Thursday, July 19, 2018

Paratexts of the Bible

Paratexts of the Bible
http://paratexbib.eu/images/header.jpg

Analysis and Edition of the Greek Textual Transmission
This project takes a new look at an old text. The Bible is a fundamental book for the history of religious beliefs, cultural history, art history as well as many other fields. For centuries it has been read and copied multiple times. Thousands of medieval manuscripts survive. The process of transmission is con¬sidered here from a totally new perspective. While biblical manuscripts have so far been largely ana¬lysed as witnesses to an original text (“Urtext”), this project approaches each manuscript as a single witness to an act of reading and re-interpreting the text. In recent literary theory, attention has been drawn to “paratexts”, i.e. all material accompanying a main text. Virtually all biblical manuscripts have some of these features. Examples include brief introductions, biographies, tables of contents, poems, cross-references, prayers, and indexes.

However, these paratexts have been neglected by scholars for two reasons: firstly because biblical studies traditionally concentrate on the “inspired text” itself; secondly because of the sheer amount of available material, which far exceeds the capacities of a single scholar. Moreover, being very short, these paratexts have often remained below the detection threshold, and since we are dealing with a rich and “liquid” transmission, many of them also present a methodological challenge. 

The project therefore adopts a new approach. Firstly, it catalogues all available material in an e Clavis, taking into account recent developments in the fields of structural codicology and digital technology. Secondly, it develops a set of categories according to which each paratext of the New Testament is edited according to internal criteria. This is done with a view to the intrinsic value of each manuscript witness. The final result will be a comprehensive and totally new picture of the Biblical text’s “journey” through the centuries.

Open Access Monograph Series: Classics Textbooks

Classics Textbooks
Series Consultant: John Henderson


Ideal for school-level and University students of Latin, and for anybody studying the language for the first time, these Open Access textbooks present extracts from major works including Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Virgil’s Aeneid and Tacitus’s hair-raising descriptions of the excesses of the Emperor Nero in the Annals

The Latin is accompanied by extensive commentary that explores the meaning and context of the works, while interpretative essays serve as a model for students developing their own critical writing. Many of our engaging and lucid textbooks also offer study questions and background information as well as the latest scholarship. Also available in free interactive editions with teachers’ comments, they are vital resources for all students of Latin.

Dickinson College Commentaries
OBP and Dickinson College partnered to create books that offer enhanced key texts in Latin in Open Access format. Our joint Series appears as both free web resources hosted on the DCC website and as interactive texts released in a variety of formats.
 

Standards for Networking Ancient Prosopographies (SNAP:DRGN)

Standards for Networking Ancient Prosopographies (SNAP:DRGN)
SNAP:DRGN is building a virtual authority list for ancient people through Linked Data collection of common information from many collaborating projects. The graph will provide: 1. identifiers for all persons who appear in one or more corpora and catalogues; 2. gold standard normalization data for parsing and proofing tools; 3. visualization of ancient persons, names, titles and relationships; 4. research tools for historians; 5. standards and software contributing to the Linked Ancient World Data community.

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

InsAph: Inscriptions of Aphrodisias Online

InsAph: Inscriptions of Aphrodisias Online
The aim of this project is to build on the experience gained on the EPAPP project. That project, funded by the Leverhulme trust, allowed us to develop a volume of some 250 inscriptions, using the Epidoc markup principles; the Inscriptions of Aphrodisias grant allowed us to further refine the volume and publish it as http://insaph.kcl.ac.uk/ala2004/.

In the course of that process we learned a great deal about how to develop and apply the guidelines; we also established some very good relationships with other scholars in the field. Our intention now is to develop the use of Epidoc markup not only for the eventual publication of inscriptions, but also as a tool for editing them and preparing them for publication. We also intend to work closely at every stage with other colleagues and other projects, so that we can support one another in developing our approaches to electronic publication, and achieve a reasonable level of compatibility between projects.
On this site we intend to publish more material from Aphrodisias, as it becomes ready for publication. At the same time, the editors of the inscriptions, Angelos Chaniotis (in Heidelberg) Joyce Reynolds (in Cambridge) and Charlotte Roueche (in London) together with the excavators, Christopher Ratte (in New York) and Bert Smith (in Oxford) intend to use the web as a work area for preparing increasing amounts of material for publication. We may well not be able to publish all the inscriptions of Aphrodisias in this way before the end of the project: but we should by then have established the guidelines and the protocols for doing so.

