Thursday, August 2, 2018

The British Institute for the Study of Iraq Books Online

[First posted in AWOL 9 April 2013, updated 2 August 2018 (new URLs)]


The British Institute for the Study of Iraq Books Online
All of BISI's books are available for free download from these pages.

The Nimrud Wine Lists

The Nimrud Wine Lists
Author: J.V. Kinnier Wilson
Volume: I
1972
Format: Hardback xv, 167p ; 29cm.
ISBN: ISBN-13: 978-0-903472-00-5. ISBN-10: 0-903472-00-7
Price: £9.95

The Governor’s Palace Archive

The Governor’s Palace Archive
Author: J.N. Postgate
Volume: II
1973
Format: 283 pp., 98 plates of cuneiform and photos, hardback
ISBN: ISBN-13: 978-0-903472-01-2. ISBN-10: 0-903472-01-5
Price: £9.95

The Tablets from Fort Shalmaneser

Front cover of CTN 3
Author: S. Dalley & J.N. Postgate
Volume: III
1984
Format: xii + 289 pp, 40 plates, hardback
ISBN: ISBN-13: 978-0-903472-08-2. ISBN-10: 0-903472-08-2
Price: £30
Notes: Out of print.
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The Tablets from Fort Shalmaneser

Literary Texts from the Temple of Nabû

Front cover of CTN 4
Author: D.J. Wiseman & J.A. Black
Volume: IV
1996
Format: x + 62 pp., 157 plates, hardback
ISBN: 9780903472159
Price: £24.95
Notes:
The library of Nimrud, probably established in 798 BC, was a prestigious royal foundation whose scribes had contacts all over the East, particularly with Nineveh. The 259 cuneiform tablets and fragments which constituted the library mainly described magical and medical rituals, prayers and instructions for training scribes. All the epigraphic finds from Sir Max Mallowan's excavations of 1955-7 are described in this volume, with additional material from the Iraq Archaeological Service's excavations of 1985.
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Literary Texts from the Temple of Nabû


The Nimrud Letters 1952

Front cover of CTN 5
Author: H.W.F. Saggs
Volume: V
2001
Format: xii + 307 pp., 64 plates, hardback
ISBN: ISBN-13: 978-0-903472-20-3; ISBN-10: 0-903472-20-1
Price: £40.00
Notes: In 1952 in one wing of the North-West Palace at Nimrud, ancient Kalhu, Max Mallowan excavated an archive room containing royal correspondence from the reigns of Tiglath-pileser III and Sargon II of Assyria. Subjects include Assyrian military activity in Babylonia and on the northern frontier, royal building projects, events on the Phoenician seaboard, and relations with King Midas of Phrygia. Some texts were published in Iraq between 1955 and 1974; the majority have remained unpublished until now. Two hundred and forty-three texts are published here; most are in New Assyrian script and the remainder in New Babylonian. Chapters divide the tablets into the geographical areas they are concerned with. The texts are presented with transliterations, translation and notes. Plates at the end of the book give facsimiles of the tablets.
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The Nimrud Letters 1952
 
  • Ivories from Nimrud

    Equestrian Bridle-Harness Ornaments: Catalogue & Plates

    Front cover of IN 1/2
    Author: J.J. Orchard
    Volume: I/2
    1967
    Format: x+48 pp., 46 pls., hardback
    Price: £9.95

    Ivories in the Assyrian Style

    Front cover of IN 2
    Author: M.E.L. Mallowan & L.G. Davies
    Volume: II
    1970
    Format: v + 60 pp., 46 pl., hardback
    Notes: Out of print.
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    Ivories in the Assyrian Style

    Furniture from SW 7, Fort Shalmaneser

    Front cover of IN 3
    Author: M.E.L. Mallowan & G. Herrmann
    Volume: III
    1974
    Format: 120 pp., 111 pls., hardback
    ISBN: 0-903472-02-3
    Price: £9.95

    Ivories from Room SW 37, Fort Shalmaneser, part I

    Front cover of IN 4/1
    Author: G. Herrmann
    Volume: IV/1
    1986
    Format: 276 pp, hardback
    ISBN: 0-903472-10-4
    Notes: Text. Out of print.
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    Ivories from Room SW 37 Fort Shalmaneser part I

    Ivories from Room SW 37, Fort Shalmaneser, part 2

    Front cover of IN 4/2
    Author: G. Herrmann
    Volume: IV/2
    1986
    Format: 472 pls., hardback
    Notes: Plates. Out of print.
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    Ivories from Room SW 37 Fort Shalmaneser part 2

