Friday, July 31, 2009

Open Access Publication: The Demotic Dictionary of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago, Letter H2

The Demotic Dictionary of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago, Letter H2
The Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago announces the publication of a new title, available exclusively online.

The Demotic Dictionary of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago, Letter H2.

Kindly note that CDD H2 (h with under dot) is the first of five letters to be released this summer. Soon to follow are CDD W, P, M, and Sh. The final three letters, CDD 'I, S, and T, will be released at the conclusion of the project. Thereafter, a printed copy of the CDD is scheduled to be published, which will include the twenty-four letters and all the supporting documentation.
Letters completed to date include:


Completed LettersDownload
PrologueDownload PDFTerms of Use
3Download PDFTerms of Use
cDownload PDFTerms of Use
YDownload PDFTerms of Use
BDownload PDFTerms of Use
FDownload PDFTerms of Use
NDownload PDFTerms of Use
RDownload PDFTerms of Use
LDownload PDFTerms of Use
HDownload PDFTerms of Use
H2Download PDFTerms of Use
H3Download PDFTerms of Use
H4Download PDFTerms of Use
QDownload PDFTerms of Use
KDownload PDFTerms of Use
GDownload PDFTerms of Use
TJDownload PDFTerms of Use
DJDownload PDFTerms of Use
Problematic EntriesDownload PDFTerms of Use
Problematic Entries 2Download PDFTerms of Use

Atlas database of exhibits

LOUVRE Atlas database of exhibits

Simple search | Advanced search | By room | By department | Recent acquisitions
The Atlas database covers all the works exhibited in the museum - some 30,000 items.

Internet users, like museum visitors, will find the usual explanatory texts that accompany museum exhibits, compiled under the authority of the museum curators.
New images are currently being added to the database, which is constantly updated.

The Atlas database currently contains some 30,000 works - 98 % of the museum's exhibits, distributed throughout the museum's departments as follows:

Near Eastern Antiquities: some 5777 works
Islamic Art: some 1283 works
Egyptian Antiquities: some 4851 works
Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Antiquities: some 6099 works

Decorative Arts: some 6613 works
Sculptures: some 1764 works
Paintings: some 3507 works
Prints and Drawings: some 113 works
Medieval Louvre and History of the Louvre: some 136 works


Thursday, July 30, 2009

Tracings made in various Theban tombs by Norman and Nina de Garis Davies

Tracings made in various Theban tombs by Norman and Nina de Garis Davies, and others

Some 1,000 sheets of tracings made in various Theban tombs by
Norman and Nina de Garis Davies sometime between 1920 and
1940, now in the Archive of the Griffith Institute, will be made
available on the Institute's website.



Friday, July 24, 2009

Open Access Digital Library: ArchNet

ArchNet
ArchNet is an exciting project being developed at the MIT School of Architecture and Planning in close cooperation with, and with the full support of The Aga Khan Trust for Culture, an agency of the Aga Khan Development Network. The Aga Khan Trust for Culture is a private, non-denominational, international development agency with programmes dedicated to the improvement of built environments in societies where Muslims have a significant presence.

The goal of ArchNet is to create a community of architects, planners, educators, and students. The community can help each other by sharing expertise, local experience, resources, and dialogue. Members are urged to take on a pro-active role in the community. Imagine the wealth of knowledge and history created in the various schools of architecture around the world. ArchNet hopes to tap that knowledge and provide a mechanism by which these valuable tools can be disseminated.

ArchNet will provide an extensive, high-quality, globally accessible, intellectual resource focused on architecture and planning issues and includes restoration, conservation, housing, landscape, and related concerns. It is to be achieved by providing on an accessible server, images, Geographic Information System and Computer-Aided Design databases, a searchable text library, bibliographical reference databases, online lectures, curricular materials, papers, essays, and reviews, discussion forums and statistical information. The structure will be designed to offer each user a personal workspace tailored to his or her individual needs. From this space, they will be able to contribute their own findings and research to the larger site. The website will aim to foster close ties between institutions and between users. Through the use of online forums, chat rooms, and debates, it is hoped that the site can encourage and promote discussions amongst participants. ArchNet will be accessible to anyone with an Internet connection. It will be a bottom-up system, in which information will eventually flow directly from the user to a continually expanding database which can be shared by all. The system will be designed to promote ready intercommunication and maintenance of an international scholarly community of ArchNet members.

