): Auf dem Weg zu einem TEI-Austauschformat für ägyptisch-koptische Texte

1.9. Nicola Reggiani (Heidelberg/Parma): The Corpus of Greek Medical Papyri and Digital Papyrology: new perspectives from an ongoing project

1.10. Marc Brose, Josephine Hensel, Gunnar Sperveslage, (Leipzig/Berlin): Von Champollion bis Erman – Lexikographiegeschichte im Digitalen Zeitalter, Projekt “Altägyptische Wörterbücher im Verbund”

1.11. Lucia Vannini (London): Virtual reunification of papyrus fragments

1.12. Matthias Schulz (Leipzig): What remains behind – on the virtual reconstruction of dismembered manuscripts

2. Chapter 2 = Research Area 2: Which Fields of Research are
Relevant? Established and Emerging Use Cases

2.1. Anne Herzberg (Berlin): Prosopographia Memphitica. Individuelle Identitäten und Kollektive Biographien einer Residenzstadt des Neuen Reiches

2.2. Felicitas Weber (Swansea): The Ancient Egyptian Demonology Project: Second Millennium BCE

2.3. Holger Essler, Vincenzo Damiani (Würzburg): Anagnosis – automatisierte Buchstabenverknüpfung von Transkript und Papyrusabbildung

2.4. So Miyagawa (Göttingen/Kyoto): An Intuitive Unicode Input Method for Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphic Writing: Applying the Input Technology of the Japanese Writing System

2.5. Mark-Jan Nederhof (St. Andrews): OCR of hand-written transcriptions of hieroglyphic text

2.6. Svenja A. Gülden, Kyra van der Moezel (Mainz): „Altägyptische Kursivschriften“ in a digital age

2.7. Claudia Maderna-Sieben, Fabian Wespi, Jannik Korte (Heidelberg):
Deciphering Demotic Digitally 
2.8. Christopher Waß (München): Demotisch, Hieratisch und SQL: Ein Beispiel für die Anwendung von DH in der Ägyptologie

3. Chapter 3 = Research Area 3: How to Train Next Generations?
Teaching

3.1. Julia Jushaninowa (Leipzig): E-learning Kurs “Verarbeitung digitaler Daten in der Ägyptologie”

4. Chapter 4 = Research Area 4: How to Impact Society? Citizen
Science and Public Engagement


4.1. Usama Gad (Heidelberg/Cairo): The Digital Challenges and Chances: The Case of Papyri and Papyrology in Egypt

4.2. Aris Legowski (Bonn): The Project is completed! What now? The Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead – A Digital Textzeugenarchiv

5. Chapter 5: Additional Papers

5.1. Rita Lucarelli, Images of Eternity in 3D. The visualization of ancient Egyptian coffins through photogrammetry

5.2. Van der Perre, Athena (Brussels): From Execration Texts to Quarry Inscriptions. Combining IR, UV and 3D-Imaging for the Documentation of Hieratic Inscriptions

6. Chapter 6: Workshops

6.1. Protocol of Workshop 1 by Franziska Naether and Felix Schäfer: Disruptive
Technologies: Feature on 3D in Egyptian Archaeology (Chair: Felix Schäfer)
with short presentations

6.2. Hassan Aglan (Luxor): 3D tombs modeling by simple tools

6.3. Rebekka Pabst (Mainz): Neue Bilder, neue Möglichkeiten. Chancen für die Ägyptologie durch das 3D-Design

6.4. Protocol of Workshop 2 by Monica Berti, Franziska Naether and Svenja A.
Gülden: Annotated Corpora: Trends and Challenges (Chair : Svenja A. Gülden)

6.5. Minutes of the Final Discussion with suggestions and decisions for the field by
Monica Berti and Franziska Naether

7. Poster Presentations

7.1. Isabelle Marthot (Universität Basel): Papyri of the University of Basel (together
with Sabine Huebner and Graham Claytor)

7.2. Isabelle Marthot (Universität Basel): University of Minnesota Project: Ancient
Lives, a crowd-sourced Citizen Science project

7.3. Uta Siffert (Universität Wien): Project Meketre: From Object to Icon (together
with Lubica Hudakova, Peter Jánosy and Claus Jurman)

7.4. Charlotte Schubert et al.: “Digital Classics Online” Journal

8. Photos of the Venue by Monica Berti, Julia Jushaninowa and
Franiska Naether



If you want to know more: Links

Check out what people tweeted and posted about and during the conference by
searching after the hashtag “#DHEgypt15” on Twitter (https://twitter.com/) and
Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/).