    The Small Collections from Fort Shalmaneser

    Author: G. Herrmann
    Volume: V
    1992
    Format: xiv + 145 pp., 104 pls., hardback
    ISBN: 0-903472-12-0
    Price: £19.95

    Ivories from the North West Palace (1845-1992)

    The front cover of Ivories from Nimrud, vol. VI
    Author: G. Herrmann, S. Laidlaw & H. Coffey
    Volume: VI
    2009
    Format: 168 + 138 pp, 138 b/w, 24 colour plates, hardback
    ISBN: 9780903472265
    Price: £75.00
    Notes:
    The great, ninth century palace which Ashurnasirpal II (883-859) built at his new capital of Kalhu/Nimrud has been excavated over 150 years by various expeditions. Each has been rewarded with remarkable antiquities, including the finest ivories found in the ancient Near East, many of which had been brought to Kalhu by the Assyrian kings. The first ivories were discovered by Austen Henry Layard, followed a century later by Max Mallowan, who found superb ivories in Well NN. Neither Layard nor Mallowan was able to empty Well AJ: this was achieved by the Iraqi Department of Antiquities and Heritage, who retrieved arguably the finest pieces found at Nimrud. Finally, an interesting collection of ivory and bone tubes was found by Muzahim Mahmud, the discoverer of the famous Royal Tombs, in Well 4.
    This volume publishes for the first time the majority of the ivories found in the Palace by location. These include superb examples carved in Assyria proper and across the Levant from North Syria to Phoenicia and provide an outstanding illustration of the minor arts of the early first millennium. In addition ivories found in the Central Palace of Tiglath-pileser III and fragmentary pieces found in the domestic contexts of the Town Wall Houses are also included.
    In addition to a detailed catalogue, this book also aims to assess the present state of ivory studies, discussing the political situation in the Levant, the excavation of the palace, the history of study, the various style-groups of ivories and their possible time and place of production. This volume is the sixth in the Ivories from Nimrud series published by BISI.

    Ivories from Rooms SW11/12 and T10 Fort Shalmaneser, parts 1-2

    Front cover of IN 7/1
    Author: G. Herrmann and S. Laidlaw
    Volume: VII/1-2
    2013
    Format: Hardback, 2 vols.
    ISBN: 9780903472296
    Price: £90.00
    Notes:
    The attached PDF contains the text of volume I: Chapters 1-6 and the Appendices. The full contents, including the Catalogue and Colour & Black and White Plates, are available as print only and can be ordered from Oxbow Books for £90.00. BISI members receive a 20% discount. 
    About Ivories from Nimrud VII - The Lost Art of the Phoenicians 
    Fifty years have passed since the British School of Archaeology in Iraq raised the last ivory from the soil of Fort Shalmaneser. Literally thousands were found, many of which have already been published in Ivories from Nimrud I-V, while VI recorded the outstanding pieces from the North West Palace. Ivories from Nimrud VII, Ivories from Rooms SW11/12 and T10 completes the publication of the assemblages in the Fort, as far as records permit. The ivories of Room SW11/12 are similar in character to those of Room SW37 and probably represent another consignment of booty, while those of T10 in the Throne Room block include pieces from all four traditions, as well as some entirely new ones.

    With the primary publication completed, it is now possible to look at these remarkable ivories as a whole rather than studying them by prov­enance, as is discussed in detail in the Commentary. Not surprisingly, it immediately becomes apparent that the majority can be assigned to the Phoenician tradition. There are at least twice as many Phoenician ivo­ries than the other Levantine and Assyrian ivories. They form therefore an incredible archive, recording the lost art of the Phoenicians, long famed as master craftsmen.

    The Phoenician ivories can be divided into two; the finest, the Clas­sic Phoenician, often embellished with delicate, jewel-like inlays, and the other examples still clearly Phoenician in style and subject. While the Classic pieces were probably carved in a single centre, possibly Tyre or Sidon, the others would have been carved in a variety of dif­ferent Phoenician centres, located along the Mediterranean seaboard.

    Designs on Syrian-Intermediate ivories are versions of some Phoe­nician subjects, employing different proportions and styles. They may represent the art of the recently-arrived Aramaean kingdoms, copying their sophisticated neighbours, while North Syrian ivories are entirely different in subject and character and derive from earlier Hittite traditions.

