Sunday, March 31, 2019

Open Access Journal: Archaeologia Bulgarica

Archaeologia Bulgarica
 ISSN: 1310-9537
Archaeologia Bulgarica
Archaeologia Bulgarica is a scientific journal that has been published since 1997 without any interruption. It is covered by SCOPUS and ERIH PLUS. Editorial board: Lyudmil VAGALINSKI PhD (editor-in-chief; Sofia, Bulgaria), LFVagalinski@gmail.comLVagalin@techno-link.com; Prof. László BARTOSIEWICZ PhD DSc (Budapest, Hungary & Stockholm, Sweden) Laszlo.Bart@ed.ac.ukh10459bar@helka.iif.hubartwicz@yahoo.com; Prof. Florin CURTA PhD (Gainesville, Florida, USA) fcurta@history.ufl.edu; Prof. Falko DAIM PhD (Mainz, Germany) daim@rgzm.de; Prof. Haskel GREENFIELD PhD (Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada) Greenf@cc.umanitoba.caHaskel.Greenfield@ad.umanitoba.ca; Jean-Luc GUADELLI PhD (Bordeaux, France) jeanluc.guadelli@wanadoo.frjl.guadelli@pacea.u-bordeaux1.fr; Prof. Boris MAGOMEDOV DSc (Kyiv, Ukraine) bmagomedov@rambler.ru; Prof. Vincent MEGAW DLitt (Adelaide, Australia) vincent.megaw@flinders.edu.au; Prof. Aristotle MENTZOS PhD (Thessaloniki, Greece) Mentzos@hist.auth.gr; Prof. Marcel OTTE PhD (Liege, Belgium) Marcel.Otte@ulg.ac.beprehist@ulg.ac.be; Prof. Thilo REHREN PhD (Doha, Qatar & London, UK) th.rehren@ucl.ac.uk; Prof. Mustafa SAYAR (Istanbul, Turkey), mhsayar@gmail.com; Nicolay SHARANKOV MA (Sofia, Bulgaria) nsharankov@yahoo.com; Rastko VASIĆ PhD (Belgrade, Serbia) rvasic@beotel.rs; Tivadar VIDA PhD (Budapest, Hungary) vida.tivadar@btk.mta.hu; Prof. Jak YAKAR (Tel Aviv, Israel) yakar@post.tau.ac.iljakyakar@gmail.com.

See AWOL's full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies

Coming Soon: Brown Judaic Studies (BJS) Online

From Michael L Satlow's Then and Now
Over the past few years I have served as Managing Editor of Brown Judaic Studies (BJS), a scholarly monograph series.  I am very excited to announce that after a few attempts, we have succeeded in obtaining a grant from the Mellon Foundation, through the Humanities Open Book Program run by the National Endowment for the Humanities, to digitize and make freely available over the internet electronic copies (in different formats, of about fifty titles from our back list.  The press release is here.

BJS was established about forty years ago as an outlet for (mostly) high-quality, usually specialized, scholarly monographs.  Recently we began also to publish collections of scholarly papers, usually emerging from a conference or gathered as part of a Festschrift (a volume honoring an academic colleague).  Although we publish only a few volumes each year, over the years we have accumulated a significant backlist and many of our older volumes remain foundational in several different areas within Judaic studies.  We have also begun to develop projects that begin as invited lectured by distinguished scholars at Brown University (for our first publication as part of this initiative, see this book by Hasia Diner).

As a publishing outlet, BJS is unusual.  It is administered by the faculty of the Program in Judaic Studies at Brown University, who serve (without compensation) as acquisitions editors who can also help with the specialized contents of the volumes.  Once a volume is accepted, we outsource the copyediting and typesetting and then send then completed project to our partner, SBL Press, for printing, marketing, and distribution.  Since we maintain a lean budget, we are able to price our volumes relatively affordably, despite their specialized appeal.

