Wednesday, August 15, 2018

Open Access Journal: Papers from the Institute of Archaeology, University College London

 [First posted in AWOL 13 November 2009. Updated 15 August 2018]

Papers from the Institute of Archaeology, University College London
ISSN (print) 0965-9315
ISSN (online) 2041-9015
Papers from the Institute of Archaeology (PIA) is a peer reviewed, open access journal that publishes research on all aspects of archaeology, museum studies, cultural heritage and conservation. Run by graduate students at the UCL Institute of Archaeology, the aim of PIA is to provide authors with experience in publishing articles early in their careers. We therefore place extra emphasis on the provision of peer review feedback and editorial assistance.

The PIA Forum and Interview sections also provide valuable insights from established scholars.

Tuesday, August 14, 2018

Open Access Journal: Arabian Epigraphic Notes: An Open Access Online Journal on Arabian Epigraphy

 [First posted in AWOL 4 January 2016, updated 14 August 2018]

Arabian Epigraphic Notes: An Open Access Online Journal on Arabian Epigraphy
ISSN: 2451-8875
The Arabian Peninsula contains one of the richest epigraphic landscapes in the Old World, and new texts are being discovered with every expedition to its deserts and oases. Arabian Epigraphic Notes is a forum for the publication of these epigraphic finds, and for the discussion of relevant historical and linguistic issues. The Arabian Peninsula is broadly defined as including the landmass between the Red Sea and the Arabo-Persian gulf, and stretching northward into the Syrian Desert, Jordan, and adjacent cultural areas. In order to keep up with the rapid pace of discoveries, our online format will provide authors the ability to publish immediately following peer-review, and will make available for download high resolution, color photographs. The open-access format will ensure as wide a readership as possible.
AEN invites original articles and short communications dealing with the Ancient South Arabian, Ancient North Arabian, Nabataean (and Aramaic in general), Arabic, and Greek epigraphy from the Arabian Peninsula, but also from other areas so long as the link to Arabia and its cultures is clear. The language of the Journal is English. Review articles will also be considered.
Arabian Epigraphic Notes is essential reading for all interested in the languages and scripts of the ancient Near East, and of interest to students of Northwest Semitic epigraphy, Cuneiform studies, Egyptology, and classical antiquity. We hope that the journal will contribute to our understanding of the languages and cultures of Arabia, from their earliest attestations until the contemporary period. It is hoped that the journal’s accessibility will further help integrate the epigraphy and languages of ancient Arabia into the broader field of Semitic Philology.

Volumes



Texts Added to the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae (TLG®) on August 10, 2018

Texts Added to the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae (TLG®) on August 10, 2018
Updated on: 2018-08-10
2710 LEO BARDALAS Epigr.
2718 Manuel PHILES Scr. Eccl., Scr. Rerum Nat. et Poeta
3089 Nicephorus CHRYSOBERGES Orat. et Rhet.
3200 Manuel II PALAEOLOGUS Imperator Theol. et Rhet.
3205 THEODORUS II DUCAS LASCARIS Theol. et Rhet.
3236 Nicephorus Callistus XANTHOPULUS Hist. et Theol.
3315 ANONYMA PALAEOLOGICA Encom.
3384 PHOTIUS DIACONUS Theol.
3385 LEONTIUS Monachus Hagiogr.
3386 MICHAEL Monachus Theol.
4031 EUSTRATIUS Phil.
4090 CYRILLUS Alexandrinus Theol.
4201 Joannes CHORTASMENUS Philol. et Rhet.
4445 Georgius SCYLITZES Poeta
4466 Georgius LAPITHES Theol.
4470 LEO MEGISTUS Rhet.
4471 THEODORUS II IRENICUS PATRIARCHA Phil.
4472 Philippus MONOTROPUS Theol.
5150 VITAE SANCTI SPYRIDONIS Hagiogr.
5152 MIRACULA SANCTI MENAE Hagiogr.
5153 VITAE SANCTORUM GALACTIONIS ET EPISTEMES Hagiogr.
5323 ACTA MONASTERII SANCTI IOANNIS PRODROMI IN PETRA Eccl., Acta et Legal.
5510 CARMINA ANONYMA E CODICE VATICANO GR. 743 Phil.
9009 Michael APOSTOLIUS Paroemiogr.
9056 ARSENIUS AUTORIANUS Acta et Eccl.
9058 Meletius PEGAS Patriarcha Hagiogr.
9059 Georgius CHRYSOGONUS Phil. et Theol.

