Tuesday, April 26, 2011

News from the CDLI: Museum of Art and Archaeology (University of Missouri-Columbia) cuneiform collection

Museum of Art and Archaeology (University of Missouri-Columbia) cuneiform collection in CDLI 
The Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative (CDLI), in partnership with the Museum of Art and Archaeology, University of Missouri-Columbia (MAA-UMo), is pleased to announce the addition of new digital content to its web offerings. 
29 of  the 36 cuneiform artifacts in the MAA-UMo are on long-term loan from the Missouri School of Religion (formerly “Bible College of Missouri”), Jefferson City, Missouri, and of these, 14 were recently published in A. Goetze, Yale Oriental Series 15 (see the online listings, and CDLN 2010:004; the suspicion voiced there that the MSR texts were in fact at UMo-Columbia is therefore confirmed--they were transferred there 37 years ago). The remaining 15 inscriptions as well as seven further pieces in the MAA-UMo collection are, so far as we have been able to ascertain, unpublished, aside from some few references in popular press outlets. Last month, as part of a digitization mission through Missouri, Indiana and MichiganUCLA graduate student Michael Heinle scanned the artifacts, and the results of the UMo effort have now been added to CDLI pages, viewable here. We welcome the inspection of these images by specialists, and are grateful for their corrections of our catalogue, or notices of their interest in publishing the unedited texts in the collection.
The imaging and image processing were made possible by funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and are part of the on-going mission of CDLI to ensure the long-term digital preservation of ancient insc-riptions on cuneiform artifacts, and, in furtherance of cuneiform research, to provide free global access to all available text artifact data. 
For the CDLI and the MAA-UMo: 
Robert K. Englund, UCLA
Benton Kidd, Associate Curator of Ancient Art, MAA-UMo

Open Access Journal: The Sungkyun Journal of East Asian Studies (SJEAS)

The Sungkyun Journal of East Asian Studies (SJEAS)

The Sungkyun Journal of East Asian Studies (SJEAS), published since the year 2001 by Academy of East Asian Studies (AEAS) at Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, Korea, is a referred multidisciplinary journal dedicated to East Asian Studies. With original contributions from all parts of the world, the SJEAS enjoys thriving reputation and increasing readership in the field of East Asian Studies. The SJEAS published biannually in April and October has been selected for coverage in Thomson Reuters' Current Contents / Arts & Humanities, and Arts & Humanities Citation Index.
Call for Papers
The SJEAS publishes articles, research notes, and book reviews relating to East Asian matters.
The SJEAS also seeks original academic papers, which delved into the past and present of East Asia, primarily within the field of the humanities. Research areas the SJEAS prefers include philosophy, religion, art, anthropology, archaeology, literature, history and culture. Scholars considering submission are encouraged to use a multidisciplinary approach which transcend the conventional boundaries between these subjects. Paper on social science are also welcomed as long as topics and methodologies benefit and broaden the perspectives of humanities.

Sponsored by the AEAS, which aims to promote interdisciplinary research relating to the region of East Asia, the SJEAS generally supports academic interests and goals of the AEAS.
While respecting explorations of the past and the present of East Asia that remain within traditional boundaries, the SJEAS also seeks papers that deal with East Asia in its whole as well as works, which explore common identities and mutual contrasts found in East Asian countries. All contributions are peer-reviewed and subject to final decision by the SJEAS
editorial committee.

Please consult the section "How to prepare manuscript" under "Submissions" menu for stylistic requirements.

For further details, authors considering a contribution are advised to contact:

MANAGING EDITOR
Sungkyun Journal of East Asian Studies

Academy of East Asian Studies
Sungkyunkwan University
53 Myeongnyun-dong 3-ga, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 110-745, Korea
sjeas@skku.edu
Tel: 82 (0) 2 760 0740 / Fax: 82 (0) 2 760 0780
18 Vol.10 No.01 Apr. 2010

17 Vol.09 No.02 Oct. 2009

16 Vol.09 No.01 Apr. 2009

15 Vol.08 No.02 Oct. 2008

14 Vol.08 No.01 Apr. 2008

13 Vol.07 No.02 Oct. 2007

12 Vol.07 No.01 Apr. 2007

11 Vol.06 No.02 Oct. 2006

10 Vol.06 No.01 Apr. 2006










Friday, April 22, 2011

News from the CDLI: Saint Louis Art Museum cuneiform collection in

Saint Louis Art Museum cuneiform collection in CDLI
The Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative (CDLI), in partnership with the Saint Louis Art Museum (SLAM), is pleased to announce the addition of new digital content to its web offerings. 
 