We frequently receive requests, many from underfunded research libraries abroad, for free copies of our books, any of which had small print runs and are now out of print.  The primary goal of the Humanities Open Book Program is to begin to make these titles widely available.  Authors will have the option of making minor corrections or revisions to their volumes, and some will be invited to add retrospective essays.  It is our hope that opening access to these important and refreshed volumes will lower the barriers to access and allow their ideas to circulate widely.

At the same time, we also have other larger goals for this initiative:
  • We have partnered with the Association for Jewish Studies to make our digital titles accessible via their site as well.  Our mutual hope is that these titles will help to create an ecosystem that promotes and expands open access Judaica scholarship.
  • Is open access financial sustainable?  We hope to learn through this initiative whether we can feasibly extend our ability to incorporate open access routinely into the life-cycle of our publications.  Could we, for example, allow all of our titles to go to open access after some period of time (five years?) in print?
  • The world of scholarly publishing has long been in turmoil.  We hope that this grant will raise awareness of a model of publication that allows for publication of high-quality, peer-reviewed works outside of the structure of university presses, which might in turn productively further the conversation.
Stay tuned!

Crossing Experiences in Digital Epigraphy: From Practice to Discipline

Crossing Experiences in Digital Epigraphy: From Practice to Discipline 
De Santis, Annamaria / Rossi, Irene

ISBN: 978-3-11-060720
 


Aims and Scope

Although a relevant number of projects digitizing inscriptions are under development or have been recently accomplished, Digital Epigraphy is not yet considered to be a proper discipline and there are still no regular occasions to meet and discuss. By collecting contributions on nineteen projects – very diversified for geographic and chronological context, for script and language, and for typology of digital output – this volume intends to point out the methodological issues which are specific to the application of information technologies to epigraphy. 
The first part of the volume is focused on data modelling and encoding, which are conditioned by the specific features of different scripts and languages, and deeply influence the possibility to perform searches on texts and the approach to the lexicographic study of such under-resourced languages. The second part of the volume is dedicated to the initiatives aimed at fostering aggregation, dissemination and the reuse of epigraphic materials, and to discuss issues of interoperability. 
The common theme of the volume is the relationship between the compliance with the theoretic tools and the methodologies developed by each different tradition of studies, and, on the other side, the necessity of adopting a common framework in order to produce commensurable and shareable results. The final question is whether the computational approach is changing the way epigraphy is studied, to the extent of renovating the discipline on the basis of new, unexplored questions.

Saturday, March 30, 2019

Mummy Label Database (MLD)

Mummy Label Database (MLD)













The Mummy Label Database (MLD) is a joint project of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago, the Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Barcelona), and the Universidad Complutense (Madrid). It was established in 2007, when Sofía Torallas Tovar (University of Chicago) and François Gaudard (University of Chicago) decided to join efforts to study mummy labels, a source material that requires linguistic expertise in both Greek and Demotic, among other things. They were soon joined by Raquel Martín Hernández (Universidad Complutense) and Klaas A. Worp (Leiden University), who has extensive experience in the edition of Greek mummy labels. The team grew, adding Alberto Nodar (Universitat Pompeu Fabra), with remarkable skills in papyrology-related databases, and Amalia Zomeño (CCHS-CSIC, Madrid), who specializes in the study of the ancient Arabic civilization, providing a comparative vision into a later period. Additional members also joined the team: María Jesús Albarrán (CCHS-CSIC, Madrid), Irene Pajón (Universidad de Sevilla), Alba de Frutos García (CCHS-CSIC, Madrid), Marina Escolano Poveda (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore), and Sergio Carro Martín (Universitat Pompeu Fabra), who is the team’s research assistant since 2009.

Sphragis: A Bibliography for Aegean Glyptic

Sphragis: A Bibliography for Aegean Glyptic

Bibliography I: from the late 4th c. BCE (Theophrastos) to 1990 CE (CMS Beiheft 4, A Bibliography for Aegean Glyptic in the Bronze Age, by John G. Younger. Berlin: Gebr. Mann Verlag 1991).
Bibliography II: from 1990 CE - present
Bibliography III. Volumes of the CMS
 

Friday, March 29, 2019

LSJLogeion

LSJLogeion
This is the heavily edited local Chicago version of the Perseus LSJ; all Greek converted to Unicode; many entries split or merged. If using these files, please credit Perseus Tufts and Helma Dik/Logeion, and please report issues.