Silchester Iron Age and Roman Town

Silchester Iron Age and Roman Town
Exploring the Iron Age and Roman site and wider landscape of Calleva Atrebatum
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About Silchester

Find out about the history of the Silchester site and the excavations of the Iron Age and Roman town of Calleva Atrebatum.
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Silchester iPhone App

Enjoy a trip to Silchester Roman Town. Find out about Silchester iPhone App
Working at Silchester

Silchester Archaeology Projects

Find out about the excavations at the site from the Victorian era to the present day Nero and Environs projects
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Study archaeology

Find out about the courses on offered by the Department of Archaeology at Reading.
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Discoveries

See some of the exciting artefacts that have been discovered at Silchester.
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Silchester and the media

Get details of media coverage about Silchester and find out how to contact the press team.


Online Corpus of Attic Vase Inscriptions

[First posted in AWOL 24 February 2009. Updated 14 August 2018]

Corpus of Attic Vase Inscriptions
Pottery is a critical tool in our understanding of the society, art, and language of ancient Greece. Most vase painters who worked in Attica—the area of Greece surrounding Athens—were active during the sixth to fourth centuries BC. Their work was often inscribed either directly into the clay or by painting the surface. Henry Immerwahr's Corpus of Attic Vase Inscriptions is an attempt to catalog these inscribed vases. It contains 8,173 entries and is the result of more than sixty years of research. Each entry is given a local identifier and indicates which collection the vase belongs to (and the inventory number where possible). The entries then have four parts:
  • Section A documents the type of vase, place of discovery if known, painter or potter or both, date, and bibliography;
  • Section B contains a short description of the paintings;
  • Section C contains the inscriptions; and
  • Section D offers free commentary.
A significant number of the entries contain additional footnotes. No illustrations are provided. To learn more about the history of the corpus, read Immerwahr’s description of it. The material gathered in the corpus is the basis for an on-going project by Rudolf Wachter.

About the Author

Heinrich Rudolf (later Henry Rudolph) Leopold Immerwahr was born on February 28, 1916, in Breslau, Germany (now Wrocław, Poland). He earned a Dottore in Lettere at the University of Florence in 1938 and in the next year began a fellowship at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, where he met his future wife, Sara Anderson. The onset of war made Greece unsafe for foreign students, especially those of Jewish heritage. Henry was able to continue his fellowship at Yale, although travel to the U.S. in wartime was dogged with delays and setbacks. Though not an American citizen, Henry registered for the draft two days after his arrival in New York City. He spent two years both as a student at Yale and as (technically) an enemy alien in the U.S. His draft notice arrived in 1943 as he was in the throes of completing his graduate work. The bureaucratic move of transferring his registration site to Hartford, CT, gave him the extra month he needed to finish his dissertation and obtain his Ph.D. in Classics from Yale. He became a U.S. citizen at the same time and served his new country for two years, finding time to get married in the midst of a world war. After the war and a year spent studying at Harvard, Henry returned as an instructor to Yale, where his only child, Mary Elizabeth, was born. In 1957, he joined the Department of Classics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He rose to full professor in 1963 and to Alumni Distinguished Professor of Greek in 1975. Sara Immerwahr also taught at UNC, first part-time in UNC's Department of Classics and later in the Art Department, becoming a full professor in 1971. In 1977, Henry retired from UNC and became director of the American School of Classical Studies in Athens for a five-year term. In retirement, he continued to work on the Corpus of Attic Vase Inscriptions and other pursuits.

Oracc: The Open Richly Annotated Cuneiform Corpus Projects List

[First posted 1 July 2010. Most recently updated 14 August 2018]

Oracc: The Open Richly Annotated Cuneiform Corpus Projects List
 Oracc banner
Oracc is a collaborative effort to develop a complete corpus of cuneiform whose rich annotation and open licensing support the next generation of scholarly research. Created by Steve Tinney, Oracc is steered by Jamie Novotny, Eleanor Robson, Tinney, and Niek Veldhuis.

Idrimi: Statue of Idrimi

An up-to-date, searchable edition of the Idrimi inscription together with numerous annotations and bibliography. By Jacob Lauinger at Johns Hopkins University.

akklove: Akkadian Love Literature

AkkLove presents all early Akkadian literary texts related to love and sex known to date. The project is based on Wasserman, Akkadian Love Literature of the Third and Second Millennium BCE ( LAOS 4), Harrassowitz, 2016, where commentary to the texts and an introduction to the corpus are found.

AMGG: Ancient Mesopotamian Gods and Goddesses

Offers information about the fifty most important Mesopotamian gods and goddesses and provides starting points for further research.
Directed by Nicole Brisch and funded by the UK Higher Education Academy, 2011.