Forthcoming Open Access Journal: The Bulletin of the Munich Open-Access Cuneiform Corpus Initiative

The Bulletin of the Munich Open-Access Cuneiform Corpus Initiative
Kopfzeile
This occasional open-access publication is intended to correct, supplement, and update information published by the Neo-Assyrian Text Corpus (NATC) Project (directed by Simo Parpola; University of Helsinki), Royal Inscriptions of Mesopotamia (RIM) Project (directed by A. Kirk Grayson; University of Toronto), and Royal Inscriptions of the Neo-Assyrian Period (RINAP) Project (directed by Grant Frame; University of Pennsylvania). Contributions to the Bulletin are primarily intended to highlight both important and minor differences between the freely accessible online version of a text hosted on the Open Richly Annotated Cuneiform Corpus (Oracc) Project and its original publication.

The notes, the corrigenda and addenda, corrected reprints of published pages, and original studies published here will mainly serve as platform for the LMU-based Official Inscriptions of the Middle East in Antiquity (OIMEA) and Archival Texts of the of Middle East in Antiquity (ATMEA) Projects to disseminate relevant information about variety of ancient texts. BMOCCI is not intended to only include material written by the OIMEA and ATMEA staff. Scholars and students interested in contributing a note or article on official inscriptions and archival texts are encouraged to submit a contribution.

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

RAI64 workshop resources

RAI64 workshop resources
This post links to the online resources used in Eleanor's part of the Oracc workshop at RAI64 in Innsbruck, 18 July 2018.
  1. New Easy Oracc (NEO)
  2. Nammu text-editor
  3. Virtual Oracc projects for teaching

Call for Papers: Digital Classics issue of Studia UBB Digitalia

Digital Classics issue of Studia UBB Digitalia
July 17th, 2018 by Gabriel Bodard

Forwarded for Annamária Pázsint:
We are pleased to announce the call for papers for the following number of the journal Studia UBB Digitalia, which will be dedicated to digital classics, ancient history and archaeology.
Please find below details regarding the publication:
Studia UBB Digitalia (ISSN 2559-6721) is the official journal of the Transylvania Digital Humanities Center – DigiHUBB (Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania). It is a peer-reviewed, open access scholarly publication, indexed in CEEOL and dealing with subjects of general interest in the field of digital humanities.
Its following number (4/2018) will be dedicated to digital classics, ancient history & archaeology, with a special focus on projects and initiatives pertaining to these fields. The subjects can include, but are not limited to, digital approaches to geo-visualization, non-invasive archaeological prospections, markup, scholarly annotation, photogrammetry, databases, etc.
The call in open to all scientists of the field, but we strongly encourage submissions from career researchers.
The deadline for submissions is November 1st 2018 and for the Authors Guidelines, please see the dedicated page on the journal’s website. For additional questions on this number of Studia UBB Digitalia, please contact dr. Rada Varga (radavarga@gmail.com.

Proceedings of the 12th International Congress of Cretan Studies Online

Proceedings of the 12th International Congress of Cretan Studies Online
ISBN: 978-960-9480-35-2
The 12th International Congress of Cretan Studies (12th ICCS) was held in Heraklion from 21 to 25 September 2016 and organised by the Society of Cretan Historical Studies. The Congress was divided into three parallel sections corresponding to Antiquity, the Medieval period and the Modern period, along the thematic axis of mobility of people, ideas, and goods, to, from and within the island of Crete. A total of 319 original presentations were made by Greek and foreign scholars specialising in a variety of disciplines. The languages of the Congress are Greek, English, French, German and Italian. 

The online publication of the Proceedings of the 12th International Congress of Cretan Studies is organised by the Society of Cretan Historical Studies with the generous support of the Stavros Niarchos Foundation. The papers will be uploaded gradually within four months of their submission, following a review, editing and formatting process. The publication is expected to be completed by mid-2018. 

Since its establishment by the Society of Cretan Historical Studies (SCHS) in 1961, the International Congress of Cretan Studies has been held every five years in the capital of each of the four Prefectures of Crete in turn. The International Congresses of Cretan Studies has been a platform for important presentations on archaeology, history, literature, ethnology, linguistics and other fields and their Proceedings continue to play a vital role in the study of Cretan history and culture.

