Sunday, May 30, 2010

New Title in AMAR: Ras Shamra, Leukos Limen

Title Ras Shamra, Leukos Limen: die nach-ugaritische Besiedlung von Ras Shamra
Series Mission archeologique de Ras Shamra (Series) ; 1.
Author Stucky, Rolf A.
Publisher Paris: Librairie Orientaliste P. Geuthner,
Date of Publication 1983
Date of Digitization 2010
Subject Excavations (Archaeology) -- Syria
Subject-Geographic Ugarit (Extinct city)
Syria -- Antiquities
Language ger
Description-Original 185 p., 87 p. of plates : ill., maps ; 28 cm
Format-Digital PDF
37.2 MB (39,105,679 bytes)
Acknowledgement Digitized by the Schoenberg Center for Electronic Text and Image at the University of Pennsylvania for the AMAR Collection.
Rights-Access Restrictions May not be reused for commercial purposes.

Earlier references to AMAR in AWOL

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Online Kom Firin Publication from the BM

New from the British Museum

Kom Firin I: the Ramesside temple and the site survey

View  of the south-eastern part of Kom Firin, looking north

Neal Spencer with a contribution by Květa Smoláriková

British Museum Research Publication 170
ISBN 978-086159-170-1
© The Trustees of the British Museum 2008

The first monograph on British Museum fieldwork at Kom Firin in Egypt’s Nile Delta, a settlement created around the time of Ramses II, and occupied until late Antiquity.

The Ramesside temple and the site survey (pdf 1.53mb)

Figures

Figures 12 (pdf 788kb)

Figures 351 (pdf 4.16mb)

Colour plates

Plates 125 (pdf 4.25mb)

Plates 2673 (pdf 4.15mb)

Plates 7495 (pdf 2.97mb)

Plates 96133 (pdf 5.56mb)

Plates 134167 (pdf 4.54mb)

Plates 168252 (pdf 5.87mb)

Plates 253265 (pdf 1.77mb)


For more Ancient World open access publications of the British Museum, see here.

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Braidwood's Amuq Survey Volume Online at the OI

Oriental Institute Publications (OIP)

book cover

OIP 48.

Mounds in the Plain of Antioch: An Archeological Survey

By Robert J. Braidwood

Download PDF Terms of Use

The Plain of Antioch in North Syria, called by the natives the Amuq, was once the site of the "Syro-Hittite" kingdom of Hattina, and there is evidence that its occupation goes back certainly to Chalcolithic times if not before. The floor of the plain is covered with mounds, most of which are now known to have preclassical remains. Early in the fall of 1933 the Expedition staff realized the value of an archeological survey which would take the form of an inventory of all the mounds in the Plain of Antioch and its tributary river valleys. The purpose of an archeological survey of this type is the complete reconnaissance of a certain area to discover what, if anything, within that area is of archeological interest.

It was not until the spring of 1936 that such a survey was carried out. The emphasis of this survey is admittedly preclassical; no attempt was made to investigate sites which were not in the form of the characteristic mound. The survey was accomplished in three weeks, but in the case of several mounds the material collected at that time was amplified by sherds picked up in previous years by the various members of the Expedition.

In this volume are presented the names of all the mounds in the Plain of Antioch, with their positions fixed on maps, as well as indications of the various cultural periods during which they were occupied and of the distribution of remains of each period.

  • Oriental Institute Publications 48
  • Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1937
  • Pp. xi + 67; 9 figures, 27 maps



For a complete and up to date list of all of the ca. two hundred and seventy volumes of Oriental Institute publications available online see AWOL - The Ancient World Online - 2: The Oriental Institute Electronic Publications Initiative.

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Friday, May 28, 2010

LCTL database of Less Commonly Taught Languages course offerings in North America

LCTL Database of Less Commonly Taught Languages Course Offerings Upgrade

The LCTL project is happy to announce that the LCTL database of Less Commonly Taught Languages course offerings in North America has been upgraded to a new more reliable server and a new platform.

————————————————————————————————————————-

Have a look: http://www.carla.umn.edu/lctl/db/index.php

We are happy to continue maintaining the database, which has been a part of CARLA since 1993 (remember Gopher?).