ARMEP: Ancient Records of Middle Eastern Polities

ARMEP, with its multi-project search engine, enables users to simultaneously search the translations, transliterations, and catalogues of multiple Oracc projects on which ancient records of Middle Eastern polities (especially those of the first millennium BC) are edited.
The project is based at LMU Munich (Historisches Seminar, Alte Geschichte) and funded by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. ARMEP is managed by Jamie Novotny and Karen Radner.

ARRIM Digital Archive: Digital Archive of the Annual Review of the Royal Inscriptions of Mesopotamia

Through the kind permission of Kirk Grayson and with funding provided by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, ARRIM Digital Archive makes all nine issues of “The Annual Review of the Royal Inscriptions of Mesopotamia" (1983-1991) freely available in searchable PDF files.
This digital archive is based at LMU Munich (Historisches Seminar, Alte Geschichte) and is managed by Jamie Novotny and Karen Radner.

blms: Bilinguals in Late Mesopotamian Scholarship

Long after Sumerian had died out as a spoken language, bilingual (Sumerian - Akkadian) texts still played a prominent role in the scholarly culture of Babylonia and Assyria. BLMS provides editions of bilingual narrative texts, hymns, proverbs, prayers, rituals, and incantations dating to the first millennium BCE.
Project Director: Steve Tinney; Editor: Jeremiah Peterson. With the assistance of Niek Veldhuis, Jamie Novotny, Joshua Jeffers, and Ilona Zsolnay. BLMS is supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

CAMS: Corpus of Ancient Mesopotamian Scholarship

Editions and translations of a wide range of Mesopotamian scholarly writings, contributed by many different people and projects.

CAMS/Anzu

Composite transliterations of the Epic of Anzu, prepared by Amar Annus for the book The Standard Babylonian Epic of Anzu (State Archives of Assyria, Cuneiform Texts 3), Helsinki: The Neo-Assyrian Text Corpus Project, 2001. Lemmatisation by Philip Jones.
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

CAMS/Barutu

Texts on extispicy (divination by the entrails of sacrificed animals). Currently contains only the Old Babylonian liver model BM 92668. The ordering of the omens was determined by Ruth Horry, the transliteration and translation made by Eleanor Robson.

CAMS/Etana: The Standard Babylonian Epic of Etana

Provides fully searchable manuscript transliterations of the Old Babylonian, Middle Assyrian and Neo-Assyrian versions of the Etana epic, prepared by Jamie Novotny for the book The Standard Babylonian Etana Epic (State Archives of Assyria, Cuneiform Texts 2), Helsinki: The Neo-Assyrian Text Corpus Project, 2001.
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns

CAMS/GKAB: CAMS Geography of Knowledge Corpus

Editions of scholarly tablets from Huzirina, Kalhu, and Uruk for the Geography of Knowledge project, comprising editions and translations of a wide range of Mesopotamian scholarly writings.
Project directed by Eleanor Robson at the University of Cambridge and funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council, 2007-12.

CAMS/Ludlul

Score and manuscript transliterations of Ludlul bēl nēmeqi, prepared by Amar Annus and Alan Lenzi for the book Ludlul Bēl Nēmeqi: The Standard Babylonian Poem of the Righteous Sufferer(State Archives of Assyria, Cuneiform Texts 7), Helsinki: The Neo-Assyrian Text Corpus Project, 2010.
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

CAMS/SelBI: CAMS/Seleucid Building Inscriptions

Third-century BC building inscriptions, from Borsippa and Uruk. Edition of the Antiochus (Borsippa) Cylinder by Kathryn Stevens; edition of the Anu-uballiṭs' inscriptions from Uruk by Eleanor Robson.

HIST3109: Temple Life in Assyria and Babylonia

Editions and translations of texts for the UCL Undergraduate Special Subject in History, Temple Life in Assyria and Babylonia (HIST3109), academic year 2017-18. Compiled by Eleanor Robson at UCL.

CASPo: Corpus of Akkadian Shuila-Prayers online

CCPo: Cuneiform Commentaries Project on ORACC

Provides fully searchable, annotated editions of text commentaries written by Assyrian and Babylonian scholars between the eighth and second centuries BCE. The texts commented on include literary, magical, divinatory, medical, legal, and lexical works.
Project Director: Eckart Frahm; Co-Director: Enrique Jiménez; Senior Editor: Mary Frazer.

CDLI: The Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative

The foundational online cataloging and archiving project for the cuneiform corpus, directed by Bob Englund at UCLA. The Oracc presentation is based directly on public CDLI data which is updated nightly.