Institutional Homepages in Leipzig:
Digital Humanities: http://www.dh.uni-leipzig.de/wo/dhegypt15/

Egyptology: http://aegyptologisches-institut.uni-leipzig.de


Julia Jushaninowa’s Blog Report about the conference: http://www.dh.uni-leipzig.de/wo/news-announcements/

ISAW Papers 11 (2016): The moon phase anomaly in the Antikythera Mechanism

The moon phase anomaly in the Antikythera Mechanism
Christián C. Carman and Marcelo Di Cocco
ISAW Papers 11 (2016)

Abstract: The Antikythera Mechanism is a mechanical astronomical instrument that was discovered in an ancient shipwreck at the beginning of the twentieth century, made about the second century B.C. It had several pointers showing the positions of the moon and sun in the zodiac, the approximate date according to a lunisolar calendar, several subsidiary dials showing calendrical phenomena, and also predictions of eclipses. The mechanism also had a display of the Moon’s phases: a small ball, half pale and half dark, rotating with the lunar synodic period and so showing the phases of the moon. The remains of the moon phase display include a fragmentary contrate gear. According to the reconstruction offered by Michael Wright, this gear is now pointing unintentionally in the wrong direction. In this paper we offer for the first time a detailed description of the remains of the moon phase mechanism. Based on this evidence, we argue that the extant contrate gear direction is the originally intended one, and we offer a conjectural explanation for its direction as an essential part of a representation of Aristarchus’s hypothesis that half moon phase is observably displaced from exact quadrature.

Library of Congress Subjects: Antikythera mechanism (Ancient calculator); Astronomy, Greek.
Contents

    Introduction
    Section 1: the moon phase mechanism
    Section 2: the direction of the contrate gear
    Section 3: non-uniform motion of the moon phase ball
    Acknowledgements
    References
    Notes


Monday, April 25, 2016

Reading, Writing, Romans: The blog of the Ashmolean Latin Inscriptions Project (AshLI)

Reading, Writing, Romans: The blog of the Ashmolean Latin Inscriptions Project (AshLI
The Ashmolean Latin Inscriptions Project (AshLI) is a three-way collaboration between Warwick University, Oxford University and the Ashmolean Museum, supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council.
Our Aims
We love Latin inscriptions. Really. And we want other people to love them too. Using the fantastic collection from the Ashmolean Museum, we’ve set ourselves some challenges, all of which we have to meet before September 2016:
  1. To research and catalogue all the Latin inscriptions in the Ashmolean Museum. The last person to do this was Richard Chandler when he wrote Marmora Oxoniensia in 1763. That gives us plenty to do.
  2. To set up new displays of Latin inscriptions in the Ashmolean. These will be on themes like death and burial, the Roman army, slaves and freed-people, literacy in the Roman Empire and the lives of Roman women. For us, inscriptions are about people, not just letter shapes or carving techniques.
  3. To produce teaching resources that can be downloaded from the Ashmolean Education Department for use in Primary and Secondary schools, and to devise new museum visits for students who are interested in the lives of the Romans.
The AshLI Team
  • Professor Alison Cooley, is Principal Investigator for the project and Head of Warwick University’s Department of Classics and Ancient History. Alison is a specialist in Latin inscriptions, and is taking on the challenge of writing the new catalogue.
  • Dr Abigail Baker is an archaeologist and museologist, based at Oxford’s Centre for the Study of Ancient Documents (CSAD). She’s responsible for bringing AshLI’s work to the public through education projects, museum displays and social media. She also works on the EpiDoc based online catalogue – making the Ashmolean’s inscriptions accessible for free online.
Other members of the team are Dr Paul Roberts, the Keeper of Antiquities at the Ashmolean Museum, Dr Charles Crowther from Oxford’s Centre for the Study of Ancient Documents, and Stephanie Lane, who is studying material from the project as part of her PhD on Roman Literacy.
AshLI’s access to the Ashmolean’s inscriptions is masterminded by the Antiquities’ Collections Manager Helen Hovey. We’ve also had the specialist help of Ben Altshuler and Sarah Norodom for RTI capture of our more challenging stones.
Former members of the team still keep in touch. Dr Jane Masséglia (who used to work on education and public communication for the project) is now a lecturer in Ancient History at the University of Leicester. Dr Hannah Cornwell (who used to work on the project’s online database, digital images and podcasts) is now a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow at the Institute of Classical Studies.

Diyala Archaeological Database (DiyArDa) Update

April 18, 2016 Diyala Release Letter



Summary of Changes:
1. Published 1,769 new object images to the Diyala site.
2. Adjusted find information displays in various ways.
3. Added Floor information display capabilities to the screens and to the database.
 

Describing Egypt

Describing Egypt
This is an ambitious self initiated project aiming - with a nod and a wink to the old Description de l'Égypte - to Describe Egypt one location at a time but this time around we do it through Egyptian Eyes. We are in love with this country and its long and diverse history and we want to share our heritage with the whole world through the latest available technology, we chose 360º VR immersive experience to be our medium, that way we allow you to walk through locations that is difficult to access due to it being closed by authorities for preservation or due to the fact that you cannot come and visit it yourself, whatever your reasons are we bring it right to your screen.

But we don't want to only show you pretty pictures, we want to tell you the stories from these locations, stories of their owners and their life and death, follow the progression of art, culture and architecture across Egypt's long, rich and diverse history.

