Monday, April 20, 2020

Open Access Monograph Series: Papers on Archaeology of the Leiden Museum of Antiquities (PALMA)

Papers on Archaeology of the Leiden Museum of Antiquities (PALMA)






Papers on Archaeology of the Leiden Museum of Antiquities (PALMA) is a series of monographs by the National Museum of Antiquities in Leiden (Netherlands).
The museum was founded in 1818 and houses important collections of Egyptian, Near Eastern, Classical, and Dutch archaeology. The Leiden Museum has always been active in the field of research, including excavations, and is also known for its special exhibitions, some of which travel around the world. PALMA is designed to reflect all these activities.

Perspectives on Lived Religion

Practices - Transmission - Landscape


Edited by Nico Staring, Huw Twiston Davies and Lara Weiss | 2019

Religion in the ancient world, and ancient Egyptian religion in particular, is often perceived as static, hierarchically organised, and centred on priests, tombs, and temples. Engagement with archaeological and textual evidence dispels these beguiling if…



The naos of Amasis

A monument for the reawakening of Osiris


Marco Zecchi | 2019

The naos AM 107 of the Museum of Antiquities in Leiden was made by order of king Amasis in the 6th century BC, a period that saw an intense production of monolithic shrines. Despite its…



‘The most prominent Dutchman in Egypt’

Jan Herman Insinger and the Egyptian collection in Leiden


Maarten J. Raven | 2018

Jan Herman Insinger was a well-known character in the history of Egyptology, mainly because his name has been linked forever with a famous demotic wisdom papyrus now in Leiden. Although he is mentioned by many…



Exorcism, illness and demons in an ancient Near Eastern context

The Egyptian magical Papyrus Leiden I 343 + 345


Susanne Beck | 2018

Papyrus Leiden I 343 + 345 is one of the most extraordinary manuscripts providing a deeper insight into magic and medicine in Ancient Egypt. The main part of the papyrus deals with the ancient Near…



The Coffins of the Priests of Amun

Egyptian coffins from the 21st Dynasty in the collection of the National Museum of Antiquities in Leiden


Edited by Lara Weiss | 2017

Ancient Egyptian coffins provided a shell to protect the deceased both magically and physically. They guaranteed an important requirement for eternal life: an intact body. Not everybody could afford richly decorated wooden coffins. As commodities,…



Engraved Gems

From antiquity to the present


Edited by Ben van den Bercken & Vivian Baan | 2017

Many are no larger than a fingertip. They are engraved with symbols, magic spells and images of gods, animals and emperors. These stones were used for various purposes. The earliest ones served as seals for…



Fragmenting the Chieftain

A practice-based study of Early Iron Age Hallstatt C elite burials in the Low Countries


Sasja van der Vaart-Verschoof | 2017

There is a cluster of Early Iron Age (800–500 BC) elite burials in the Low Countries in which bronze vessels, weaponry, horse-gear and wagons were interred as grave goods. Mostly imports from Central Europe, these…





Fragmenting the Chieftain – Catalogue

Late Bronze and Early Iron Age elite burials in the Low Countries


Sasja van der Vaart-Verschoof | 2017

There is a cluster of Early Iron Age (800–500 BC) elite burials in the Low Countries in which bronze vessels, weaponry, horse-gear and wagons were interred as grave goods. Mostly imports from Central Europe, these…



The Canino Connections

The history and restoration of ancient Greek vases from the excavations of Lucien Bonaparte, Prince of Canino (1775-1840)


Edited by Ruurd Binnert Halbertsma | 2017

Starting in the year 1828, Lucien Bonaparte, Prince of Canino, unearthed more than 2000 Greek vases on his estate near the ancient Etruscan town of Vulci. The vases were restored and found their way to…



Nineveh, the Great City

Symbol of Beauty and Power


Edited by Lucas P. Petit, & Daniele Morandi Bonacossi | 2017

‘Well, as for Nineveh, skipper, it was wiped out long ago. There’s not a trace of it left, and one can’t even guess where it was’ (Lucian, 2nd century AD). Nineveh, the once-flourishing capital of…




  And see AWOL's Alphabetical List of Open Access Monograph Series in Ancient Studies

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