CKST: Corpus of Kassite Sumerian Texts

Editions of Sumerian Kassite texts: Royal Inscriptions, Literary, and Lexical texts.

CMAwRo: Corpus of Mesopotamian Anti-witchcraft Rituals

CMAwRo presents online critical editions of Mesopotamian rituals and incantations against witchcraft.
The DFG-funded research project "Corpus babylonischer Rituale und Beschwörungen gegen Schadenzauber: Edition, lexikalische Erschließung, historische und literarische Analyse" is directed by Daniel Schwemer (University of Würzburg).

CMAwRo: Corpus of Mesopotamian Anti-witchcraft Rituals

CMAwRo presents online critical editions of Mesopotamian rituals and incantations against witchcraft. The text editions and translations are derived from the Corpus of Mesopotamian Anti-witchcraft Rituals (CMAwR; vol. 1, Brill: 2011).
The DFG-funded research project "Corpus babylonischer Rituale und Beschwörungen gegen Schadenzauber: Edition, lexikalische Erschließung, historische und literarische Analyse" is directed by Daniel Schwemer (University of Würzburg).

cmawro/cmawr2: cmawro/CMAwRo 2

cmawro/maqlu: cmawro/UPIEL94

Contrib: Contributions

Data contributed to Oracc for reuse by others, normally under the CC BY-SA license.

Amarna: The Amarna Texts

Contributed by Shlomo Izre'el, the Amarna corpus comprises transliterations of the 380 cuneiform tablets found at Tell el-Amarna (ancient Akhetaten) in Egypt. It contains diplomatic correspondence and Akkadian scholarly works from the mid-14th century BC.

contrib/lambert: The Notebooks of W.G. Lambert

W. G. Lambert (1926-2011) was an Assyriologist who spent much of his research time transliterating and copying cuneiform tablets in museums, especially the British Museum. His Nachlass included eight notebooks filled with handwritten transliterations of Babylonian and Assyrian texts. The notebooks contain more than five thousand transliterations, spread over nearly fifteen hundred pages. They are an astonishing record of sustained first-hand engagement with cuneiform tablets.

CTIJ: Cuneiform Texts Mentioning Israelites, Judeans, and Other Related Groups

Cuneiform texts and onomastic data pertaining to Israelites, Judeans, and related population groups during the Neo-Assyrian, Neo- and Late Babylonian, and Achaemenid Periods (744-330 BCE).
Project directed by Ran Zadok and Yoram Cohen, and funded by the "Ancient Israel" (New Horizons) Research Program of Tel Aviv University.

DCCLT: Digital Corpus of Cuneiform Lexical Texts

Editions and translations of lexical texts (word lists and sign lists) from all periods of cuneiform writing
Project directed by Niek Veldhuis at UC Berkeley and supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

DCCLT/ebla: DCCLT/Ebla Lexical Texts

Editions and translation of the unilingual and bilingual lexical texts from Ebla (ca. 2300 BCE). The editions were prepared by Marco Bonechi (Rome) and transformed for publication in DCCLT by Niek Veldhuis.

dcclt/Jena: dcclt/Lexical Texts in the Hilprecht Collection, Jena

Editions and translation of lexical texts from Nippur now in the Frau Professor Hilprecht Collection of the Friedrich Schiller University Jena. Editions by John Carnahan and Niek Veldhuis (Berkeley) with the assistance of Jay Chrisostomo (Ann Arbor), Kai Lämmerhirt, and Manfred Krebernik (Jena). Supported by a Mellon Project Grant of the Division of Arts and Humanities of the University of California at Berkeley.

DCCLT/Nineveh: DCCLT/Lexical Texts in the Royal Libraries at Nineveh

Nineveh provides editions of the lexical texts in the royal tablet collections discovered in the Assyrian capital. The project is supported by the NEH and was carried out in cooperation with the British Museum.

DCCLT/signlists: DCCLT/Reading the Signs

Editions and translations of all cuneiform sign lists from the middle of the third millennium B.C.E. until the end of cuneiform culture. The project is supported by the NEH.
Project directed by Niek Veldhuis. Editions by Emmanuelle Salgues, C. Jay Crisostomo, and John Carnahan.

DCCMT: Digital Corpus of Cuneiform Mathematical Texts

Catalogue of around a thousand published cuneiform mathematical tablets, with several hundred transliterations and translations.
Project run by Eleanor Robson at the University of Cambridge.