    The ivories found at Nimrud present a unique resource for studying the minor arts of the Levantine world.
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    Ivories from Rooms SW11/12 and T10 Fort Shalmaneser
  • Tell Brak Excavations

    Excavations at Tell Brak, Vol. I: The Mitanni and Old Babylonian Periods

    Author: D. Oates, J. Oates, H. McDonald
    Volume: I
    1998
    Format: 296pp
    ISBN: 0951942050
    Notes: This volume is currently out of print.

    Available to download in PDF format from the Archive of Mesopotamian Archaeological Reports at Stony Brook University Digital Library.

    Excavations at Tell Brak, Vol II: Nagar in The Third Millennium BC

    Author: D. Oates, J. Oates, H. McDonald, et al.
    Volume: II
    2001
    Format: Hardback, 643p, H280 x W216 (mm) 100s of b/w figs and illus
    ISBN: 9780951942093
    Price: £95.00
    Notes: Available to download in PDF format from the Archive of Mesopotamian Archaeological Reports at Stony Brook University Digital Library.

    Excavations at Tell Brak Vol. IV: Exploring a Regional Centre in Upper Mesopotamia, 1994-1996

    Author: Roger Matthews and Wendy Matthews
    Volume: IV
    2003
    Format: Hardback, 512pp, H280 x W216 (mm) 326 b/w figs, 79 tbs
    ISBN: 9781902937168
    Price: £19.95
    Notes: Available to download in PDF format from the Archive of Mesopotamian Archaeological Reports at Stony Brook University Digital Library.
  • Samarra Studies Publication Series

    Samarra I: The Historical Topography of Samarra

    Author: Alastair Northedge
    Volume: I
    2008
    Format: 426p, A4, 91 pls, 116 b/w illus, paperback
    ISBN: 9780903472227
    Price: £10
    Notes: Originally published in conjunction with the Max van Berchem Foundation, the BISI/BSAI has re-published with some revisions Alastair Northedge’s Historical Topography of Samarra in a paperback version with a new preface commenting on Samarra’s recent tragedies. This is the first fundamentally new work to come out in half a century on one of the world’s most famous Islamic archaeological sites: Samarra in Iraq. This capital of the Abbasid caliphs in the 9th century is not only one of the largest urban sites worldwide, but also gives us the essence of what the physical appearance of the caliphate was like, for early Baghdad is long lost. It was known not only for its famous spiral minarets, but also for its Golden Dome over the tombs of the Imams, and its long avenues of mud-brick architecture - the latter still visible, although the Golden Dome was horrifically destroyed in a bombing in February 2006 and its two remaining minarets in another bombing in June 2007. With the end of Saddam’s regime in Iraq, there is renewed interest in the Abbasid caliphate “the Golden Age of Early Islam”, rightly seen as the foundation of modern Iraq.
    Northedge sets out to explain the history and development of this enormous site, 45 km long, using both archaeological and textual sources to weave a new interpretation of how the city worked: its four caliphal palaces, four Friday mosques, cantonments for the military and for the palace servants, houses for the men of state and generals. Samarra is particularly strong on the archaeology of sport: polo grounds, courses for horse-racing, and hunting reserves. After treating the origins of the Abbasid city under the Sasanians, the author then analyses each sector of the city, and explains why it was abandoned at the end of the 9th century. The volume is abundantly illustrated with aerial photographs of the site. This is the first of a series of Samarra Studies; in the second, The Archaeological Atlas of Samarra (2015), the archaeological remains are catalogued, and in the third, Pottery from Samarra, the ceramic finds from the archaeological survey will be published.
    Alastair Northedge is Professor of Islamic Art and Archaeology at Université de Paris 1. He has worked in Syria, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan, and conducted projects at Amman in Jordan, and Ana in Iraq, in addition to Samarra. He is the author of Studies on Roman and Islamic Amman, and joint author of Excavations at Ana, with Andrina Bamber and Michael Roaf.  
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    The Historical Topography of Samarra 