ArchNet is envisaged as a borderless network of institutions contributing to, and learning from each other, which would have considerable influence in the way that architects and planners are educated and practice. New computer and telecommunication technologies have great potential for supporting communication and collaboration among architectural and planning students, faculty, scholars, and practitioners throughout the world. ArchNet will provide opportunities for realising that potential. Membership is free and your personal information will be kept confidential. Registration only takes a few moments and is necessary for those who would like the ability to be able to contribute to ArchNet.

Members can contribute by adding their individual image collections and files in their personal workspace; they can add events to the Digital Calander; post a topic or a response in the Discussion Forum; create a Group Workspace with other members from around the globe; work with their institution to create an Institution Workspace to make student work and faculty research available to the larger community; and, add to the academic directory or link to web resources in the Reference Section of the Digital Library. To find out more how you can contribute please go to the Help Module.

All of ArchNet's resources are worthy of serious exploration, but note in particular the following digital publications

Alam al-Bina
The Center of Planning and Architectural Studies [CPAS] established in Cairo in 1980 is considered to be the first integrated center of its kind in the Arab world. The CPAS works along two parallel lines: the first is in the field of architecture and planning, with consultation services in Egypt and other Arab countries. The second is in the field of training, research and publication, as exemplified by Alam al-Bina (or Alam al-Bena'a), a monthly architectural magazine.

Alam al-Bina is accessible online for the first time on ArchNet, through the generous contribution of CPAS. The ArchNet Digital Library offers selected articles in .pdf format from volumes 198 through 216, published in 1998 and 1999.

ArchNet-IJAR

Archnet-IJAR International Journal of Architectural Research is an interdisciplinary, fully-refereed scholarly online journal of architecture, planning, and built environment studies. ArchNet-IJAR is edited by Ashraf Salama.

Two international boards (advisory and editorial) ensure the quality of scholarly papers and allow for a comprehensive academic review of contributions spanning a wide spectrum of issues, methods, theoretical approaches and architectural and development practices.

ArchNet-IJAR provides a comprehensive academic review of a wide spectrum of issues, methods, and theoretical approaches. It aims to bridge theory and practice in the fields of architectural/design research and urban planning/built environment studies, reporting on the latest research findings and innovative approaches for creating responsive environments. Articles are listed individually and can be sorted by author, title or year.

Ars Orientalis

Ars Orientalis is sponsored by the University of Michigan Department of the History of Art and the Freer Gallery of Art of the Smithsonian Institution. This journal is an annual volume of scholarly articles and book reviews on the art and archaeology of Asia, including the ancient Near East and the Islamic world. It fosters a broad range of themes and approaches, targeting scholars in diverse fields. Occasional thematic volumes are published.

Oleg Grabar, Constructing the Study of Islamic Art

"Constructing the Study of Islamic Art is a set of four volumes of studies by Oleg Grabar. Between them they bring together more than eighty articles, studies and essays, work spanning half a century. Each volume takes a particular section of the topic, the four volumes being entitled: Early Islamic Art, 650-1100; Islamic Visual Culture, 1100-1800; Islamic Art and Beyond; and Jerusalem. Reflecting the many incidents of a long academic life, they illustrate one scholar's attempt at making order and sense of 1400 years of artistic growth. They deal with architecture, painting, objects, iconography, theories of art, aesthetics and ornament, and they seek to integrate our knowledge of Islamic art with Islamic culture and history as well as with the global concerns of the History of Art. In addition to the articles selected, each volume contains an introduction which describes, often in highly personal ways, the context in which Grabar's scholarship developed and the people who directed and mentored his efforts." (Ashgate)

Mimar: Architecture in Development
Mimar: Architecture in Development was first published in 1981 and had a print run of 43 issues. At the time of Mimar's inception, it was the only international architecture magazine focusing on architecture in the developing world and related issues of concern. It aimed at exchanging ideas and images between countries which are developing new directions for their built environment. ArchNet is pleased to offer the complete set of Mimar: Architecture in Development, in the ArchNet Digital Library.
Muqarnas: An Annual on the Visual Culture of the Islamic World
The Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture at Harvard University and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology sponsors scholarly works on the history of Islamic art and architecture. Its major publication is Muqarnas: An Annual on the Visual Culture of the Islamic World.