ETCSRI: Electronic Text Corpus of Sumerian Royal Inscriptions

An annotated, grammatically and morphologically analyzed, transliterated, trilingual (Sumerian-English-Hungarian), parallel corpus of all Sumerian royal inscriptions.
Directed by Gábor Zólyomi at Eötvos Loránd University, Budapest and funded by the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund (OTKA).

Geonames: Geographical Names in Oracc

Glass: Corpus of Glass Technological Texts

This project provides editions and translations for cuneiform technological recipes. The texts include Assyrian and Babylonian tablets that provide instructions for producing glass that imitates precious stones and procedures for processing perfumed oils. Directed by Eduardo A. Escobar at UC Berkeley

HBTIN: Hellenistic Babylonia: Texts, Iconography, Names

Cuneiform texts, iconography and onomastic data from Hellenistic Babylonia, primarily from Uruk. HBTIN texts form the demonstrator corpus of the Berkeley Prosopography Service (BPS).
Directed by Laurie Pearce at UC Berkeley.

ISSL: The Index to the Sumerian Secondary Literature

Over 70,000 references to the Sumerian secondary literature which also indexes all of the transliterations of word writings in ePSD.

LaOCOST: Law and Order: Cuneiform Online Sustainable Tool

This project illuminates how issues of law and gender were practiced in the ancient Near East, utilizing a digital corpus of legal and non-legal texts as its database. LaOCOST is directed by Ilan Peled.

LoveLyrics: A corpus of 1st mill. love rituals involving Marduk, Zarpanitum and Ištar

Edition of the corpus of 1st-millennium-BCE texts from Assyria and Babylonia with rituals and verbal ceremonies involving Marduk, Zarpanitu and Ištar of Babylon. By Rocío Da Riva (Universitat de Barcelona) and Nathan Wasserman (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem).
Photo: Clay plaque (87.160.79) depicting a goddess lying on a wedding bed, probably Ištar. © The Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Nimrud: Nimrud: Materialities of Assyrian Knowledge Production

A portal to all things related to the ancient Assyrian city of Nimrud (Kalhu/Calah), on Oracc and beyond. Explores how scientific and historical knowledge is made from archaeological objects.
Directed by Eleanor Robson at the University of Cambridge and funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council.

OBMC: Old Babylonian Model Contracts

Edition of the Corpus of Old Babylonian Model Contracts by Gabriella Spada.

OBTA: Old Babylonian Tabular Accounts

A catalogue and corpus of Old Babylonian tabular accounts by Eleanor Robson at University College London. Additions and corrections welcome.

OGSL: Oracc Global Sign List

Provides a global registry of sign names, variants and readings for use by Oracc.
Managed by Niek Veldhuis at UC Berkeley.

OIMEA: Official Inscriptions of the Middle East in Antiquity

OIMEA, with its multi-project search engine, enables users to simultaneously search the translations, transliterations, and catalogues of multiple Oracc projects on which official inscriptions are edited.
The project is based at LMU Munich (Historisches Seminar, Alte Geschichte) and funded by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. OIMEA is managed by Jamie Novotny and Karen Radner.

PNAo: Prosopography of the Neo-Assyrian Empire online

Provides a collection of additions and corrections to the printed fascicles of The Prosopography of the Neo-Assyrian Empire. A separate section is devoted to new information about Neo-Assyrian eponym officials. Compiled by Heather D. Baker at the University of Toronto.

Qcat: The Q Catalogue

Provides a global registry of compositions rather than objects, supporting the creation of scores on Oracc.
Managed by Eleanor Robson at the University of Cambridge.

RIAo: Royal Inscriptions of Assyria online

This project intends to present annotated editions of the entire corpus of Assyrian royal inscriptions, texts that were published in RIMA 1-3 and RINAP 1 and 3-4. This rich, open-access corpus has been made available through the kind permission of Kirk Grayson and Grant Frame and with funding provided by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.
RIAo is based at LMU Munich (Historisches Seminar, Alte Geschichte) and is managed by Jamie Novotny and Karen Radner. Kirk Grayson, Nathan Morello, and Jamie Novotny are the primary content contributors.

RIBo: Royal Inscriptions of Babylonia online

This project intends to present annotated editions of the entire corpus of Babylonian royal inscriptions from the Second Dynasty of Isin to the Neo-Babylonian Dynasty (1157-539 BC). This rich, open-access corpus has been made available through the kind permission of Rocío Da Riva and Grant Frame and with funding provided by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.
RIBo is based at LMU Munich (Historisches Seminar, Alte Geschichte) and is managed by Jamie Novotny and Karen Radner. Alexa Bartelmus, Rocío Da Riva, Grant Frame, and Jamie Novotny are the primary content contributors.