As with many modest collections compiled from a number of sources, the 42 cuneiform artifacts in the Saint Louis Art Museum consist of a larger number of Ur III accounts, and of smaller groups of Old Akkadian, Old Babylonian and neo-Babylonian/Achaemenid texts. Last month, UCLA graduate student Michael Heinle was able to scan the artifacts as part of a digitization mission through Missouri, Indiana and Michigan, and the results of the SLAM effort have now been added to CDLI pages, viewable here. 32 of the texts have been published in some form, most (nearly all of the Ur III texts) by R. David Freedman in concise catalogue entries in his 1975 Columbia University Thesis "The Cuneiform Tablets in St. Louis" (though we note that neither CDLI nor BDTNS is in possession of transliterations of the Freedman SLAM texts; Mr. Heinle is now working to remedy that gap in our coverage). Ten are not known by us to have been edited, and we welcome publication references, or notices of interest in publishing these texts by specialists.
 
The imaging and image processing were made possible by funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and are part of the on-going mission of CDLI to ensure the long-term digital preservation of ancient insc-riptions on cuneiform tablets, and, in furtherance of cuneiform research, to provide free global access to all available text artifact data. It will not escape the readers of this notice that Mellon also supports the SLAM staff member who organized the visit by Heinle in St. Louis.
 
For the CDLI and the SLAM:  
Robert K. Englund, UCLA
Lisa Cakmak, Mellon Fellow in Ancient Art, SLAM



Thursday, April 21, 2011

Mappable places in Pleiades for Google Earth

All the mappable places in Pleiades (more than 30,000) in a single file for viewing in Google Earth (or reuse/remixing under terms of our Creative Commons license). Via Sean Gillies and Tom Elliott

Mappable places in Pleiades kml file

Wednesday, April 20, 2011

News from the Griffith Institute


And see Open Access Archives: Griffith Institute

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Administrative Note

AWOL Statistics

As of today, the number of email addresses subscribed to AWOL's feedburner email notification service is 2,411.  The subscriber list increases by about one hundred each month.

AWOL' s Alphabetical list of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies currently includes 894 titles.


AWOL went on line  January 6, 2009.  Since then we have had 340,320 page loads, from 202,839 unique visitors. 56,560 of these made more than one visit.


Since May 2010, Blogger has been keeping detailed statistics on usage of files hosted there. In that period the ten most frequently viewed AWOL pages have been:
Oct 22, 2010, 55 comments
,  26,080 Pageviews









Oct 11, 2010, 4 comments, 
3,823 Pageviews









Oct 18, 2009
1, 565 Pageviews









Dec 18, 2010, 
956 Pageviews









Jan 5, 2011, 
929 Pageviews









Mar 11, 2011, 1 comment
,  919 Pageviews









Dec 7, 2010
,  706 Pageviews









Feb 18, 2011, 
614 Pageviews









Sep 12, 2010
,  528 Pageviews









Jul 18, 2010
,  507 Pageviews

Administrative notes with user statistics have been posted in March 2012, November 2011, October 2011July 2011, April 2011, January 2011December 2010October 2010, August 2010July 2010, May 2010, and  January 2010.


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Tuesday, April 19, 2011

News from the CDLI: Kalamazoo Valley Museum cuneiform collection in CDLI

Kalamazoo Valley Museum cuneiform collection in CDLI
The Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative (CDLI), in partnership with the Kalamazoo Valley Museum (KVM) located in Kalamazoo, Michigan--established in 1881 in the city’s library basement and since 1991 operated by the Kalamazoo Valley Community College--is pleased to announce the addition of new digital content to its web offerings.