Muqarnas is a lively forum of discussion among scholars and students in the West and in the Islamic world. Subjects covered in its pages include the history of Islamic art and architecture up to the present, with attention devoted as well to aspects of Islamic culture, history, and learning. It is widely regarded as the foremost scholarly journal for historians of art and architecture who focus on the Islamic world. Annual volumes of Muqarnas are periodically accompanied by special research supplements. To date, twenty volumes of have been published.

ArchNet is pleased to offer Muqarnas volumes one through sixteen in the ArchNet Digital Library, with special permission from E.J. Brill and Yale University Publications (volumes one and two). Clicking on the 'year' column heading below will sort articles by volume. Volumes one through twelve are entitled Muqarnas: An Annual on Islamic Art and Architecture.

Wednesday, July 22, 2009

Open Access Book: From Babylon to Baghdad: Ancient Iraq and the Modern West

From Babylon to Baghdad: Ancient Iraq and the Modern West
(Press Release) July 22, 2009 - WASHINGTON, D.C. – Announcing the release of From Babylon to Baghdad: Ancient Iraq and the Modern West, a free e-book published by the Biblical Archaeology Society (BAS). This latest publication from BAS comes at a time of great concern for Iraq’s cultural heritage on the part of the archaeological community, which is outlined in a recent UNESCO report assessing the damage incurred to ancient sites and museums during the course of the Iraq war.

From Babylon to Baghdad: Ancient Iraq and the Modern West examines the relationship between ancient Iraq and the cultures of modern Western societies. This collection of articles, written by scholars who are the authorities on their subjects, details some of the ways in which ancient Near Eastern civilizations have impressed themselves on our Western culture. It examines the evolving relationship that modern scholarship has with this part of the world, and chronicles the present-day fight to preserve Iraq’s cultural heritage.

The four-article collection is comprised of the following:

“The Genesis of Genesis: Is the Creation Story Babylonian?” by Victor Hurowitz of Ben Gurion
University, examines the relationship between Mesopotamian mythology and the Judeo-Christian creation story.

“Backwards Glance: Americans at Nippur,” by Katharine Eugenia Jones, recounts the adventures—and misadventures—of the first American archaeological expedition to the region.

“Europe Confronts Assyrian Art,” by Mogens Trolle Larsen of the University of Copenhagen, explains what Europeans first thought of the art and artifacts that began to arrive in the West from the excavations of ancient Mesopotamian sites.

“Firsthand Report: Tracking Down the Looted Treasures of Iraq,” by reservist Colonel Matthew
Bogdanos, head of the military-led coalition of law enforcement agencies called the Joint Inter-Agency Coordination Group, chronicles the efforts to retrieve the priceless artifacts looted from the Baghdad Museum in April 2003, following the fall of Baghdad to U.S. forces.

This free e-book is available for download at www.biblicalarchaeology.org/iraq. For more information, please visit the Biblical Archaeology Society’s Web site or contact Sarah Yeomans at
1.202.364.3300 ext. 221.

Open Access Journal: Numismatic Literature

Numismatic Literature
ISSN: 0029-6031
Numismatic Literature is the Society's annotated bibliography of published work in all fields of numismatics. At its core NumLit is a text archive that supports multiple delivery formats, one that is designed for longevity in the face of rapid technological innovation. For users, NumLitNumLit is very much "under development" and comments are very welcome. currently exists as subject and author indexes that are regularly updated as new titles are entered. The titles are also listed in the reverse order of when they were added. Please note that
NumLit is a community effort so that we also wish to thank the regional editors. We will be working to establish new procedures for accepting entries, including on-line submission, and welcome preliminary indications from anyone who might be interested in participating.
NumLit 144, 145, 146, 147, 148 and 149 are currently available in the following formats, the first three of which are automatically generated from the last:

149 [2005] (In preparation)
148 [2004] (In preparation)
147 [2003] (Available from Oxbowbooks. Search for "numismatic literature".)
146 [2002] (Available from Oxbowbooks. Search for "numismatic literature".)
145 [2001] (Available from Oxbowbooks. Search for "numismatic literature".)
144 [2000] (Available from Oxbowbooks. Search for "numismatic literature".)