Not only have we made technical upgrades, we now have more fields that people can search on when they want to locate courses. In addition to the standard searchable items (language, state, institution, k-12, summer, post-secondary), we have added more search options: click on ‘advanced options’ and a larger page opens, From here, you can search for levels offered, availability, emphasis or focus of the course, degrees offered by the relevant department, whether there is a tightly integrated study abroad component, if the institution is part of a consortium like CIC, The U of California consortium, the Five Colleges in Massachusetts. Fields now have expanded ‘help’ explanations.

The value of this database certainly depends on its completeness and accuracy. You are urged to look at the courses you know about or are involved in, and submit updates, corrections or deletions. The top of every page which gives details about a course, offers a link to the correction page and an option to check if the course no longer is being offered. After you submit new details, you will receive an email confirmation. As soon as the project verifies the submission, we will add it to the available records.

For those interested in statistics, we currently have

9,287 college/university listings (from Acholi to Zulu)

2,853 listings k-12 for LCTLs

254 distance ed offerings

237 summer 2010 courses

I hope you contact me with comments, questions or suggestions.

Louis Janus

Have a look: http://www.carla.umn.edu/lctl/db/index.php


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Your views on open access publishing are needed!

The SOAP Project (*), funded by the European Commission, would like to announce the release of an online survey to assess researchers' experiences with open access publishing. This survey aims to inform the most comprehensive analysis of attitudes to open access publishing to date and is seeking views from a wide a range of interested parties. It is primarily aimed at active researchers in public and private organizations, from all research fields in science and the humanities and focuses on publication of research articles in (open access) peer-reviewed journals.

If you would like to contribute to shaping the public discourse on open access, please visit http://surveymonkey.com/soap_survey_d. It should take 10-15 minutes to complete. We would appreciate if you would share this link with your colleagues and collaborators so that the views of your discipline are properly represented.

The survey outcome will be made public and the resulting insights as well as recommendations will be openly shared with the European Commission, publishers, research funding agencies, libraries and researchers.

Thanks in advance, the SOAP Project Team info@project-soapSPAMNOT.eu


(*) Note: The SOAP consortium is coordinated by CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. It represents key stakeholders in open access, such as publishers BioMedCentral, SAGE and Springer; funding agencies (the UK Science and Technology Facilities Council) and
libraries (the Max Planck Digital Library of the Max Planck Society). The project runs for two years, from March 2009 to February 2011.


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Projects from the UCLA Cultural Virtual Reality Laboratory

Two interesting projects from the UCLA Cultural Virtual Reality Laboratory :

Digital Karnak

Through at least three thousand years of development, from local shrine in a regional town to national center of power, the temple of Amun-Ra at Karnak has known dramatic modifications tied in with political shifts, religious reform and ritual changes. As a legacy of a culture where every aspect of life was permeated with religion, the study of this temple complex touches upon every factor of human existence in ancient Egypt. Karnak therefore presents an excellent entry for understanding more about all aspects of ancient Egyptian culture and the study of its legacy.

The Digital Karnak Project aims to make the site of Karnak more accessible to students and instructors in the English-speaking world. The features of this website have been designed to provide college classrooms (and the interested public) with easily accessible, up-to-date, expert material relating to the temple precinct. As part of this goal, a 3-D Virtual Reality model of the temple was constructed, offering students a completely new way to view the temple: reign-by-reign, following the complex patterns of royal construction, modification and destruction that are now obscured by the latest building phases at the site. Footage of this model, as well as original videos and maps, are accompanied by thematic essays written and reviewed by Egyptologists to supply students and instructors with reliable information in a digital and visually dynamic platform. A simplified version of the Virtual Reality model of the temple is also made available in Google Earth, for a completely interactive experience.

A team of noted Egyptologists, educators, architects, and technologists were brought together to develop learning resources related to the Temple at Karnak in Egypt. The project had three primary goals: (1) to assemble databases of information related to Karnak, (2) build an interactive computer model of the site, and (3) create a series of resources using the model and databases that are available online free-of-charge through this website and can be easily used for undergraduate education.