Scores: Scores of the Inscriptions of the Neo-Babylonian Dynasty

This sub-project presently includes score transliterations of the official inscriptions of Nabopolassar and Neriglissar. The ‘Babylon 7 Scores’ project will also include the scores of the royal inscriptions of Nebuchadnezzar II and Nabonidus.
Jamie Novotny adapted the scores contributed by Rocío Da Riva, which she had published in her The Inscriptions of Nabopolassar, Amel-Marduk and Neriglissar (SANER 3).

Babylon 10: The Borsippa Inscription of Antiochus I Soter

This sub-project includes an edition of the Borsippa Inscription of Antiochus I Soter (281-261 BC).
Kathryn Stevens contributed the lemmatized edition; Jamie Novotny made minor stylistic changes to the edition and lemmatization.

Babylon 2: The Inscriptions of the Second Dynasty of Isin

This sub-project includes editions of the official inscriptions of the Second Dynasty of Isin (ca. 1157-1026 BC), texts published in Frame, RIMB 2 pp. 5-69.
Grant Frame contributed the transliterations and translations and Alexa Bartelmus updated and lemmatized the editions.

Babylon 3: The Inscriptions of the Second Dynasty of the Sealand

This sub-project includes editions of the official inscriptions of the Second Dynasty of the Sealand (ca. 1025-1005 BC), texts published in Frame, RIMB 2 pp. 70-77.
Grant Frame contributed the transliterations and translations and Alexa Bartelmus updated and lemmatized the editions.

Babylon 4: The Inscriptions of the Bazi Dynasty

This sub-project includes editions of the official inscriptions of the Bazi Dynasty (ca. 1004-985 BC), texts published in Frame, RIMB 2 pp. 78-86.
Grant Frame contributed the transliterations and translations and Alexa Bartelmus updated and lemmatized the editions.

Babylon 5: The Inscriptions of the Elamite Dynasty

This sub-project includes editions of the official inscriptions of the Elamite Dynasty (ca. 984-979 BC), texts published in Frame, RIMB 2 pp. 87-89.
Grant Frame contributed the transliterations and translations and Alexa Bartelmus updated and lemmatized the editions.

Babylon 6: The Inscriptions of the Period of the Uncertain Dynasties

This sub-project includes editions of the official inscriptions of the the Period of the Uncertain Dynasties "Uncertain Dynasties" (978-626 BC), texts published in Frame, RIMB 2 pp. 5-69 and Leichty, RINAP 4.
Grant Frame and Erle Leichty contributed the transliterations and translations and Alexa Bartelmus and Jamie Novotny updated and lemmatized the editions.

Babylon 7: The Inscriptions of the Neo-Babylonian Dynasty

This sub-project presently includes editions of some of the official inscriptions of the Neo-Babylonian Dynasty (625-539 BC), texts of Nabopolassar, Amēl-Marduk, and Neriglissar published by Da Riva. The ‘Babylon 7’ project will also include the inscriptions of Nebuchadnezzar II and Nabonidus.
Rocío Da Riva contributed the transliterations; Jamie Novotny adapted the editions, wrote a few of the content pages, and lemmatized the inscriptions; and Alexa Bartelmus prepared most of the informational pages.

Babylon 8: The Inscriptions of Cyrus II and His Successors

This sub-project presently includes editions of three of Akkadian inscriptions of the Persian ruler Cyrus II (559-530 BC). The ‘Babylon 8’ project will eventually include other Akkadian, Elamite, and Old Persian inscriptions of Cyrus II and his successors.
Alexa Bartelmus and Jamie Novotny adapted the editions from I. Finkel, The Cyrus Cylinder. The King of Persia's Proclamation from Ancient Babylon and H. Schaudig, Die Inschriften Nabonids von Babylon und Kyros' des Großen.

Sources: Sources for Inscriptions of the Rulers of Babylonia

This sub-project presently includes object transliterations of the inscriptions of Nabopolassar, Amēl-Marduk, and Neriglissar. The ‘Sources’ project intends to include the transliterations of all of the objects inscribed with inscriptions from the Second Dynasty of Isin to the Neo-Babylonian Dynasty (1157-539 BC).

Rīm-Anum: The House of Prisoners

Rīm-Anum, king of Uruk (ca. 1741–1739 BC) revolted against Samsuiluna of Babylon, son of Hammurapi, and enjoyed a short-lived independence. The archive edited in this project derives from the house of prisoners (bīt asiri) that kept the prisoners of war. The editions and translations were prepared by Andrea Seri and accompanies her book "The House of Prisoners" (2013).
Buy the book from Harrassowitz.