We are currently focusing on the Ancient Egyptian Tombs of The 30 Dynasties reign which spans across 3000 years (2859 years to be exact from 3200 BC to 341 BC) we take Examples from the three Major kingdoms, the Old kingdom [3200 BC - 2780 BC] in Memphis (currently a suburb of cairo) 3rd to 6th dynasties , the Middle Kingdom [2134 BC - 1778 BC] in Abydos ( currently El Minya) 11th and 12th dynasties and the New Kingdom [1570 BC - 1080 BC] in Thebes (Luxor) 18th to 20th dynasties.

We started working on and off on this project in 2012, it was originally 360fied.com but due to differences between the partners visions we have agreed to separate the paths and started all over again.
you can check out the fantastic work of our previous partner and very good friend Mr. Mohamed Attef here and here.
The Describing Egypt project is currently done in collaboration between Motion Designer, Compositor and Photographer Salma ElDardiry and software Developer and Tech master Karim Mansour.

We are working with a great set of advisors and collaborators who includes Dr. Thierry Benderitter of www.osirisnet.net, the good poeple of The Theban Mapping Project , Hani D. Elmasri of Disney imagineering and Prof. Dr. Abdel Ghaffar Shedid Founder and head of the Art History Department, Faculty of Fine Arts.

Conflict Urbanism Aleppo

Conflict Urbanism Aleppo
Conflict Urbanism: Aleppo is a project in two stages.

First, we have built an open-source, interactive, data-rich map of the city of Aleppo, at the neighborhood scale. Users can navigate the city, with the aid of high resolution satellite imagery from before and during the current civil war, and explore geo-located data about cultural sites and urban damage. We will add data as it becomes available; currently we are grateful for datasets from from Human Rights Watch, the United Nations Operational Satellite Applications Programme (UNOSAT), and the Humanitarian Information Unit (HIU) at the U.S. Department of State.

Second, the map is a platform into which additional data of all sorts can be integrated. It is an invitation to students and invited collaborators to record and narrate urban damage in Aleppo — at the cultural, infrastructural, or neighborhood scale — and to present that research in case studies which will be added to the website over time.

We invite ideas and propositions, and hope to build on the data that we have compiled here to develop further research on and engagement with the situation in Aleppo. It is a call for inquiry and a call to action.

Since 2012, the people of Aleppo — one of the oldest continuously-inhabited cities in the world — have been exposed to catastrophic violence. Many thousands have been injured, died, or fled. Our project focuses on their city and what has been done to it and what might happen to it in the future.

HODOI ELEKTRONIKAI: Du texte à l'hypertexte

[First posted in AWOL 28 June 2014, updated 25 April 2016]

HODOI ELEKTRONIKAI: Du texte à l'hypertexte

Auteur :

ACHILLES TATIUS AELIUS ARISTIDES ALBINUS (OS) DE SMYRNE ALEXANDRE D'APHRODISIAS ANDOCIDE ANONYME APPIEN D'ALEXANDRIE APOLLODORE (Ps.) d'Athènes
APOLLONIOS ARATUS ARISTOPHANE ARISTOTE ARRIEN ATHÉNÉE BARNABÉ BASILE DE CÉSARÉE CALLIMAQUE CALLISTRATE CÉBÈS CHARITON D'APHRODISE CLÉMENT D'ALEXANDRIE DÉMOSTHÈNE DENYS d'HALICARNASSE DINARQUE DIOGÈNE LAËRCE DIODORE DION CASSIUS DION CHRYSOSTOME ÉLIEN ÉPHREM LE SYRIEN ESCHINE ESCHYLE ÉSOPE EURIPIDE EUSÈBE DE CÉSARÉE ÉVAGRE le SCOLASTIQUE FLAVIUS JOSÈPHE PS.-FLAVIUS JOSÈPHE GALIEN GRÈGOIRE DE NAZIANZE GRÈGOIRE DE NYSSE HÉLIODORE HÉRMES TRISMÉGISTE HÉRODIEN HÉRODOTE HÉSIODE HIPPOCRATE de Cos HOMÈRE
ISOCRATE
ISÉE
JEAN CHRYSOSTOME
JULIEN l'APOSTAT
JUSTIN
LONGUS
LUCIEN
LYCOPHRON
LYSIAS
MARC AURELE
MAXIME DE TYR
MUSÉE le grammairien
NONNUS DE PANOPOLIS
ORACULA SIBYLLINA
ORIGÈNE
PAUSANIAS
PHILON
PHILOSTRATE
PHOTIUS Ier de Constantinople
PINDARE
PLATON
PLOTIN
PLUTARQUE
POLYBE
PORPHYRE
PROCLUS
PROCOPE
Ps.-LONGIN
QUINTUS DE SMYRNE
SEPTANTE (LA)
SEXTUS EMPIRICUS
SOCRATE LE SCOLASTIQUE
SOPHOCLE
STRABON
SYNESIUS DE CYRÈNE
TATIEN
THÉODORET DE CYR
THÉOGNIS DE MÉGARE
THÉOPHILE D'ANTIOCHE
THÉOPHRASTE
THUCYDIDE
TRYPHIODORE
XÉNOPHON
XÉNOPHON D'ÉPHÈSE
ZOSIMUS