The Digital Karnak Project combines the experience and talent of two sections of the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA): the Experiential Technologies Center (ETC) and the UCLA Encyclopedia of Egyptology (UEE). Directed by Dr. Diane Favro through the School of the Arts and Architecture with support from UCLA’s Academic Technology Services, the ETC uses powerful information technology tools to support creative and cross-disciplinary research in archaeology, architecture, humanities, social sciences, and the performing arts. Dr. Willeke Wendrich of the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures is director of the UCLA Digital Humanities Incubator Group (UDHIG) and the editor-in-chief of the online UCLA Encyclopedia of Egyptology (UEE), a repository for scholarly content related to Egypt.

The Digital Karnak Project was funded in part with a grant from the National Endowment of the Humanities (NEH). Financial assistance was also provided by the Steinmetz Family Trust. Staff assistance and computing infrastructure was provided by UCLA's Institute for Digital Research and Education (IDRE) and UCLA's Academic Technology Services (ATS).



Digital Roman Forum

From 1997 to 2003 the Cultural Virtual Reality Laboratory (CVRLab) created a digital model of the Roman Forum as it appeared in late antiquity. The notional date of the model is June 21, 400 A.D.

The purpose of the modeling project was to spatialize information and theories about how the Forum looked at this moment in time, which was more or less the height of its development as Rome's civic and cultural center. The digital model includes over twenty features (buildings and major monuments) filling up the western zone of the Roman Forum from the Temple of Vesta and Temple of Antoninus and Faustina on the east to the Tabularium facing the western slope of the Capitoline Hill.

Thanks to archaeological campaigns that started in the early nineteenth century and which continue to the present day, these features can be seen in Rome today and constitute one of the city's most important archaeological sites. Their state of preservation varies from fair to poor; and the ruins seen today represent a mixture of different phases in the life of the Forum. As a result, understanding the Forum is a challenging task not only for tourists but also for scholars. Almost as soon as the new excavations started bringing the ancient remains to light, archaeologists such as Canina, Huelsen, Gatteschi, and Gismondi started to create graphic and physical reconstructions of how the Forum might have looked at specific moments in time. The CVRLab digital model, created with the help of an international Scientific Advisory Committee, is the latest example of this perennial project.

From the time the modeling project was conceived, the investigators intended to present their results to students, scholars and the general public. The digital model of the Forum can be viewed on various hardware and software platforms. These range from simple static views that can be displayed on a computer monitor to dedicated visualization theaters costs hundreds of thousands of dollars or more.

With generous support from the National Science Foundation, the CVRLab was able to create this Web site about the digital Forum model from 2002 to 2005. The purposes of this site are: (1) to use the Internet to permit free use and easy viewing of the digital model by people all over the world; (2) to provide documentation for the archaeological evidence and theories utilized to create the model; and (3) to offer basic information about the individual features comprising the digital model so that their history and cultural context can be readily understood.


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Thursday, May 27, 2010

New Portable Antiquities Scheme Website

The Portable Antiquities Scheme
The Portable Antiquities Scheme is a voluntary scheme to record archaeological objects found by members of the public in England and Wales. Every year many thousands of objects are discovered, many of these by metal-detector users, but also by people whilst out walking, gardening or going about their daily work. Such discoveries offer an important source for understanding our past.

This website provides background information on the Portable Antiquities Scheme, news articles, events listings and access to our database of objects and images.
The Treasure Act

All finders of gold and silver objects, and groups of coins from the same findspot, which are over 300 years old, have a legal obligation to report such items under the Treasure Act 1996. Now prehistoric base-metal assemblages found after 1st January 2003 also qualify as Treasure. This website provides further information for finders of potential Treasure.

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Tuesday, May 25, 2010

New Heidelberg Papyri Catalogue Online

Posted yesterday on PAPY - the list for papyrologists:
Liebe Papyrologen,

Seit Freitag letzter Woche hat das Institut für Papyrologie Heidelberg
eine neue Version der arabischen, demotischen, griechischen und
koptischen Kataloge seiner Papyrussammlung online gestellt. Die
Kataloge sind am leichtesten über das Homepage des Instituts zu
erreichen:

http://www.uni-heidelberg.de/fakultaeten/philosophie/zaw/papy/index.html

wo auf der rechten Seite die Projekte des Instituts anklickbar sind.