RINAP: Royal Inscriptions of the Neo-Assyrian Period

Presents fully searchable, annotated editions of the royal inscriptions of Neo-Assyrian kings Tiglath-pileser III (744-727 BC), Shalmaneser V (726-722 BC), Sargon II (721-705 BC), Sennacherib (704-681 BC), and Esarhaddon (680-669 BC).
Directed by Grant Frame at the University of Pennsylvania and funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

RINAP 1: Tiglath-pileser III and Shalmaneser V

The official inscriptions of Tiglath-pileser III (744-727 BC) and Shalmaneser V (726-722 BC), kings of Assyria, edited by Hayim Tadmor and Shigeo Yamada.
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

RINAP 3: Sennacherib

The official inscriptions of Sennacherib (704-681 BC), king of Assyria, edited by A. Kirk Grayson and Jamie Novotny.
Buy Part 1 from Eisenbrauns and/or Part 2 from Eisenbrauns.

RINAP 4: Esarhaddon

The official inscriptions of Esarhaddon, king of Assyria (680-669 BC), edited by Erle Leichty.
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

RINAP 5: Ashurbanipal and Successors

The official inscriptions of the Assyrian kings Ashurbanipal (668–ca. 631 BC), Aššur-etel-ilāni (ca. 631–627/626 BC), and Sîn-šarra-iškun (627/626–612 BC), edited by Jamie Novotny, Grant Frame, and Joshua Jeffers.

RINAP Scores

This sub-project of RINAP Online includes all fifty-five of the score transliterations published by the RINAP Project (2011-14).

RINAP Sources

This sub-project of RINAP Online includes transliterations of the available sources of the editions published by the RINAP Project (2011-15).

SAAo: State Archives of Assyria Online

The online counterpart to the State Archives of Assyria series, released with the kind permission of The Neo-Assyrian Text Corpus Project and its director Professor Simo Parpola.
Associated portal sites include Knowledge and Power and Assyrian Empire Builders.

Knowledge and Power

Presents Neo-Assyrian scholars' letters, queries, and reports to their kings in seventh-century Nineveh and provides resources to support their use in undergraduate teaching.
Directed by Karen Radner at University College London and Eleanor Robson at the University of Cambridge; funded by the UK Higher Education Academy, 2007-10.

SAAo/SAA01: The Correspondence of Sargon II, Part I: Letters from Assyria and the West

The text editions from the book S. Parpola, The Correspondence of Sargon II, Part I: Letters from Assyria and the West (State Archives of Assyria, 1), 1987 (2015 reprint).
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

SAAo/SAA02: Neo-Assyrian Treaties and Loyalty Oaths

The text editions from the book S. Parpola and K. Watanabe, Neo-Assyrian Treaties and Loyalty Oaths (State Archives of Assyria, 2), 1988 (reprint 2014).
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

SAAo/SAA03: Court Poetry and Literary Miscellanea

The text editions from the book A. Livingstone, Court Poetry and Literary Miscellanea (State Archives of Assyria, 3), 1989 (2014 reprint).
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

SAAo/SAA04: Queries to the Sungod: Divination and Politics in Sargonid Assyria

The text editions from the book I. Starr, Queries to the Sungod: Divination and Politics in Sargonid Assyria (State Archives of Assyria, 4), 1990.
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SAAo/SAA05: The Correspondence of Sargon II, Part II: Letters from the Northern and Northeastern Provinces

The text editions from the book G. B. Lanfranchi and S. Parpola, The Correspondence of Sargon II, Part II: Letters from the Northern and Northeastern Provinces (State Archives of Assyria, 5), 1990 (2014 reprint).
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SAAo/SAA06: Legal Transactions of the Royal Court of Nineveh, Part I: Tiglath-Pileser III through Esarhaddon

The text editions from the book T. Kwasman and S. Parpola, Legal Transactions of the Royal Court of Nineveh, Part I: Tiglath-Pileser III through Esarhaddon (State Archives of Assyria, 6), 1991.
Out of print.