LSJ Lexicon (CEX, Markdown)

LSJ Lexicon (CEX, Markdown)
This repository holds an edition of the LSJ Lexicon formatted as a CEX file, with the lexicon's entries formatted lightly in Markdown.
The original digitization of the public domain text of the LSJ is courtesy of the Perseus Digital Library: Text provided by Perseus Digital Library, with funding from The National Endowment for the Humanities. Original version available for viewing and download at http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/.
The transformation of the Perseus text to an XML edition with composed Unicode was done by Giuseppe Celano. The files here are a further transformation of Celano's work.
License CC 3.0 BY-NC-SA.

Contents

  • lsj.cex A Cite Collection of the entries in the LSJ, with accompanying documentation of a discoverable text property extension identifying the entry property as a having a primtive type String and an extended type Markdown. URNs for the LSJ collection are, e.g. urn:cts:hmt:lsj.markdown:n51.
  • lsj.index A searchable index as tabulated lines, with # as the field delimiter. The fields are:
    1. The ID (object-selector) of an entry
    2. The entry's key (lemma) in Unicode, normalized to remove diacritical marks
    3. The entry's key (lemma) in Beta Code, normalized to remove diacritical marks
    4. A listing of all Greek words in the entry, in Beta Code without accents
  • files A directory of individual CEX fragments for each alphabetic division of the LSJ.

Corrections

Please submit corrections as issues in GitHub or (ideally) in the form of pull-requests.

Lewis & Short Latin Dictionary (CEX, Markdown)

Lewis & Short Latin Dictionary (CEX, Markdown)
This repository holds an edition of the Lewis & Short Latin Dictionary formatted as a CEX file, with the lexicon's entries formatted lightly in Markdown.
The original digitization of the public domain text of the LSJ is courtesy of the Perseus Digital Library: Text provided by Perseus Digital Library, with funding from The National Endowment for the Humanities. Original version available for viewing and download at http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/.
License CC 3.0 BY-NC-SA.

Contents

  • ls.cex A Cite Collection of the entries in the dictionaryj, with accompanying documentation of a discoverable text property extension identifying the entry property as a having a primtive type String and an extended type Markdown. URNs for the LSJ collection are, e.g. urn:cts:hmt:lsj.markdown:n51.
  • lsj.index A searchable index as tabulated lines, with # as the field delimiter. The fields are:
    1. The ID (object-selector) of an entry
    2. The lemma

Corrections

Please submit corrections as issues in GitHub or (ideally) in the form of pull-requests.

Collaborative Database of Dateable Greek Bookhands (CDDGB)

Collaborative Database of Dateable Greek Bookhands (CDDGB)
The Collaborative Database of Dateable Greek Bookhands (CDDGB) is a catalogue of Greek manuscripts written in a literary script which, apart from a few exceptions, can be dated on the basis of some objective criterion, such as the presence of a document on the reverse side which contains a date, or a dateable archaeological context associated with the manuscript. These manuscripts are important because they provide papyrologists and paleographers with an evidential base for tracing the evolution of Greek handwriting and for dating other manuscripts which lack objective criteria. Presently the database includes manuscripts from the first nine centuries of the Common Era (0–899 CE). It will ultimately be expanded to include manuscripts dated to earlier centuries. Manuscripts written in minuscule script are excluded. Though influenced by PapPal, the CDDGB differs from it in that it focuses on dateable bookhands.
As its name implies, the CDDGB intends to be a collaborative project, eliciting on-going feedback from the scholarly community. It is a work in progress. Under the “Collaborate” tab, anyone can submit new dateable manuscripts for consideration or offer suggested edits for the data currently provided in the catalogue. We hope that interested members of the academic community will help to improve the various entries.
The CDDGB is not intended to contain the extensive bibliographical information associated with the various manuscripts in the database, nor have we consulted all of the secondary literature for each item. Users should be aware that in certain cases the information which is presented in the CDDGB is a matter of debate. We are glad to be apprised of any needed updates. Users are also encouraged to consult the Leuven Database of Ancient Books and, when its results are published, the authoritative project, “Greek Literary Hands of the Roman Period,” a collaboration between the University of Oxford and the University of Cassino. This latter project is much anticipated, as it will present the results of an exhaustive survey of literary and sub-literary papyri from the Roman period by paleographical experts.
The CDDGB was created and is maintained by Grant Edwards, a PhD student at the University of Birmingham.