    Archaeological Atlas of Samarra: Samarra Studies II

    Author: Alastair Northedge and Derek Kennet
    Volume: II
    2015
    Format: 831 pp, A4, hardback, 2 volumes and 1 fascicle
    ISBN: 9780903472302
    Price: £64.00
    Notes: The Archaeological Atlas of Samarra sets out to map and catalogue the site and buildings of the Abbasid capital at Samarra in the period 836 to 892 AD, preserved as they were until the middle years of the 20th century. Site maps and catalogues are provided of all the approximately 5819 building and site units identified. This is the first time that it has been possible to catalogue nearly all the buildings of one of the world’s largest ancient cities, from the caliph palaces to the smallest hovels.
    Alastair Northedge is Professor of Islamic Art and Archaeology at Université de Paris 1 (Panthéon-Sorbonne). He has worked in Syria, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan, and conducted projects at Amman in Jordan, Ana in Iraq, and Misriyan in Turkmenistan, in addition to Samarra. He is the author of Studies on Roman and Islamic Amman, and joint author of Excavations at Ana.
    Dr Derek Kennet is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Archaeology at Durham University where he has been since 1998. His research area includes the later pre-Islamic to Islamic periods of Iraq, the Gulf and the western Indian Ocean. He has conducted fieldwork in Iran, India, Kuwait, the UAE and Oman.
    Published by: The British Institute for the Study of Iraq with support from the Fondation Max van Berchem
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  • Iraq Archaeological Reports

    Excavations at 'Āna: Qal'a Island

    Author: A. Northedge et al.
    Volume: I
    1988
    Format: Paperback, 192pp, H297 x W210 (mm) 16 plates, 57 figures
    ISBN: 9780856684258
    Price: £25.00
    Notes:
    This was a rescue project in the basin of the Qadisiyya Dam recently completed at Haditha. Qal'at 'Ana is an island in the stream of the Euphrates, the site of the ancient and medieval city of 'Ana, since the 17th century downgraded to a village and palm-gardens, while the town moved to the right bank. 'Ana, on the Middle Euphrates some 150 km below the modern Iraqi-Syrian border, a very beautiful place, was the centre of an autonomous governorate under the Assyrians, a border fortress under the Parthians, Romans and Sasanians, and a caravan town and bedouin centre under Islam.

    Available for download in PDF format from the Archive of Mesopotamian Archaeological Reports at Stony Brook University Digital Library.

    Excavations at Tell Rubeidheh: an Uruk Village in the Jebel Hamrin

    Author: T. Cuyler Young et al.
    Editor: R.G. Killick
    Volume: II
    1988
    Format: Paperback
    ISBN: 9780856684319
    Price: £19.95
    Notes: Available for download in PDF format from the Archive of Mesopotamian Archaeological Reports at Stony Brook University Digital Library.

    Settlement Development in the North Jazira, Iraq: a Study of the Archaeological Landscape

    Author: T.J. Wilkinson & D.J. Tucker
    Volume: III
    1995
    Format: Paperback. 240p, H297 x W210 (mm) with b/w pls, maps and line-drawings
    ISBN: 9780856686580
    Price: £35.00
    Notes: Available to download in PDF format from the Archive of Mesopotamian Archaeological Reports at Stony Brook University Digital Library.

    The Excavations at Tell al Rimah: The Pottery

    Author: C. Postgate, D. Oates & J. Oates
    Volume: IV
    1997
    Format: Paperback, 276p, H297 x W210 (mm) copious pls, figs, tabs
    ISBN: 9780856687006
    Price: £25.00
    Notes: Introductory report and a detailed illustrated catalogue of the pottery finds from this second millennium BC Assyrian site, in modern northern Iraq.

    Available to download in PDF format from the Archive of Mesopotamian Archaeological Reports in the Stony Brook University Digital Library.

    Artefacts of Complexity: Tracking the Uruk in the Ancient Near East

    Editor: J.N. Postgate
    Volume: V
    2002
    Format: Paperback, 264p, H297 x W210 (mm) many b/w illus and figs
    ISBN: 9780856687365
    Price: £40.00
    Notes:
     
    The late 4th millennium in South Mesopotamia is universally known as the Uruk Period because it is at Uruk that the German excavations have exposed the most remarkable manifestations of this complex society. Although the Uruk period in Iraq itself remains little understood, in recent decades artefacts and entire settlements have been discovered in places as far apart as the Mahi Dasht in Iran and the Euphrates in South-eastern Turkey. This volume attempts to track the Uruk phenomenon in the Near East, bringing together research on some of the most significant individual sites within the Levant and Egypt, placing emphasis on the artefactual evidence. The eleven papers were originally presented at a conference in Manchester in 1998. The contributors are Hans Nissen, Renate Gut, Mitchell Rothman, Virginia Badler, Joan Oates, Marcella Frangipane, Gil Stein, Fiona Stephen, Edgar Peltenburg, Govert van Driel, Graham Philip and Toby Wilkinson.