Open Access Journal: Lucerna Newsletters

Lucerna Newsletters
http://www.romanfinds.org.uk/public/images/03004002.jpg
Current and recent print editions of Lucerna are available solely to members of the Roman Finds Group. Published twice-yearly, this newsletter is now past its 50th edition.

Lucerna contains all that this website does, and even more: articles submitted by members, recently-discovered artefacts, appeals for help with identification, as well as information on all the page headings above, in greater detail, such as summaries of study days and conferences, book reviews and forthcoming events.

Contributions are always welcome - short notes or longer articles - so please send them to our editor Matt Fittock (see 'RFG Committee' page), and share your knowledge, information and requests with the rest of the Roman Finds Group.

Older editions of Lucerna are available to download free of charge below. More recent editions of Lucerna, along with all RFG Datasheets, can be accessed via our 'members login' area, at the bottom of this page.

(Please note that contact details of current committee members should be taken from our 'RFG Committee' page above, not from these archive Lucernae.)
Glynn J.C. Davis
Bone Spatulate Strips From Roman London
6
Tatiana Ivleva
Ongoing Research:
Global Glass Adornments Event Horizon in the
Late Iron Age and Roman Period Frontiers
(100 BC - AD 250)

15
Ben Paites
The Manufacture and Symbolism of Radiating
Designs on Brooches in Roman Britain

14-21
John Pearce, Sally Worrell and Frank Basford
Mars, Roma or Love. Actually?
A New Monogram Brooch from Britain

22-23
Philip Smither
Ongoing Research:
Romano-British Weighing Instruments

24-25
Humphreys, 0wen and Marshall, Michael
“The same, but different”: a miscellany of ‘Bügelzangen’ and related objects from Roman London
4-14
K. Adams, D. Boughton, A. Byard, R. Griffiths, M. Phelps, D. Williams, J. Pearce and S. Worrell
From figurines to fob-danglers: finds from PAS
25-29
Barbara Birley,
Keeping up appearances: the wooden hair combs from Vindolanda
5
Gill Dunn
Recent finds from Chester focusing on finds from the amphitheatre
5
Nicholas Ford
EXPLORING SECONDARY USE AND MEANING IN ROMAN COINS WITH REFERENCE TO A NUMMUS OF DIOCLETIAN
8-10
Greep, Stephen and Marshall, Michael
Brigantian immigrants to Londinium? New finds of perforated bone ‘spoons’
2-7
Worrell, Sally
Mystery objects (bronze ?vessel fragment with relief, gilded disc brooch, and ithyphallic figurines)
21
Dobson, Rebecca
Ritual or refuse? A summary of an artefact assemblage from the river Tees, Piercebridge
2-4
Lydamore, Chris with Hall, Jenny and Jackson, Ralph
Nodge Nolan obituary
5-6
Greep, Stephen
Red deer at the end of Roman Britain- a change in diet, hunting practices or new industrial processes?
7-9
 Wardle, Angela and Marshall, Michael
  Two obsidian objects from Roman London (probably handles)
1-2
Worrell, Sally and Pearce, John
A selection of Roman artefacts recorded by the Portable Antiquities Scheme in 2012
4-8
Greep, Stephen
Some more fishes? (bone fish pendants)
13
Bowsher, Julian and Marshall, Michael
A first glance at two prehistoric objects from Roman London
 
Cool, Hilary; Briggs, Stephen; Irving, Pam; Ward, Margaret; Henig, Martin
Glenys Lloyd-Morgan: an appreciation; the life; the young archaeologist; Glenys at Chester; Glenys and Venus
1-5
Crummy, Nina
Glenys Lloyd-Morgan: a bibliography
5-8
Swift, Ellen
An Iron Age helmet from Kent
9
Henig, Martin
The Silchester eagle: a comment
32-33
Durham, Emma
The Silchester eagle
7-8
Greep, Stephen
Five little fishes…or more? (bone fish pendants)
8-11
Mackreth, Donald
Dragonesque brooches (list including PAS items)
11-12
de Jersey, Philip
Jersey: a new coin hoard (iron age coins)
12
Friendship-Taylor, Roy
Mystery object
13
Friendship-Taylor, Roy and Greep, Stephen
A Claudian pit-group of bone hinges and box fittings from a ‘military’ latrine pit beneath the Piddington phase 1b proto-villa
2-9
Mackreth, Donald
Brooches needing a home (plea from specialist who wants to return finds to excavators)
9-10
Statton, Michelle
A follow-up on the AHRC collaborative doctoral awards, with an introduction to a study on dress, adornment and identity in late Iron Age and Roman Britain
16-19
Aggujaro, Angela
Roman razor from Bishop’s Cleeve, Cheltenham
3-5
Ferris, Iain
Images of disabled and Africans/black people (plea for information)
7
Dearne, Martin
A flagon lid from Enfield and a note on the type
3-5
Feugère, Michel
The Artefacts Project: an encyclopaedia of archaeological small finds
4-6
McIntosh, Frances
Wirral brooch: a regional variant of Roman bow brooch
3-5
Sherlock, David
Towards a typology of Romano-British spoons
5-8
Reynolds, Julie
A puzzling object from South Wales- any clues gratefully received (unusual pair of tweezers)
8
Payne, Naomi and Durham, Emma
The little horse from Chalk Pit Field, Sedgeford, Norfolk.
9-10
McIntosh, Frances
Brooch patterns? (lead trumpet brooch)
10
Daubney, Adam
Romano-British ‘ToT’ rings- some variations
3-4
Crummy, Nina
Evidence for an Isis cult in Colchester
4-5
Timby, Jane and Rigby, Val
Gallo-Belgic pottery database
5
Hobbs, Richard
British Museum collections now just one click away
6-7
Friendship Taylor, Roy (with Feugère, Michel)
Mystery object identified (as Etruscan strainer) (see Lucerna 35)
13-14
O’Riordan, Emma Jane
Small finds in the bigger picture: 3D scanning of archaeological objects for education and interpretation
3-10
Henig, Martin
A valedictory forbidding mourning (retrospective on his career as a small finds expert)
10-11
Dearne, Martin
A little poser from Enfield (possible Roman horse harness mount)
11-13
Dawson, Alan
‘Minerva’ wax spatula handle from near Norwich
2
Friendship-Taylor, Roy
Mystery object
2
Williams, Sandie
Plea for bells
3
Scott, Wendy
Possible temple site in Leicestershire
3
Webb, Dave
A patera/trulleum from Clay Farm, Cambridgeshire. Notes from ongoing research and the development of an online resource
2-5
Lydamore, Chris
A bath saucer from near Harlow, Essex
6
Lydamore, Chris
A possible method of producing barbed projectile heads in the late Roman period
6-8
Mould, Quita
A double-headed button and loop fastener from Reighton, North Yorkshire
2-6
Shaffrey, Ruth
The puddingstone rotary querns from Springhead Roman town, Kent
6-10
Kiernan, Philip
The Roman model objects project
2-3
Hobbs, Richard
Unusual silver spoon fragment
4
Crummy, Nina
A jug handle from Silchester
4-6
Schuster, Jorn et al
A late 5th – 6th century context (for a brooch) from Springhead, Kent
2-3
Jackson, Ralph
Unusual greyhound brooch
4
Hill, JD & Crummy, Nina
Late Iron-Age shears from Hertfordshire
2-4
Pooley, Laura
A gilded bone hairoin from Colchester
5
Puls, Jodi
Roman hairpins from Hampshire
6
Watters, Julian
Figurine of Harpcrates
7
Hobbs, Richard
Unusual Roman ‘test piece’
8
Williams, Sandie
Two bone stoppers from Silchester
9
Jackson, Ralph
An enamelled bronze pan from Staffordshire Moorlands, England: a souvenir from Hadrian’s Wall
10
Palmer, John
Catalogue of Roman Purbeck mortars
2-4
Major, Hilary
A pincer-type brooch from Southwark
5
Booth, Paul
Late Roman spurs from Lankhills, Winchester
6
Crummy, Nina
An unusual lamp from Colchester
7
Reece, Richard
The new Corinium Museum
8-9
Williams, Sandie
Tubular ferrules
9-11
Cool, Hilary
Brooches and moulds from Dymock
22
Jackson, Ralph
An unusual weapon find from Roman Britain
2-3
Wallace, Colin
(Portable) pine cone symbolism in Roman Britain
4-6
Friendship-Taylor, Roy
A new pair of Agathangelus type tweezers from Piddington Roman villa
6
Eckardt, Hella & Crummy, Nina
Presenting the body – toilet instruments in Roman Britain
7
Tracey, Justine
Purbeck marble inscriptions in Silchester
8-10
Minter, Faye
Strap fasteners from Suffolk
12-14
Worrell, Sally
Some new late Roman rivet spurs
20-22
Crummy, Nina
Using the Portable Antiquities Scheme data for research (using nail cleaners as a source)
23-27
Major, Hilary
The dating of Puddingstone querns
2-4
Bolton, Angie
Ox-head bucket mounts – a plea for details
4-5
Cool, Hilary
A soldier from Herculaneum
5-7