Thursday, March 28, 2019

Sembase: a database project for the study of Semitic roots

 [First posted in AWOL 2 March 2013, updated 28 March 2019]

Sembase: a database project for the study of Semitic roots
http://www.sembase.org/sembase2.jpg
In today's world, even people in the same general discipline, but specialized in different areas, may not understand each other's work. Nonlinguists working on Middle East topics, or linguists devoting their time to the study of other language families, may not have been exposed to the Semitic family of languages (or Semitic subfamily of Afro-Asiatic). The Semitic languages all share certain distinctive characteristics. This project is especially dependent on one of them, the consonantal root system. This very brief introduction is intended to enable the nonspecialist to more fully understand Sembase...
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Open Access Journal: Heritage Science

Heritage Science
ISSN: 2050-7445
Heritage Science Cover Image
Heritage Science is an open access journal publishing original peer-reviewed research covering:
  • Understanding of the manufacturing processes, provenances, and environmental contexts of material types, objects, and buildings, of cultural significance including their historical significance.
  • Understanding and prediction of physico-chemical and biological degradation processes of cultural artefacts, including climate change, and predictive heritage studies.
  • Development and application of analytical and imaging methods or equipments for non-invasive, non-destructive or portable analysis of artwork and objects of cultural significance to identify component materials, degradation products and deterioration markers.
  • Development and application of invasive and destructive methods for understanding the provenance of objects of cultural significance.
  • Development and critical assessment of treatment materials and methods for artwork and objects of cultural significance.
  • Development and application of statistical methods and algorithms for data analysis to further understanding of culturally significant objects.
  • Publication of reference and corpus datasets as supplementary information to the statistical and analytical studies above.
  • Description of novel technologies that can assist in the understanding of cultural heritage.
Where research reflects current usage of and advances in analytical techniques, it is anticipated that authors will place their work in the context of cultural and conservation studies. The conclusions should clarify the importance of the findings to heritage science, to be clear that the advance is not merely to record a number of measurements.
Recent articles :
  1. Content type: Research article

    In this paper, a sword is investigated from a collection of archaeological iron swords displayed in the Egyptian Museum from the civilization centered on Ballana and Qustul in Egyptian Nubia (380–600 A.D.). A ...
    Authors: Yussri Salem, Omid Oudbashi and Doaa Eid
    Citation: Heritage Science 2019 7:19
    Published on:
  2. Content type: Research article

    Lead used to be a common material for setting seal to historical documents. Lead seals formed parts of historical documents as a guarantee of their legal validity. Disinfectants are commonly used during the re...
    Authors: Sarka Msallamova, Milan Kouril, Kristyna Charllote Strachotova, Jan Stoulil, Kateryna Popova and Pavla Dvorakova
    Citation: Heritage Science 2019 7:18
    Published on:
  3. Content type: Research article

    In conservation science, the identification of painting materials is fundamental for the study of artists’ palettes, for dating and for understanding on-going degradation phenomena. For these purposes, the stu...
    Authors: Alessia Artesani, Marta Ghirardello, Sara Mosca, Austin Nevin, Gianluca Valentini and Daniela Comelli
    Citation: Heritage Science 2019 7:17
    Published on:
  4. Content type: Review

    This review addresses the use of computational fluid dynamics for the interpretation and preservation of heritage. Fluid dynamic simulations in the heritage field focus mostly on slow air movement in indoor sp...
    Authors: Josep Grau-Bové, Luca Mazzei, Matija Strlic and May Cassar
    Citation: Heritage Science 2019 7:16
    Published on:
  5. Content type: Research article