Dear papyrologists,

As of Friday last week the Institute of Papyrology, Heidelberg has put
a new version of its Arabic, Demotic, Greek and Coptic catalogues
online. The easiest way of locating them is by using the homepage of
the institute:

http://www.uni-heidelberg.de/fakultaeten/philosophie/zaw/papy/index.html

where the Institutes projects are listed on the right of the screen
and now clickable.

with best wishes in the name of the Institute

James M.S. Cowey

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Eastern Mediterranean Landscapes

Unlocking historic landscapes in the eastern Mediterranean
Jim Crow (University of Edinburgh) and Sam Turner (Newcastle University), 2010
In many areas of the Eastern Mediterranean there are landscapes exhibiting exceptional time-depth, where the historic landscape is made up of visible features from many different periods. Our research adapted and used a new technique developed in Britain (Historic Landscape Characterisation - HLC) for the first time in the eastern Mediterranean to study these landscapes. HLC is a method for mapping the landscape that can be used to interpret how and when different elements were created. Using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) we integrated data from historical, archaeological and other sources to create detailed, long-term landscape histories of two case-studies areas.

Introduction | Overview | Downloads | Download Support | Viewers | Help


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Monday, May 24, 2010

Recent offerings from the Griffifth Institute

Since the beginning of 2010, the Griffith Institute has published and updated the following files:
And see Open Access Archives: Griffith Institute.

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Thursday, May 20, 2010

Open Access Euripides Scholia

Euripides Scholia
This site is the home of a new open-access digital edition of the scholia on the plays of the ancient Athenian tragedian Euripides (born ca. 485-480, died winter 407/406 BCE). It presents the ongoing results of a project of Donald Mastronarde, Professor of Classics at the University of California, Berkeley. This first version of the site, released in April 2010, should be considered a ‘beta version’. It is dedicated to the memory of Kjeld Matthiessen, a great scholar of the medieval manuscripts and transmission of Euripides who had himself hoped one day to work on editing the scholia.
Creative Commons License
Euripides Scholia, together with the related source files, by Donald J. Mastronarde is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License & Source Files
.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available by contacting the author through the link on his name.

Home | Project Description | The Manuscripts | The XML Structure | Conventions & Abbreviations | Bibliography | Greek Font | License & Source Files


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Digital islam: 971 Islamic Studies Ph.D. theses

Digital islam: Theses on EThOS
This project aims to digitise the 860 doctoral theses sourced from UK HEIs identified by the JISC funded ‘Review of User Requirements for Digitised Resources in Islamic Studies’.

The project will also run an initial feasibility study to test whether the 860 identified thesis are available for digitisation, and if not, how the allocation may be delivered from other related theses.

The project will use The British Library digitisation suite and experience to digitise the identified PhD theses on a cost recovery basis and to make them available via EThOS and the proposed National Gateway to islamic Resources.

This project is now complete and 971 Ph.D. Islamic Studies theses are now available.
A full list can be obtained by using the search phrase 'JISC Digital Islam' on the Ethos service

See also the AWOL Monday, April 5, 2010 posting ETHoS: Electronic Thesis Online Service

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Wednesday, May 19, 2010

Ancient Music

NEAR AND MIDDLE EASTERN ARCHAEOMUSICOLOGY

The website of ICONEA (International Conference of Near Easten Archaeomusicology) includes information on conferences as well as the following two open access publications:

ICONEA 2008: Proceedings of the International Conference of Near Eastern Archaeomusicology Held at the British Museum December 4, 5 and 6, 2008
Edited by RICHARD DUMBRILL & IRVING FINKEL
© Copyright 2010 Richard Dumbrill and Irving Finkel