    Secrets of the Dark Mound: Jemdet Nasr 1926-1928

    Author: Roger Matthews
    2002
    ISBN: 0856687359
    Notes: Available to download in PDF format from the Archive of Mesopotamian Archaeological Reports at Stony Brook University Digital Library.

Fifty Years of Mesopotamian Discovery: The Work of the British School of Archaeology in Iraq, 1932-1982

front cover of Fifty Years of Mesopotamian Discovery
Editor: J. Curtis
1982
Format: 120pp., paperback
ISBN: 0903472058
Notes: Out of print.
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Fifty Years of Mesopotamian Discovery

The Middle Babylonian Legal and Economic Texts from Ur

Author: O.R. Gurney
1982
Format: 203pp., 4 plates, hardback
ISBN: 0903472074

Nimrud: An Assyrian Imperial City Revealed

Front cover of Nimrud
Author: David and Joan Oates
2001
Format: Paperback, 309p, H239 x W159 (mm) 175 b/w illus, maps and plans, 16 col pls
ISBN: 9780903472258
Price: £19.95
Notes: Nimrud (ancient Kalhu) in northern Iraq, was the capital of the Assyrian Empire during most of the 9th and 8th centuries BC, and remained a major centre until the destruction of the Empire in 612 BC. This authoritative account, written by two of the excavators of the site, traces its history and its gradual revelation through archaeological excavation, begun by Layard in the 19th century and continuing to the present day. The volume is abundantly illustrated and includes finds that have not previously been published, together with illustrations and the most complete account in English so far of the remarkable discoveries made in recent years by Iraqi archaeologists in the tombs of the Assyrian Queens.
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Nimrud: An Assyrian Imperial City Revealed

The Published Ivories from Fort Shalmaneser, Nimrud

Front cover of Published Ivories from Fort Shalmaneser
Author: G. Herrmann, S. Laidlaw & H. Coffey
2004
ISBN: 9780903472166
Price: £18.00
Notes:
Nimrud is an exceptionally generous site, and has richly rewarded those that work there. It was first famous for the Assyrian bas reliefs found by the 19th century archaeologist, Austen Henry Layard, but is also famous for the thousands of ivories found during the 19th and 20th centuries. The ivories were mostly imported from the Levantine kingdoms to the west, either as tribute or booty, although there were some in the distinctive local Assyrian style. They were used to embellish furniture, as well as small objects, and are carved in a great variety of styles, but interestingly with a relatively limited repertoire of subjects. Their time of manufacture probably dates to the early centuries of the first millennium BCE, although their archaeological context is dated by the fall of the Assyrian empire in 614-612 BCE. This publication is a supplement to the volumes already published, which catalogue the ivories, and instead presents scans from the original photographs, where possible, of the ivories from Fort Shalmaneser, which have been published in the first five volumes, so that scholars can select and rearrange ivories as appropriate. In this way, the next generation of work involving deeper stylistic and analytic studies by a range of scholars asking different questions may be undertaken.
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The Published Ivories from Fort Shalmaneser, Nimrud

Studies in the Ancient History of Northern Iraq (reprint)

Author: David Oates
2005
Format: Hardback, 176p, H285 x W220 (mm) b/w illus, 16 b/w plate
ISBN: 9780903472197
Price: £30
Notes: Subsequent examination of Stein’s draft-manuscript showed that further investigation and a more leisurely assessment were demanded by the range and importance of the subject and by changing perspectives. With the aid of the Stein Bequest to the British Academy, David Oates gave new substance to ‘the lost traveller’s dream’, extending it widely into a more general account of the Mesopotamian scene from the Assyrian period in the second millennium BC to the struggles of Rome and Byzantium with the Parthians and Sasanians in the early centuries AD. The book concludes with a study of little-known Hellenistic, Roman and Parthian pottery, mostly from the author’s excavations.
David Oates went on to serve the British School of Archaeology in Iraq as field director at Nimrud, director of the excavations at Tell al-Rimah, as Director of the School in Baghdad, Member of the Council, Chairman and President. David Oates died in 2003 and the reprinting of this volume by the School in his memory has been generously funded by The Charlotte Bonham-Carter Charitable Trust.
There have been no changes to the text or images (including a Foreword by Sir Mortimer Wheeler) and the pagination has remained the same. David’s widow and long-time collaborator, Dr Joan Oates, has added a Preface illustrated by a photograph from the author’s collection.
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Studies in the Ancient History of Northern Iraq