Hoffman, Birgitta
A brief note on the end date of the Cipius Polybius skillets
8-9
Herepath, Nick
A survey of Roman brooches from Cheshire
9-12
Herepath, Nick
‘Jelly baby’ mounts from Yorkshire
13
Crummy, Nina
And there’s more (wax  spatula handles)
21
Tongue, James
Seal boxes from Britain – a morphological review
23-41
Jackson, Ralph
A new treasure and a new goddess for Roman Britain
2-4
Crummy, Nina
Hunter-god handle from Yorkshire
5-6
McSloy, Ed
A zoomorphic clasp-knife handle from Gloucester
6-8
Cambridge, Owen & Watt, Tommy
The northernmost Roman brooch from Britain
8
Feugere, Michel
Penknives from Newstead: writing accessories
9-11
Hobbs, Richard
New iron Age site from East Leicestershire
12-14
Pugsley, Paola
Pasta shapes
14-15
Croom, Alex
Sexing brooches
16-19
Eckardt, Hella & Hobbs, Richard
An unusual decorated candlestick from Springhead, Kent
2-5
Robinson, Dan & Clarke, Vanessa
Possible temple inscription found in Chester
6
Grew, Francis & Brown, Gary
Londiniensium – cast in stone
7-8
Snape, Margaret
A worked stone from the vicus at South Shields (Arbeia)
8
Jackson, Ralph & Friendship-Taylor, Roy
The Piddington gladiator clasp-knife
9-11
Hill, JD
A pair of silver penannular brooches from Wheathampstead
11-12
Wardle, Angela
Ivory implements from London
12-13
Worrell, Sally
More Minerva bust wax spatula handles
13
Crummy, Nina
Other types of wax spatula from Britain
14-17
Pugsley, Paola
An item of Roman coopered furniture from Dorchester (Dorset)
7-10
Worrell, Sally
Some portable antiquities from Hampshire and Wiltshire
13-14
Geake, Helen
New wax spatula from Suffolk
14-15
Greep, Stephen
More amulets (Silchester)
15
Eckardt, Hella
Candlesticks in Roman Britain
15-16
Cool, Hilary
The Catterick Gallus
18-21
Major, Hilary
Roman decorated iron styli
2-6
Crummy, Nina
Wax spatula handle from Yorkshire
6-8
Johns, Catherine
A gold amulet-pendant from Eaton Constantine, Shropshire
9-10
Dunn, Gillian
Bronze vessels from Middlewich
11
Eckardt & Crummy
Ivory folding-knife handle from Silchester
12-13
Abauzit, Pierre
No more mystery? Bone phalluses - an explanation for the mystery widgets in Lucerna 22
13-14
Harrison, Emma
Box appeal – boxes found from Grateley South, Hants
14-15
Codreanu-Windauer, Silvia & Bartei, Antja
(Trans, Eckardt & Crummy)
Spindle, Whorl, Pot – a remarkable group of grave goods from Bavaria
17-27
Crummy, Nina
Nail-cleaners: regionality at the clean edge of Empire
2-6
Wardle, Angela
Mystery widgets – 2 unusual bone objects from London
7
Stokes, Mike with contributions from Henig, M & Johns, C
Rings and things
7-8
Pugsley, Paola
Etruscan hinged shoes
9-10
Penny, Stephen
Lead salt pans
11
Cotton, Jon
Bibliography of sets of gaming counters
12-13
Pugsley, Paola
Of Timotei and boxwood combs
3-6
Hembrey, Nicola
Help needed – mystery sandstone ?table fragment
7
Crummy, Nina
Toy storey – stacked counters from Colchester
7
Carter, Barry
Two lead bull heads from Cambridgeshire
7-8
Paynton, Ceinwen
Button-and-loop fasteners in a Roman province: A step towards a regional typology?
8-9
Pugsley, Paola
Wooden combs and niche markets
9-10
Cooke, Nick
Antler combs, big hair and the Mafia in late Roman Britain – an e-mail correspondence
3-7
Eckardt, Hella
An imported candlestick from Silchester
8
Crummy, Nina
An unusual brooch from Heybridge
8-9
Carter, Barry
A lead model from St Albans
10
Crummy, Nina et al
Agathangelus stamp
10-11
Snape, Margaret
Some unusual brooches from Arbeia Roman fort, South Shields
12
Cool, Hilary
Hairstyles and lifestyles
3-6
Crummy, Nina
A late Roman grave group from Durobrivae
7-10
Cool Hilary
Surfing the database
9-10
Allason-Jones, Lindsay
Gilding the black lily
11-12
Carter Barry
Lead brooches from Gloucester
12-13
Cooper, Nick
Mystery objects from excavations at Scole, Norfolk/Suffolk 1993-94
3-6
Crimmins, Julia &
Keally, Claire
A fibula in Dublin
6-8
Riddler, Ian
Hone News from Abroad:  The Clausentium Lamella
3
Guest, Peter
Johns, Catherine
The Hoxne Hoard – an update
4-8
Dearne, Martin
Research into Brooch Catchplate Return Decoration
3-4
Allen, Vincent
Mystery objects from Clausentium
- bone objects
6
Pollard, Richard
A ceramic cult figure from Leicester
Longer version published in Britannia 29 (1998)
2-4
Hoffman, Birgitta
Millefiori gaming counters
5-6
Ponting, Matthew
Roman Military Metalwork from Masada and Gamla, Israel: the chemistry of soldier and civilian in first century Palestine
7-9
Cool, Hilary
Panelled enamel vessels
2-3
Snape, Margaret
First century brooches on the northern frontier
2-5
Mackreth, Don
Colchesters in the North
5-8
Seeley, Fiona
An enigmatic object from Scole
12
Lucerna 10, November 1995
Wallace, Colin
Gallo-Roman clay figurines: how to find your way around the literature
2-5
Dearne, Martin
Spoon brooches
6
Wise, Philip
A fragment of Roman silver plate from Ratley and Upton
7-8
Lucerna 9, June 1995
Dearne, Martin
A burning question (Roman coal use in Britain)