SAAo/SAA07: Imperial Administrative Records, Part I: Palace and Temple Administration

The text editions from the book F. M. Fales and J. N. Postgate, Imperial Administrative Records, Part I: Palace and Temple Administration (State Archives of Assyria, 7), 1992 (2014 reprint).
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SAAo/SAA08: Astrological Reports to Assyrian Kings

The text editions from the book H. Hunger, Astrological Reports to Assyrian Kings (State Archives of Assyria, 8), 1992 (2014 reprint).
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SAAo/SAA09: Assyrian Prophecies

The text editions from the book S. Parpola, Assyrian Prophecies (State Archives of Assyria, 9), 1997.
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SAAo/SAA10: Letters from Assyrian and Babylonian Scholars

The text editions from the book S. Parpola, Letters from Assyrian and Babylonian Scholars (State Archives of Assyria, 10), 1993 (2014 reprint).
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SAAo/SAA11: Imperial Administrative Records, Part II: Provincial and Militar Administration

The text editions from the book F. M. Fales and J. N. Postgate, Imperial Administrative Records, Part II: Provincial and Military Administration (State Archives of Assyria, 11), 1995.
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SAAo/SAA12: Grants, Decres and Gifts of the Neo-Assyrian Period

The text editions from the book L. Kataja and R. Whiting, Grants, Decrees and Gifts of the Neo-Assyrian Period (State Archives of Assyria, 12), 1995.
Out of print.

SAAo/SAA13: Letters from Assyrian and Babylonian Priests to Kings Esarhaddon and Assurbanipal

The text editions from the book S. W. Cole and P. Machinist, Letters from Assyrian and Babylonian Priests to Kings Esarhaddon and Assurbanipal (State Archives of Assyria, 13), 1998 (reprint 2014).
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SAAo/SAA14: Legal Transactions of the Royal Court of Nineveh, Part II: Assurbanipal Through Sin-šarru-iškun

The text editions from the book R. Mattila, Legal Transactions of the Royal Court of Nineveh, Part II: Assurbanipal Through Sin-šarru-iškun (State Archives of Assyria, 14), 2002.
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SAAo/SAA15: The Correspondence of Sargon II, Part III: Letters from Babylonia and the Eastern Provinces

The text editions from the book A. Fuchs and S. Parpola, The Correspondence of Sargon II, Part III: Letters from Babylonia and the Eastern Provinces (State Archives of Assyria, 15), 2001.
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SAAo/SAA16: The Political Correspondence of Esarhaddon

The text editions from the book M. Luukko and G. Van Buylaere, The Political Correspondence of Esarhaddon (State Archives of Assyria, 16), 2002.
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SAAo/SAA17: The Neo-Babylonian Correspondence of Sargon and Sennacherib

The text editions from the book M. Dietrich, The Neo-Babylonian Correspondence of Sargon and Sennacherib (State Archives of Assyria, 17), 2003.
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SAAo/SAA18: The Babylonian Correspondence of Esarhaddon and Letters to Assurbanipal and Sin-šarru-iškun from Northern and Central Babylonia

The text editions from the book F. S. Reynolds, The Babylonian Correspondence of Esarhaddon and Letters to Assurbanipal and Sin-šarru-iškun from Northern and Central Babylonia (State Archives of Assyria, 18), 2003.
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SAAo/SAA19: The Correspondence of Tiglath-Pileser III and Sargon II from Calah/Nimrud

The text editions from the book Mikko Luukko, The Correspondence of Tiglath-Pileser III and Sargon II from Calah/Nimrud (State Archives of Assyria, 19), 2013.
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SAAo/SAA20: Assyrian Royal Rituals and Cultic Texts

The text editions from the book Simo Parpola, Assyrian Royal Rituals and Cultic Texts (State Archives of Assyria, 20), 2017.
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SAAo/SAAS2: SAAo/Assyrian Eponym List

The text editions and composite translation from the book A. Millard, The Eponyms of the Assyrian Empire, 910-612 BC (State Archives of Assyria Studies 2), 1994 (2014 reprint).
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seal/AkkLove: seal/Akkadian Love Literature

AkkLove presents all early Akkadian literary texts related to love and sex known to date. The project is based on Wasserman, Akkadian Love Literature of the Third and Second Millennium BCE ( LAOS 4), Harrassowitz, 2016, where commentary to the texts and an introduction to the corpus are found.

Suhu: The Inscriptions of Suhu online

This project presents annotated editions of the officially commissioned texts of the extant, first-millennium-BC inscriptions of the rulers of Suhu, texts published in Frame, RIMB 2 pp. 275-331. The open-access transliterations and translations were made available through the kind permission of Grant Frame and with funding provided by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.
Suhu online is based at LMU Munich (Historisches Seminar, Alte Geschichte) and is managed by Jamie Novotny and Karen Radner. Alexa Bartelmus and Grant Frame are the primary content contributors.

Xcat: The X Catalogue

Provides a global registry of cuneiform manuscripts, supplementary to CDLI.
Managed by Eleanor Robson at the University of Cambridge.