Table of Contents

  • POSSESSED BY THE GREAT MOTHER: MUSIC AND TRANCE IN ANCIENT POMPEII AND IN THE POPULAR TRADITION OF SOUTHERN ITALY, Roberto Melini page 1
  • NEW LIGHT ON THE BABYLONIAN TONAL SYSTEM, Leon Crickmore page 11
  • THE ANCIENT MESOPOTAMIAN SISTRUM AND ITS REFERENCES IN CUNEIFORM
  • LITERATURE: THE IDENTIFICATION OF THE ŠEM AND MEZE, Uri Gabbay page 23
  • MUSICAL RECONSTRUCTION OF THE HURRIAN MATERIAL BY STATISTICAL
  • ANALYSIS, David Halperin page 29
  • ANOTHER LOOK AT ALLEGED ANCIENT BAGPIPES, Terence Mitchell page 33
  • PLAYING IN CONCERT IN THE ANCIENT NEAR EAST, Dominique Collon page 47
  • A QUEENS’S ORCHESTRA AT THE COURT OF MARI: A NEW PERSPECTIVE ON THE ARCHAIC INSTRUMENTARIUM IN THE THIRD MILLENNIUM BC, Myriam Marcetteau page 67
  • ANCIENT NEAR EASTERN AND EARLY JEWISH LYRE TRADITIONS, Siam Bhayro page 77
  • BULL LYRES, SILVER LYRES, SILVER PIPES AND ANIMALS IN SUMER, Bo Lawergren page 83
  • A SUMERIAN TEXT IN QUANTIFIED ARCHAEOMUSICOLOGY, Ernest McClain page 89
  • EVIDENCE AND INFERENCE IN TEXTS OF THEORY IN THE ANCIENT NEAR EAST, Richard Dumbrill page105
  • A TRAVELER’S TALES: OBSERVATIONS ON MUSICAL MOBILITY IN MESOPOTAMIA
  • AND BEYOND, Piotr Michalowski page 117
  • MUSICAL ENSEMBLES IN ANCIENT MESOPOTAMIA, Theo Krispijn page 125
  • A NEW HYPOTHESIS FOR THE ELABORATION OF HEPTATONIC
  • SCALES AND CONSEQUENCES IN UNDERSTANDING THEIR ORIGINS, Amine Beyhom page 151

ARANE: Archaeomusicological Review of the Ancient Near East
A publication of ICONEA, The International conference
of Near Eastern Archaeomusicology
Volume I - 2009


Table of Contents
  • THE TONAL SYSTEMS OF MESOPOTAMIA AND ANCIENT GREECE : SOME SIMILARITIES
  • AND DIFFERENCES, Leon Crickmore page 1
  • ANCIENT ISRAEL/PALESTINE AND THE NEW HISTORIOGRAPHY OF MUSIC: SOME UNANSWERED QUESTIONS, Joachim Braun page 17
  • FOUR TABLES FROM THE TEMPLE LIBRARY OF NIPPUR: A SOURCE FOR PLATO’S
  • NUMBER IN RELATION TO THE QUANTIFICATION OF BABYLONIAN TONE NUMBERS, Richard J Dumbrill, page 27
  • EMBODYING MUSICAL PERFORMANCES IN THE ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN, Agnès Garcia-Ventura and Mireia López-Bertran page 39
  • IS THE HEPTAGRAM IN CBS1766 A DIAL?, Richard J Dumbrill page 47
  • HARMONIC MYTHOLOGY Nine interdisciplinary research notes Leon Crickmore page 51
  • THE HORN QUARTET: A STUDY OF BULL, COW, CALF AND STAG FIGURES ON SUMERIAN LYRES, Myriam Marcetteau page 67

More Göttinger Miszellen online

In the past couple of days, additional volumes of Göttinger Miszellen have come on line.
Volumes (1972) - 219 (2008) are currently accessible to subscribers to Digizeitschften.

Other ancient content in this aggregation is here.

If you'd like to have access to these and the rest of the Digizeitschriften collection, bring it to the attention of your librarians.

