Thursday, May 12, 2016

Gorgias Open: Free for the Sake of Knowledge

Gorgias Open: Free for the Sake of Knowledge
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Gorgias Open Access makes top-quality research available at no cost to anyone with an internet connection. Once a publication has passed its peer-review process and has been approved for publication, the author has the option to make it available through our Gorgias Open repository as well as in a traditional print format. 

Open access publishing is good news for everyone. It combines our scholars’ careful research with our capabilities to polish and independently review academic work. Best of all, it means that no one is prevented from accessing the latest information because of lack of funds. For more information on the logic behind open access, including links to studies on its effectiveness, please see the section called, "Why Open Access?"
 
Otherwise, the results speak for themselves: more readers and greater impact.
Our Open Access Program website is divided into several parts, which you can navigate using the blue bar above.
  • In "Why Open Access?" you can find out more about how the open access program works and which books we can make available at no cost to the reader.
  • Last but not least, in "Repository," you'll be able to read and download free content from Gorgias' academic specialties.
John Wansbrough is famous for his pioneering studies on the “sectarian milieu” out of which Islam emerged. In his view, Islam grew out of different - albeit rather marginal - Jewish and Christian traditions. In the present volume, which is dedicated to Wansbrough’s memory, specialists in Islamic studies and students of the Jewish and early Christian traditions summarise Wansbrough’s achievements in the past thirty years and chart the future of the tradition study of the “sectarian milieu.”
This collection of original research papers examines early commentaries on the New Testament and the transmission of the biblical text. Focussing principally on Greek and Latin tradition, it provides new insights into the sources and manuscripts of commentators and catenae.
This ground-breaking study offers a reassessment of Moses' book of the law from a narrative theory perspective. Concerned for the long-term viability of his people, Moses legislates a public reading of his document which is deposited next to the ark of the covenant as a national testament. Through the mechanics of narrative mediation, the narrator reveals to the reader of Deuteronomy the contents of Moses' enshrined publication. Deuteronomy's simulcast of Moses' book invites external readers to compare and evaluate their readings with story-world readers who access the same text within the Bible's Primary Narrative.
A collection of ten original papers on the New Testament text, first presented in 2013, which reflect the diversity of current research. Examples of ancient engagement with the Bible include Origen, Eusebius of Caesarea and Augustine along with early translations.

This volume examines the perception of music’s past, in all its historical, geographical and cultural breadth. The wide-ranging collection of papers address the interpretation of past music cultures from the earliest records of antiquity until the present.
This work consists of a selection of papers from sessions during the first two years of SBL Consultation on Midrash. It demonstrates innovative approaches to midrashic texts and hermeneutic reflections on similarities and differences between interpretations of the Bible.
Jacob of Serugh’s vision of ‘Salvation in Christ’, in its exegetical, theological, catechetical, liturgical and pastoral aspects, is reviewed in this monograph. Jacob’s mode of symbolic-mystical-silence approach to the mystery of Christ is explained. This treatise gathers up Jacob’s typological and symbolic thought-patterns, in his own language, categories, terminologies, and imageries.
This article, drawn from Malphono w-Rabo d-Malphone, analyzes a Syriac legal document from the Upper Euphrates. Along with his analysis, Healey provides a translation and transliteration of the document.

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