Saturday, January 18, 2020

Open Access Journal: Electryone - `Hλεκτρυώνη

[First posted in AWOL 28 January 2014, updated 18 January 2020]

Electryone - `Hλεκτρυώνη
ISSN: 2241-4061

Electryone is an English-language, peer reviewed online journal devoted to ancient historical and philological issues covering the period between the 2nd and 1st millennia BC  and the Roman period A.D.  Electryone welcomes articles between 4,000 and 8.000 words, shorter notes, responses, etc. up to 2,500 words, and book reviews. It also welcomes presentations of new publications, announcements for conferences and information about research programs.

Electryone focuses on the Mediterranean region and on matters referring to interactions of the Mediterranean with neighboring areas, but presents an international forum of research, innovative interpretations, critical reviews, analyses of ancient text sources, comparative studies, mythological issues, archive research reports, interaction of ancient history with topography and archaeology, and applied new technologies on historical and classical studies.
Electryone covers the full range of classical studies (i.e. 2nd millennium to late Rome) but is particularly interested in classical antiquity and its relationship to other cultures.
Most recent issue:
ELECTRYONE 2019

Volume 6, Issue1

Asymmetries in sculptured heads of ancient greek intellectuals
Evi Sarantea evi.sarantea@hotmail.com
ELECTRYONE 
2019
Volume 6, Issue 1
 | pp.
39-56
Abstract:
Some sculptured heads of ancient Greek intellectuals, preserved today in Roman copies, are portrayed with asymmetries (dissimilarities between the two sides) and are of special interest. Dissimilarities usually involve the size, the shape, or the positioning of the eyes. Some slight deformation of the left side of the face is noticeable. These asymmetries occur in a small percentage of the Roman copies, and it is thought by the author that they are deliberate and intentional. They fall within a particular manner of rendering of the figures which runs through the centuries-long Greek tradition of portraiture from the Archaic period to the Byzantine era. The sculptors of the Roman age produced copies of the original heads of distinguished ancient Greek intellectuals, differentiating their appearance slightly and designing them with calculated asymmetries. In this way they drew attention to the superiority of these figures to ordinary people, or a sense of awe felt towards these spiritual benefactors of mankind. Certain of the differences between the right and left side of the heads are possibly associated with Dualism.
Subjects:Uncategorized



“Their Head Full of Fragments”: Newfoundland Author Al Pittman’s West Moon, Monuments, Fragments, and Ruins
Stephanie McKenzie Memorial University
ELECTRYONE 
2019
Volume 6, Issue 1
 | pp.
28-38
Abstract:
This paper is written in a narrative style to enhance points made about different cultural stories. It compares Newfoundland author Al Pittman’s play, West Moon, with ancient monuments in Greece in order to underscore how important it is for different cultures to understand each other’s monuments and ruins. While there are no ancient ruins in Newfoundland comparable to those in Greece, the ruins spoken of in West Moon (the mostly deserted traditional outports, or fishing villages) carry an importance similarity to ancient Greek monuments. They speak of traditions, a connection between past and present, and cultural ways, and they ultimately make one aware of the importance of a culture. The paper considers how some cultures have oral “ruins” as much as oral continuance, the latter based on the passing down of stories, and how both oral and written monuments are equally important. Inevitably, this paper turns briefly to a consideration of today’s refugee crises and posits that the recognizing of cultural continuance and remnants of monuments (carried with people through memory and narrative) might help break down the hopeless divides between “us” and “them.”
Subjects:Uncategorized


Socrates – a Philosophy of Mission?
Matúš Porubjak Department of Philosophy and Applied Philosophy, University of Ss. Cyril and Methodius in Trnava, Slovakia matus.porubjak@ucm.sk matusporubjak@gmail.com
ELECTRYONE 
2019
Volume 6, Issue 1
 | pp.
15-27
Abstract:
This philosophical essay aims to return to the Socratic problem, ask it anew, and make an attempt to find its possible solution. In the introduction, the author briefly discusses the genesis of the Socratic problem and the basic methodological problems we encounter when dealing with it. Further on, it defines five basic sources of information about Socrates on which the interpretation tradition is based. Then the author outlines two key features of Socrates’ personality, aligned with the vast majority of sources: (1) Socrates’ belief that he has no theoretical knowledge; (2) Socrates’ predilection towards practical questions, and the practical dimension of his activity. In conclusion, the author expresses his belief that it is just this practical dimension of philosophy that has been in the ‘blind spot’ of the modern study of Socrates which paid too much attention to the search for his doctrine. The history of philosophy, however, does not only have to be the history of doctrines, but can also be the history of reflected life practices which inspire followers in their own practices while reflecting on them. The author therefore proposes to understand the historical Socrates as the paradigmatic figure of practical philosophy.
Subjects:Uncategorized


The Myth of Ovid’s Exile
Michael Fontaine Cornell University fontaine@cornell.edu
ELECTRYONE 
2019
Volume 6, Issue 1
 | pp.
1-14
Abstract:
Ovid was not exiled; the evidence is massively against it. This is not a new idea, but it is a deeply unpopular, even heretical one. In this paper, I suggest reasons why scholars resist it, and I plead for a new understanding of what the “exile” poetry is.
Subjects:Uncategorized

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