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

Archaeological Sites in Israel

Archaeological Sites in Israel
Cumulative Table of Contents

Akko - The Maritime Capital of the Crusader Kingdom
Apollonia-Arsuf - A Crusader City and Fortress on the Mediterreanean Coast
Arad - Canaanite city and Israelite citadel in the Negev
Avdat - A Nabatean City in the Negev
Banyas - Cult Center of the God Pan
Beer Shema - The Church of St. Stephen
Be'er Sheva - Prehistoric Dwelling Sites
Be'er Sheva - Border of the Kingdom of Judah
Beit Alpha - An Ancient Synagogue with a splendid Mosaic Floor
Beit She'an - A Biblical City and Scythopolis- A Roman-Byzantine City
Beit She'arim - The Jewish necropolis of the Roman Period
Beit Shemesh - Biblical city on the border between Judah and Philistia
Belvoir - A Crusader Fortress Overlooking the Jordan Valley
Bethsaida - Ancient Fishing Village on shore of the Sea of Galilee
Byzantine Churches in the Negev
Caesarea - from Roman City to Crusader Fortress
Capernaum - City of Jesus and its Jewish Synagogue
The Carmel Caves - Dwellings of Prehistoric Man
Cave of the Ereasure - A Hoard of Metal Objects from the Chalcolithic Period
The Church of the Seat of Mary (Kathisma)
Dan - Biblical City
The Eilat Region - Southern Gateway
Ein Gedi - An Ancient Oasis Settlement
Ein Hatzeva - Fortress on the Border with Edom
Ekron - a Philistine City
Gamala - Jewish City on the Golan
Gezer - A Canaanite City and Royal Solomonic City
Golan - A Unique Chalcolithic culture
Hamat Gader - Baths of Medicinal Hot Springs
Hatzor - "The Head of all those Kingdoms"
Herodium - King Herod's Palace-Fortress
Interesting Archeological Finds (1998)
Jericho - The Winter Palace of King Herod
Jerusalem - Binyane Ha'uma: A Ceramics Workshop of the Tenth Roman Legion
Jerusalem - Burial Sites
Jerusalem - The Citadel
Jerusalem - City of David
Jerusalem - Church of the Holy Sepulcher
Jerusalem - Herodian Street
Jerusalem - Elaborate buildings of the Mamluk Period
Jerusalem - Nea Church and Cardo
Jerusalem - Northern Gate of Aelia Capitolina
Jerusalem - Silver Plaques
Jerusalem - Pomegranate from Solomonic Temple
Jerusalem - Umayyad Center and Palaces
Jerusalem - The Upper City during the Second Temple Period
Jerusalem - Water Systems of Biblical Times
Jerusalem - Western Wall and its Tunnels
Katzrin - A Village in the Golan
Kiryat Sefer - A Synagogue in a Jewish Village of the Second Temple Period
Kursi - Christian Monastery
Lachish - Royal City of the Kingdom of Judah
Masada - Desert Fortress Overlooking the Dead Sea
Megiddo - The Solomonic "Chariot City"
The Monastery of Martyrius
Nahal Refa'im - Canaanite Bronze Age villages near Jerusalem
Nebi Samwil - Site of a Biblical Town and a Crusader Fortress
The Nimrod Fortress - Muslim Stronghold on Golan
Qumran - Center of a Jewish Sect of the Second Temple period and the Dead Sea Scrolls found in Caves nearby
Ramat Rahel - A Royal Citadel and a Palace of the Last Kings of Judah
Ramla - Arab Capital of the Province of Palestine
Recent archeological discoveries
- Archeological Sites in Israel - No. 2 (1998)
Recent archeological discoveries
- Archeological Sites in Israel - No. 3 (1998)
Recent archeological discoveries
- Archeological Sites in Israel - No. 4 (1999)
Recent archeological discoveries
- Archeological Sites in Israel - No. 5 (1999)
Recent archeological discoveries
- Archeological Sites in Israel - No. 6 (2000)
Recent archeological discoveries
- Archeological Sites in Israel - No. 7 (2001)
Recent archeological discoveries
- Archeological Sites in Israel - No. 8 (2003)
Rogem Hiri
The Roman Boat from the Sea of Galilee
Sha'ar Hagolan - Neolithic Village
Tabgha - Church of the Multiplication of the Loaves and the Fishes
Tel Qasile - A Philistine Settlement with a Temple
Tiberias - Anchor Church
Timna - Valley of the Ancient Copper Mines
Underwater exploration
Yodefat - A Town in Galilee
Zippori - Galilee

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