Languages of Iraq: Ancient and Modern

Editor: Nicholas Postgate
2007
Format: pp. viii, 187. 32 b/w maps and illustrations. Size 240 x 160mm
ISBN: 978-0- 903472-21-0
Price: £15
Notes: For all five thousand years of its history Iraq has been home to a mixture of languages, spoken and written, and the same is true today. In November 2003, to celebrate the country's rich diversity and long history as a centre of civilisation, BISl presented a series of talks by experts on each of the major languages of Iraq and their history, and this illustrated volume brings these now to a wider public.
Iraq's languages come from different linguistic families - Semitic, Indo-European, and agglutinative languages like Sumerian, Hurrian and Turkish. Some, although long dead, have a prime place in the history of the Old World: Sumerian, probably the first language to be written and the vehicle of cuneiform scholarship for more than two millennia, and Akkadian, the language of Hammurapi and the Epic of Gilgamesh, and used across the Near East for administration and diplomacy. The history of Aramaic is even longer, stretching back to overlap with Akkadian before 1000 BC. It survives, precariously, in both written and spoken forms, being one of four languages spoken in Iraq today. Of these Arabic as a major world language has often been described, but here we have an account of the vernacular Iraqi Arabic dialects, and the descriptions of Iraqi Kurdish and Turkman are unique, detailed and authoritative.
Printed by Cambridge University Press.
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Languages of Iraq: Ancient and Modern 

New Light on Nimrud: Proceedings of the Nimrud Conference 11th-13th March 2002

Front cover of New Light on Nimrud
Editor: J.E. Curtis, H. McCall, D. Collon and L. al-Gailani Werr
2008
Format: 336 pages, 9 pages colour plates, 8 pages plans & 295 b/w illustrations. Hardback, A4
ISBN: ISBN 978-0-903472-24-1
Price: £40.00
Notes:
This book publishes 34 papers by international and Iraqi experts given at a conference on Nimrud at The British Museum in 2002. Excavations at the important Assyrian capital city of Nimrud have continued intermittently since 1845, culminating with the discovery in 1989-90 of the tombs of the Assyrian queens with astonishing quantities of gold jewellery. All aspects of the excavations and the various finds and inscribed material from Nimrud are considered in this volume, with particular attention being paid to the tombs of the queens and their contents. The evidence of inscriptions and the results of paleopathological investigation are brought together to identify the bodies in the tombs. There is much previously unpublished information about the tombs, and the jewellery is fully illustrated in eight colour plates. Finally, the significance of Nimrud as one of the greatest sites in the Ancient Near East is fully assessed.
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Once There Was a Place: Settlement Archaeology at Chagar Bazar, 1999-2002

Author: Augusta McMahon with Carlo Colantoni, Julia Frane and Arkadiusz Soltysiak
Volume: 2010
2010
Format: Paperback, 428p, 88 plates
ISBN: 9780903472272
Price: £25.00
Notes:
This volume presents the research of the British team within the modern excavations at the northern Mesopotamian site of Chagar Bazar, resumed in 1999 after a 62-year hiatus since the excavations of Max Mallowan.  It incorporates settlement archaeology approaches and theoretical ideas of “place” in exploring the site and its internal and external landscapes.  The primary focus is the settlement during the early 2nd millennium BC (Old Babylonian Period, post-Samsi-Addu), its final ancient occupation. The authors have taken a contextual approach, integrating aspects of the settlement’s internal variations, including both community and private architecture, together with burial practices and symbolic and functional material culture.  While its political importance varied, Chagar Bazar’s persistence of occupation meant that it played a key role within the regional landscape as a meaningful landmark.
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Once There Was a Place: Settlement Archaeology at Chagar Bazar, 1999-2002

Your Praise is Sweet - A Memorial Volume for Jeremy Black from Students, Colleagues and Friends

Editor: Heather D. Baker, Eleanor Robson and Gábor Zólyomi
2011
Format: Hardback, A4, 472 pp (xii + 460)
ISBN: ISBN- 978-0-903472-28-9
Price: £35
Notes: This volume is intended as a tribute to the memory of the Sumerologist Jeremy Black, who died in 2004. The Sumerian phrase, ‘Your praise is sweet’ is commonly addressed to a deity at the close of a work of Sumerian literature. The scope of the thirty contributions, from Sumerology to the nineteenth-century rediscovery of Mesopotamia, is testament to Jeremy’s own wide-ranging interests and to his ability to forge scholarly connections and friendships among all who shared his interest in ancient Iraq.
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Your Praise is Sweet - A Memorial Volume for Jeremy Black from Students, Colleagues and Friends


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