In 2007, Andrea Seri, then at Harvard University, published an edition of the collection (CDLJ 2007/1), but, due to funding constraints, we could not have the physical artifacts imaged according to CDLI’s fatcross standards. Last month, UCLA graduate student Michael Heinle was able to scan the 61 Kalamazoo text artifacts as part of a digitization mission through Missouri, Indiana and Michigan, and the  results of the KVM effort have now been added to CDLI pages, viewable here.
The imaging and image processing were made possible by funding from  the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and are part of the on-going mission of CDLI to ensure the long-term digital preservation of ancient inscriptions on cuneiform tablets, and, in furtherance of cuneiform research, to provide free global access to all available text artifact data. 


For the CDLI and the KVM: 
Robert K. Englund, UCLA
Paula L. Metzner, Asst. Director of Collections, KVM

The Jewish National and University Library Digitized Book Repository

The Jewish National and University Library Digitized Book Repository

לחץ כאן לכניסה למאגר The Jewish National and University Library is proud to announce the first stage of a project to digitize rare and out-of-print monographs from its collection.

The aim of this project is to make these works freely available not only to on site users but also to the public worldwide. This will both preserve the originals and greatly increase the number of people who will be able to refer to them.


About 1100 volumes have been digitized with the generous support of the Dorot Foundation. Additional works are added weekly. Selection will be based on considerations of demand, preservation and funding. Only works in the public domain will be considered.


The JNUL catalog record for each such work contains a link to the digitized version.


The initial selection of titles ranges from 15th century incunabula to early 20th century works.


RSS feed: Digitized Book Repository - new titles (last month)

List of new titles (last month)


List of titles by date

List of titles by subjects

The books are presented in the DjVu format which provides high quality, magnifiable images compressed into relatively small files for easy downloading. In order to view these images it is necessary to download and install (once) a special free viewer program.
Click here to download DjVu Browser Plug-in.

Open Access Publication: The Demotic Dictionary of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago, Letter 'I

The Demotic Dictionary of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago

As part of its ELECTRONIC PUBLICATIONS ON-LINE, the Oriental Institute Publications Office announces an additional letter, 'I, for the Chicago Demotic Dictionary, edited by Janet H. Johnson. This document is available in the Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format (PDF) file.


Letters completed to date include:

Completed Letters Download
Prologue Download PDF Terms of Use
3 Download PDF Terms of Use
'I Download PDF Terms of Use
c Download PDF Terms of Use
Y Download PDF Terms of Use
W Download PDF Terms of Use
B Download PDF Terms of Use
P Download PDF Terms of Use
F Download PDF Terms of Use
M Download PDF Terms of Use
N Download PDF Terms of Use
R Download PDF Terms of Use
L Download PDF Terms of Use
H Download PDF Terms of Use
H2 Download PDF Terms of Use
H3 Download PDF Terms of Use
H4 Download PDF Terms of Use
SH Download PDF Terms of Use
Q Download PDF Terms of Use
K Download PDF Terms of Use
G Download PDF Terms of Use
TJ Download PDF Terms of Use
DJ Download PDF Terms of Use
Problematic Entries Download PDF Terms of Use
Problematic Entries 2 Download PDF Terms of Use


For an up to date list of all Oriental Institute publications available online see:

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Monday, April 18, 2011

Open Access Journal: The Egyptian Journal of Remote Sensing and Space Sciences (EJRS)

The Egyptian Journal of Remote Sensing and Space Sciences (EJRS) 
The Egyptian Journal of Remote Sensing and Space Sciences is a peer reviewed journal under the responsibility of the National Authority for Remote Sensing and Space Sciences (NARSS). It aims at publishing quality research scientific articles that will cover all aspects of remote sensing and its applications in different subject areas such as: geology, mineral exploration, hydrogeology, geomorphology, planetary geology, soil sciences, agriculture, space archeology, surveying, urban planning, environment, engineering geology, image and signal processing, coastal research and space sciences.

Articles should be concise, innovative and of interest to a broad spectrum of readers.



