Monday, May 4, 2015

Open Access Serial: AIO Papers (Attic Inscriptions Online)

AIO Papers (Attic Inscriptions Online)
As this is the inaugural publication of AIO Papers, readers may welcome a word of explanation as to the purpose of the series. The primary objective of Attic Inscriptions Online is to make available English translations of Attic inscriptions, based on the most accurate and up-to-date Greek texts. The authoritative publications of the Greek texts are Inscriptiones Graecae vol. I (before 403 BC) and vol. II (403 BC - AD 267), new editions of which appear at infrequent intervals. When an inscription is included in a recently published volume of IG, such as the third edition of IG II (IG II3), the first fascicules of which appeared in 2012, identifying “the most accurate and up-to-date” Greek text can be quite straightforward. In other cases, however, there can more of an issue. It can often be addressed by including one or more references to the review of epigraphical scholarship which is published every year in the Supplementum Epigraphicum Graecum (SEG). However, a simple reference to IG, SEG, or occasionally to another publication, is not always sufficient. SEG, for example, records textual proposals with a degree of indiscrimination which may mislead the inexperienced user. In the process of reviewing the textual literature while preparing a translation for AIO translators may see potential for textual improvements which require explanation and justification. The first purpose of AIO Papers, therefore, is to supply a forum in which the texts underlying the translations published in AIO may be clarified.

Second, it is part of AIO’s purpose to communicate Attic inscriptions to students and researchers who may lack the background knowledge, of the languages, culture and institutions of the Greek world in general, and of Athens and Attica in particular, that is needed to understand a translated inscription in its raw state. AIO Papers will publish essays intended to equip the user of AIO with such background knowledge. AIO Papers no. 4, to appear later in 2014, will be the first of this type: a companion to the translations of the inscribed Athenian laws and decrees of 352/1-322/1 BC, texts of which were published in IG II3 1, fascicule 2.

AIO Papers will also publish other papers consistent with the objectives of AIO.
This includes translations of important articles written by scholars in languages other than English but which, in the editor’s opinion, deserve a wider circulation among an Anglophone readership. AIO Papers no. 2 and 3, translations of two papers originally published in Italian by Enrica Culasso Gastaldi, fall into this category.
[From the Preface to AIO Papers 1]

AIO Papers 7

S. D. Lambert with a contribution by J. D. Morgan - The Last Erechtheion Building Accounts

This paper presents up-to-date texts, informed by relevant work published since 2000, of the two extant sets of fragments of the building accounts of the Erechtheion in Ionic script as a basis for translations of these accounts published simultaneously on AIO. It reviews the date of these accounts, and presents a fresh argument by John Morgan to the effect that, if certain assumptions are made, no. 2 (IG I3 477) is datable to 405/4 BC. That would make it probably the latest extant account. Morgan also finds in this fragment a supporting argument for the position initially aired in AIO Papers 5, p. 3, that the Council's year and the archon's year were not made systematically coterminous in 407 BC, as had previously been thought, but continued to be out of step, probably until ca. 403 BC.

AIO Papers 6

S. D. Lambert - The Inscribed Version of the Decree Honouring Lykourgos of Boutadai (IG II2 457 and 3207)

This paper reviews the relationship between IG II2 457, the upper part of an Athenian decree of 307/6 BC honouring posthumously the orator Lykourgos of Boutadai, and IG II2 3207, the lower part of a stele inscribed with crowns commemorating decrees honouring Lykourgos passed in his lifetime. It finds that 3207 either belonged to the same stele as 457, as the great epigraphist Adolf Wilhlem proposed, or to a separate, but associated stele. In section 2 it investigates the decrees commemorated on 3207, locating them in the context of Lykourgos’ career, his rivalry with Demades and his relations with other politicians of the period.

AIO Papers 5

S. D. Lambert - Accounts of Payments from the Treasury of Athena in 410-407? BC (IG I3 375 and 377)

This paper treats the accounts of payments from the treasury of Athena in 410-407? BC which are inscribed on the front and back of the so-called Choiseul marble, in the Louvre in Paris (IG I3 375 and 377). It presents a fresh text of the difficult reverse face of the inscription (377), which prints only those readings on which the three rival texts currently in circulation are in agreement, and discusses the date. It is designed to support the translations of IG I3 375 and 377 published on AIO and includes an annotated table of the payments listed in these accounts.

AIO Papers 4

S. D. Lambert - Inscribed Athenian Decrees of 229/8-198/7 BC (IG II3 1, 1135-1255)

After exploring features of the history and methodology of Attic epigraphy, this paper surveys the corpus of 121 Athenian decrees of 229/8-198/7 BC recently published as IG II3 1, 1135-1255 (sections I-II of IG II3 1 fascicule 5). It reviews the decrees by category, discussing some historical aspects and proposing some improvements to the texts. It is designed to be read with the translations of these inscriptions published on AIO.

AIO Papers 1

S. D. Lambert - Notes on Inscriptions of the Marathonian Tetrapolis

This paper accompanies the publication on AIO of the inscriptions of the Marathonian Tetrapolis and is designed primarily to clarify the texts on which the translations are based. It reviews scholarship on the Tetrapolis’ sacrificial calendar (iv BC), published since my new edition, ZPE 130 (2000), 43-70, and makes some fresh observations. It also reviews the other inscriptions attributable to the Tetrapolis, IG I3 255, IG II2 2933, IG II2 1243, and an unpublished inscription.

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