(Later article published:
Dearne, M. I. & Branigan K. The use of coal in Roman Bntain Ant. J.75 (1995), 71-105)
3-4
Seeley, Fiona
Roman doorbells
5-6
Lucerna 8, March 1994
Croom, Alex & Snape, Margaret
Grave goods from the cemetery at Arbeia Roman fort, South Shields
1-2
Lucerna 7, April 1993
Lucerna 6, July 1992
Cool, Hilary
Introducing - Empty Vessels Signifying Something: An introduction to the common types of drinking vessels found on Romano-British sites
4-8
Kennett, D H
Introducing – An Introduction to late Roman bronze vessels and their literature
9-13
Lucerna 5, February 1992
Snape, Margaret
A Roman or Sub Roman Brooch

2-3
Clay, Patrick
Lead seal rewrites history
– Roman lead seal from Thorpe by Glebe
4-5
Lucerna 4, September 1991
Mackreth, Don
Brooch stamps in third-century Britain
2-3
Appleton, Graham
An introduction to the literature on Roman garden decoration with special reference to sculpture
4-8
Lucerna 3, January 1991
Jones, Christine
Annum Novum Faustum Felicem Mihi!
- Ceramic lamp celebrating the New Year
3-4
Davies, John
A late Roman bronze punch from Hampshire
5-7
Dearne, Martin
A Hebridean brooch
8
Bishop, Mike
An introduction to the literature on Lorica Segmentata
9-12
Davies, John
An introduction to the literature on Roman coins from British sites
13-16
Lucerna 2, Spring 1990
Evans, David
Column base from the extra-mural settlement at Caerleon: Gwent
7-9
Jones, Christine
An identification problem unhinged – bone hinges
10-12
Lloyd-Morgan, Glynnis
An introduction to Roman mirrors and their literature
13-18
Bayley, Justine
Castleford moulds – bronze flask
(Request for parallels)
4
Clay, Patrick
A Roman clasp knife from the Shires excavation, Leicester
5-6
Cool, Hilary
An introduction to the literature on Romano-British brooches
8-12
Duncan, Holly
Roman boxwood comb
13-15