Thursday, July 16, 2009

Smell of Books (with apologies in advance)

Smell of Books
Does your Kindle leave you feeling like there’s something missing from your reading experience?

Have you been avoiding e-books because they just don’t smell right?

If you’ve been hesitant to jump on the e-book bandwagon, you’re not alone. Book lovers everywhere have resisted digital books because they still don’t compare to the experience of reading a good old fashioned paper book.

But all of that is changing thanks to Smell of Books™, a revolutionary new aerosol e-book enhancer.

Now you can finally enjoy reading e-books without giving up the smell you love so much. With Smell of Books™ you can have the best of both worlds, the convenience of an e-book and the smell of your favorite paper book.

Smell of Books™ is compatible with a wide range of e-reading devices and e-book formats and is 100% DRM-compatible. Whether you read your e-books on a Kindle or an iPhone using Stanza, Smell of Books™ will bring back that real book smell you miss so much.

Wednesday, July 8, 2009

Virtual Manuscript Room (VMR)

Launched today, 8 July 2009:

Virtual Manuscript Room (VMR)
This site is the first phase of The Virtual Manuscript Room (VMR) project. In this phase, we present full digitized manuscripts from The Mingana Collection of Middle Eastern Manuscripts held at Special Collections in the University of Birmingham. This collection, previously unavailable on the web, has been designated as of national and international importance. As well as high-resolution images of each page, the VMR provides descriptions from the printed catalogue and from Special Collections' own records.

The next phase of the VMR will provide a framework to bring together digital resources related to manuscript materials (digital images, descriptions and other metadata, transcripts) in an environment which will permit libraries to add images, scholars to add and edit metadata and transcripts online, and users to access material. Two other groups of content, amounting to over 50,000 digital images of manuscripts, 500 manuscript descriptions and around 1000 pages of transcripts, will be added in the next phase of the VMR: materials relating to the New Testament and to medieval vernacular texts (Dante, Chaucer, and others)...

This site presents digital facsimiles of 71 manuscripts from the Mingana Collection, in 13209 images.

The Mingana Collection contains more than 3000 manuscripts in at least eleven languages, ranging from around the 6th to the 20th centuries. The collection is focused on manuscripts from the Middle East in Arabic, Syriac, Persian and Greek and has particular strengths in illustrated manuscripts, and early Islamic and Syraic materials (including one of the oldest Qur'ans in existence).

The core of the collection was acquired by Alphonse Mingana (1878-1937) in three trips to the Middle East between 1925 and 1929, with substantial support from Edward Cadbury. The Edward Cadbury Charitable Trust Inc. has continued to provide support for the maintenance and development of the collection, now housed in the University of Birmingham Department of Special Collections...


Image Islamic_Arabic

Islamic Arabic


Image Syriac

Syriac


Image Persian

Persian


Image Greek

Greek


Image Other
Other


Image Christian_Arabic
Christian Arabic

Tuesday, July 7, 2009

Open Access Book: A history of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, 1882-1942, an intercollegiate project

A history of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, 1882-1942; an intercollegiate project.
Author:Louis E Lord
Publisher: Cambridge, Pub. for the American School of Classical Studies at Athens [by] Harvard Univ. Press, 1947.
Description: xiv, 417 p. illus. 23 cm
ISBN: 9780876619032

The following is the text of the history of the ASCSA between its foundation and 1942, written by Louis E. Lord. It was first published on behalf of the School in 1947 by Harvard University Press. A scanned PDF (43.2 MB) of the whole volume, complete with page numbers and images, is available for free download. The book (ISBN 9780876619032) is out of print. Because the text below was rekeyed from a printed copy, please be alert for errors. If you spot errors, we would be grateful if you could let us know.