Volume 12 ,2009
Read Articles
Volume 11 ,2008
Read Articles
Volume 10 ,2007
Read Articles
Volume 9 ,2006
Read Articles
Volume 8 ,2005
Read Articles
Volume 7 ,2004
Read Articles
Volume 6 ,2003
Read Articles
Volume 5 ,2002
Read Articles
Volume 4 ,2001
Read Articles
Volume 3 ,2000
Read Articles
Volume 2 ,1999
Read Articles
Volume 1 ,1999
Read Articles


















































































See the full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies.

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Saturday, April 16, 2011

Forthcoming Open Access Journal: Egyptological

Egyptological
Egyptological is a new concept in archaeological publishing, which is available free of charge to all readers.  Part of the Egyptological Online (E.O.) group of websites Egyptological was founded by Andrea Byrnes and Kate Phizackerley in 2011.  Our idea was to provide the first free online-only Egyptology magazine which would provide our readers with:
  • A free-of-charge resource
  • A diverse selection of high quality material to reflect varied levels of academic and popular interest, all subject to editorial review
  • Research papers and popular articles
  • Exhibition, book, DVD and website reviews
  • Conference reports
  • Events and course calendars
  • A regularly updated photograph gallery
  • A platform for both new and existing writers to publish their material in a friendly and helpful environment
  • Assistance for new writers if required
  • The opportunity to join a community of like-minded people to advance the spread of good quality information about ancient Egypt
Egyptological covers all areas and periods of ancient Egyptian prehistory up to and including the Coptic period. If you have an interest in Ancient Egypt we hope that you will find articles, exhibition, book and DVD reviews, and much more value-added content to keep you entertained and informed.
Egyptological provides an environment for writers and researchers of all levels of experience.  It is divided into three main sections to enable you to find the type of content that you are looking for:
Journal features hand-picked research papers produced to academic standards and subjected to a rigorous editorial review process which follows guidelines for academic publications.  Papers in Journal will usually refelct the specialized research interests of the authors.
Magazine publishes articles, book, television and DVD reviews and exhibtion and conference reports.  Articles tend to be several pages long and are aimed at a wide audience.  All articles are subject to editorial review.
Colloquy is the place for short pieces, quick reviews and informal articles on a vast variety of topics.  There are also a frequently changing photo album contributed by readers, events and courses listings and our Discussion forum for asking questions, making suggestions and putting forward ideas.  This section will be updated on an ad hoc basis.  Expect to find a  real mix of content here!

Each issue will include at least three major articles in the Journal and Magazine sections with many more features and reviews to browse and enjoy, which will be added to the website on a more regular and less formal basis.
Our editorial and technical staff are all volunteers, and our writers all contribute articles free of charge. This enables us to operate both the Editions and the Magazine section without advertising or other commercial input.  By accepting advertising in the Colloquy section we are able to pay hosting and other costs whilst ensuring that the magazine remains free of charge to all visitors.

We very much hope that you enjoy Egyptological.  Don’t forget to get in touch with us if you have any questions or ideas.
The first issue will appear on June 30, 2011.



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Friday, April 15, 2011

Open Access Monographs: Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Monographs

Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Monographs
Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Monographs 
1. G. L. Huxley, Anthemius of Tralles: A Study in Later Greek Geometry.  1959. [Link]
2. Emerson Buchanan, Aristotle’s Theory of Being. 1962. [Link]
3. Jack L. Benson, Ancient Leros. 1963. [Link]
4. William M. Calder III, The Inscription from Temple G at Selinus. 1963. [Link]
5. Mervin R. Dilts, ed., Heraclidis Lembi Excerpta Politiarum.  1971. [Link]
6. Eric G. Turner, The Papyrologist at Work.  1973. [Link]
7. Roger S. Bagnall, The Florida Ostraka: Documents from the Roman Army in Upper Egypt.  1976. [Link]
8. Graham Speake, A Collation of the Manuscripts of Sophocles’ Oedipus Coloneus.  1978.
9. Kevin K. Carroll, The Parthenon Inscription.  1982. [Link]
10. Studies Presented to Sterling Dow.  1984. [Link]
11. Michael H. Jameson, David R. Jordan, and Roy D. Kotansky, A Lex Sacra from Selinous.  1993.

Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Scholarly Aids
1. Index of Passages Cited in Herbert Weir Smyth Greek Grammar.  Compiled under the direction of Walter A. Schumann.  1961. [Link]
2. Sterling Dow, Conventions in Editing.  1969. [Link]

Out of series
A Generation of Antiquities: The Duke Classical Collection 1964-1994 (1994). [Link]

As of 15 April 2011, GRBM is at this new address under the Open Journals System with the support of the Duke University Libraries.


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Interactive Album of Mediaeval Palaeography

Interactive Album of Mediaeval Palaeography:  Collection of Transcription Exercises on Mediaeval Documents

Mediaeval Palaeography is a science in its own right, and a long learning process is necessary to master it. It is not only the art of reading writings of the past, but it also encompasses the history of writing, the analysis of forms and contexts of writing (material culture, social History, etc.). The purpose of this interactive album, consisting in a collection of transcription exercises, is not to be a substitute for a proper learning of this science, but simply to allow students or amateurs (genealogists, History enthusiasts, etc.) to train themselves in the practical aspect of palaeography, that is reading manuscript texts.
To learn how to use the exercises, you can read the help page.
Notice: this website is available in English for the most part. Only the introduction (short description) of each exercise is in French, although the text is short.

Website for training in practical palaeographical skills proposed by the transversal Digital Humanities programme of the UMR 5648 - Histoire, Archéologie, Littératures des Mondes Chrétiens et Musulmans Médiévaux (Universités Lyon 2, Lyon 3, Avignon et Pays de Vaucluse; CNRS, EHESS, ENS Lyon)

User manual

 
- by language Latin French
 
- by difficulty Facile Easy Moyen Average Difficile Difficult
 

Thursday, April 14, 2011

New Book from the Oriental Institute: Baked Clay Figurines and Votive Beds from Medinet Habu

Announced today:

book cover

OIP 133.

Baked Clay Figurines and Votive Beds from Medinet Habu


Emily Teeter

This catalog presents the entire corpus of 272 baked clay figurines and votive beds excavated at Medinet Habu in Western Thebes by the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago during its 1926-1933 campaign. The figurines represent women, women with children, men, deities, and animals. They date from the sixteenth century B.C. to the ninth century A.D., illustrating permanence and change in themes of clay figurines as well as stylistic development within each type. The group of votive beds and the small stelae made from votive bed molds are among the largest and most diverse collections of such material. Each object is fully described and illustrated and is accompanied by commentary on construction, symbolism, and function.
  • Oriental Institute Publications 133
  • Chicago: The Oriental Institute, 2010
  • ISBN 978-1-885923-58-5
  • Pp. xxxiv + 216; 21 figures, 2 plans, 132 plates, 1 table
  • $80.00


For an up to date list of all Oriental Institute publications available online see:

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Wednesday, April 13, 2011

The Final Volume of The Assyrian Dictionary of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago

The Oriental Institute Publications Office announces a new print publication: April 13, 2011
"The Assyrian Dictionary of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago: Vol 20 U/W. Edited by Martha T. Roth. 2010."

As part of its Electronic Publications Online, the Oriental Institute Publications Office announces publication of:
"The Assyrian Dictionary of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago: Vol 20 U/W. Edited by Martha T. Roth. 2010."

The Chicago Assyrian Dictionary was conceived to provide more than lexical information alone, more than a one-to-one equivalent between Akkadian and English words. By presenting each word in a meaningful context, usually with a full and idiomatic translation, it recreates the cultural milieu and thus in many ways assumes the function of an encyclopedia. Its source material ranges in time from the third millennium BC to the first century AD, and in geographic area from the Mediterranean Sea in the west to the Zagros Mountains in the east. The Chicago Assyrian Dictionary has become an invaluable source for the study of the civilizations of the ancient Near East, their political and cultural history, their achievements in the sciences of medicine, astronomy, mathematics, and linguistics, and not least the timeless beauty of their poetry. Volume 20: U/W marks the final volume of the set!


I have collected a broad variety of mostly open access materials relating to the history of the CAD at On the CAD


For an up to date list of all Oriental Institute publications available online see:

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