Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Open Access Journal: Internet Archaeology

[First posted in AWOL 21 March 2012. Updated 22 May 2018]

Internet Archaeology 
ISSN: 1363-5387
http://intarch.ac.uk/logo/ia-logo.gif
Internet Archaeology has been publishing on the web since 1996 and is the premier e-journal for archaeology. Internet Archaeology is an open access, independent, not-for-profit journal. It publishes quality academic content and explores the potential of electronic publication through the inclusion of video, audio, searchable data sets, full-colour images, visualisations, animations and interactive mapping. Internet Archaeology is international in scope, a true journal without borders, and all content is peer-reviewed. Internet Archaeology is hosted by the Department of Archaeology at the University of York and digitally archived by the Archaeology Data Service.

Issue 50. Big Data on the Roman Table: new approaches to tablewares in the Roman world

Edited by Penelope Allison, Martin Pitts and Sarah Colley


Theme proposal received: October 2016; Accepted: September 2017; Published: May 2018

Section 1

An Introduction to a Research Network: the rationale and the approaches
Penelope Allison

Section 2. Analysing vessel use

Form Follows Function. A new approach to determining vessel function
Vincent van der Veen

Domestic Patterns of Tableware Consumption in Roman Celtiberia
Jesús Bermejo Tirado

Calculating Liquid Capacity to Understand what could have been Consumed from 'Drinking' Vessels
William Baddiley

The Uses of South Gaulish Terra Sigillata on the Roman Table. A study of nomenclature and vessel function
Geoffrey Dannell

Section 3. Table settings and consumption practices

Pottery Function, Dining and Funerary Assemblages. A comparative study from northern Gaul
Alice Dananai and Xavier Deru

From Table to Grave: Examining Table Settings in Roman Britain from Funerary Evidence
Edward Biddulph

A Terra Sigillata Revolution? Terra sigillata consumption in first-century AD Roman Mediterranean Gaul
Benjamin P. Luley

From the Spreadsheet to the Table? Using 'spot-dating' level pottery records from Roman London to explore functional trends among open vessel forms
Michael Marshall and Fiona Seeley

Eating In and Dining Out in Roman Leicester: Exploring pottery consumption patterns across the town and its suburbs
Nicholas J. Cooper, Elizabeth Johnson and Martin J. Sterry

Section 4. New techniques for collation, analysis and visualisation

Exploring Automated Pottery Identification [Arch-I-Scan]
Ivan Tyukin, Konstantin Sofeikov, Jeremy Levesley, Alexander N. Gorban, Penelope Allison and Nicholas J. Cooper

Measuring Usewear on Black Gloss Pottery from Rome through 3D Surface Analysis
Laura M. Banducci, Rachel Opitz and Marcello Mogetta

Building an Ontology of Tablewares using 'Legacy Data'
Daniël van Helden, Yi Hong and Penelope Allison

Classifying and Visualising Roman Pottery using Computer-scanned Typologies
Jacqueline Christmas and Martin Pitts

Multivariate and Spatial Visualisation of Archaeological Assemblages
Martin Sterry

Section 5. Getting pots to the table: broader perspectives

Was there a Difference between Roman 'Civil' and 'Military' Samian (terra sigillata) Market Supply? Finding answers with statistical distribution analysis methods
Allard Mees

Early Imperial Tableware in Roman Asia Minor: a perspective on the diachronic patterns and morphological developments
Rinse Willet

How were Imitations of Samian Formed?
Tino Leleković

Section 6. Discussion of this network

Big Data Analyses of Roman Tableware: information standards, digital technologies and research collaboration
Sarah Colley and Jane Evans

The Echo of Past Choices: The Roman dining table under twenty-first century scrutiny
Steven Willis

Appendices

Appendix A: Roman Tablewares: some notes on definitions and terminology by Penelope Allison and Martin Pitts
Appendix B: Glossary and Abbreviations: 1) Fabrics, forms and their abbreviations 2)Other technical terms and abbreviations
Appendix C: 'Big Data on the Roman Table' Workshops
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