Preface

Chapter I: The Founding of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens and the Chairmanship of John Williams White of Harvard University, 1881–1887

Chapter II: The Chairmanship of Thomas Day Seymour of Yale University, 1887–1901

Chapter III: The Chairmanship of James Rignall Wheeler of Columbia University, 1901–1918

Chapter IV: The Chairmanship of Edward Capps of Princeton University, 1918–1939

Appendix I: The First Year of the School at Athens, by Harold N. Fowler

Appendix II: How I Became a Captain in the Greek Army, by Walter Miller

Appendix III: Excavations of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, 1882–1940

Appendix IV: Publications of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, 1882–1941

Appendix V: Special Endowment Funds of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens

Appendix VI: Directory of Trustees, Managing Committee, Faculty and Students,1882–1942



Monday, July 6, 2009

Codex Sinaiticus

Codex Sinaiticus
Codex Sinaiticus, a manuscript of the Christian Bible written in the middle of the fourth century, contains the earliest complete copy of the Christian New Testament. The hand-written text is in Greek. The New Testament appears in the original vernacular language (koine) and the Old Testament in the version, known as the Septuagint, that was adopted by early Greek-speaking Christians. In the Codex, the text of both the Septuagint and the New Testament has been heavily annotated by a series of early correctors.

The significance of Codex Sinaiticus for the reconstruction of the Christian Bible's original text, the history of the Bible and the history of Western book-making is immense...
As of 6 July 2009, the Codex Sinaiticus website features all extant pages of the Codex.

Wednesday, July 1, 2009

New Open Access Book: The Archaeology and Geography of Ancient Transcaucasian Societies

The Archaeology and Geography of Ancient Transcaucasian Societies, Volume 1.
The Foundations of Research and Regional Survey in the Tsaghkahovit Plain, Armenia


Adam T. Smith, Ruben S. Badalyan, Pavel Avetisyan
With contributions by Alan Greene and Leah Minc
Oriental Institute Publications, Volume 134
Chicago: The Oriental Institute, 2009
ISBN-13: 978-1-885923-62-2
Pp. xlvi + 410; 72 figures, 82 plates, 7 tables
$90.00
Until recently, the South Caucasus was a virtual terra incognita on
Western archaeological maps of southwest Asia. The conspicuous absence
of marked places — of site names, toponyms, and topography — gave the
impression of a region distant, unknown, and vacant. The Joint
American-Armenian Project for the Archaeology and Geography of Ancient
Transcaucasian Societies (Project ArAGATS) was founded in 1998 to
explore this terrain. Our investigations were guided by two overarching
goals: to illuminate the social and political transformations central to
the region’s unique (pre)history and to explore the broader intellectual
implications of collaboration between the rich archaeological traditions
of Armenia (former U.S.S.R.) and the United States.

This volume provides the first encompassing report on the ongoing
studies of Project ArAGATS, detailing the general context of
contemporary archaeological research in the South Caucasus as well as
the specific context of our regional investigations in the Tsaghkahovit
Plain of central Armenia. The book opens with detailed examinations of
the history of archaeology in the South Caucasus, the theoretical
problems that currently orient archaeological research, and a
comprehensive reevaluation of the material bases for regional chronology
and periodization.

The work then provides the complete results of our regional
investigations in the Tsaghkahovit Plain, including the findings of the
first systematic pedestrian survey ever conducted in the Caucasus.
Thanks to the results presented in this volume, and Project ArAGATS’s
ongoing excavations in the area, the Tsaghkahovit Plain is today the
best-known archaeological region in the South Caucasus. The present
volume thus provides archaeologists with both an orientation to the
prehistory of the South Caucasus and the complete findings of the first
phase of Project ArAGATS’s field investigations.

To order the printed book, in North America contact The David Brown Book
Company, PO Box 511, Oakville, CT 06779, Toll Free: 1-800-791-9354, Fax:
860-945-9468, e-mail: queries@dbbconline.com. In Europe and elsewhere,
contact Oxbow Books, Park End Place, Oxford, OX1 1HN, UK, Tel: (+44) (0)
1865-241-249, Fax: (+44) (0) 1865-794-449, e-mail: oxbow@oxbowbooks.com.
Website: www.oxbowbooks.com.