    Liquid chromatography with UV–Vis and mass spectrometric detection (LC–DAD–MS) was applied to the identification of dyes and biological sources in samples from nineteenth to twentieth century ethnographic text...
    Authors: Irina Petroviciu, Iulia Teodorescu, Florin Albu, Marian Virgolici, Eugenia Nagoda and Andrei Medvedovici
    Citation: Heritage Science 2019 7:15
    Published on:
  6. Content type: Research article

    Quantitation of paint powders of ancient wall paintings is often hindered by the calcite contamination during samples withdrawal. To overcome this problem, a new approach was explored based on the mechanical p...
    Authors: Monica Gelzo, Gaetano Corso, Rita Pecce, Ottavia Arcari, Ciro Piccioli, Antonio Dello Russo and Paolo Arcari
    Citation: Heritage Science 2019 7:12
    Published on:
  7. Content type: Research article

    This paper proposes a new approach to collection surveying based on epidemiology, the discipline that describes and explains disease patterns in populations. In epidemiology the focus of attention lies not onl...
    Authors: Cristina Duran-Casablancas, Josep Grau-Bové, Tom Fearn and Matija Strlič
    Citation: Heritage Science 2019 7:11
    Published on:
  8. Content type: Review

    Wear and tear is the outcome of degradation most frequently reported in assessments of archival and library collections. It is also problematic to study in controlled experiments, due to the difficulty in repr...
    Authors: Cristina Duran-Casablancas, Josep Grau-Bové and Matija Strlič
    Citation: Heritage Science 2019 7:10
    Published on:
  9. Content type: Research article

    Ukiyo-e Japanese woodblock prints were mass-produced in the Edo Period and early impressions of a given print are generally of higher quality and more sought after by connoisseurs than late impressions. The pr...
    Authors: Capucine F. Korenberg, Lucia Pereira-Pardo, Peter J. McElhinney and Joanne Dyer
    Citation: Heritage Science 2019 7:9
    Published on:
  10. Content type: Research article

    Modern art materials introduced since the end of XIX century include a large number of formulations of synthetic polymers and pigments, whose degradation processes and best preservation conditions are a major ...
    Authors: Jacopo La Nasa, Greta Biale, Francesca Sabatini, Ilaria Degano, Maria Perla Colombini and Francesca Modugno
    Citation: Heritage Science 2019 7:8
    Published on:
  11. Content type: Research article

    This paper presents the results of a study of pigment-binder systems painted on parchment, both in the form of reference samples prepared in the laboratory, and of medieval and Renaissance illuminated manuscri...
    Authors: Luca Nodari and Paola Ricciardi
    Citation: Heritage Science 2019 7:7
    Published on:
  12. Content type: Research article

    This research presents the damage mechanism of a historical masonry architecture induced by differential settlement based on 3D FE analysis. The purpose of the study was to investigate the behavior fully-satur...
    Authors: Sayed Hemeda
    Citation: Heritage Science 2019 7:6
    Published on:
  13. Content type: Research article

    To understand the effects of an acidic environment on the internal structure of sandstone from the Yungang Grottoes, Datong, China, the physicochemical properties of fresh and weathered sandstone samples and t...
    Authors: Hong Geng, Shijie Zhang, Jianhui Zhi, Runping Zhang, Jianguang Ren and Chul-Un Ro
    Citation: Heritage Science 2019 7:4
    Published on:
  14. Content type: Research article

    Mosaics, one of the most important decorative artworks in the Roman culture, were usually elaborated with a set of tesserae joined with lime or others binders to form geometric or figurative decorations. The i...
    Authors: Iker Marcaida, Maite Maguregui, Héctor Morillas, Nagore Prieto-Taboada, Marco Veneranda, Silvia Fdez-Ortiz de Vallejuelo, Alberta Martellone, Bruno De Nigris, Massimo Osanna and Juan Manuel Madariaga
    Citation: Heritage Science 2019 7:3
    Published on:

See AWOL's full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies